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Assess Sociological Explanations of Suicide

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Assess sociological explanations of the functions and forms of punishments of offenders.
Note- Make sure the points link to the question. Don’t just talk about theory. Write about what it tells you about the forms and purposes of punishment. 1- Define punishment. There are many different forms such as…. There are also many different aims such as….
Punishment is the process that enforces a sentence/ penalty for a crime committed. It is one of the main ways sociologists believe we can prevent and control crime. There are many different forms of punishment such as deterrence that sanction the offender to prevent them to commit crimes. There are also many different aims of punishment such as protecting the interests of the ruling class and preventing the working class from rebelling, as foretold by Marxists. 2- Reduction. Say what it is and what it does, including giving examples… Also, say the three types of reduction, what they are and how they help/ effect
Reduction is a sociological explanation for the punishment of offenders. They are carried out to prevent future crimes from occurring. There are three ways in which it can be carried out.
Deterrence is punishing the individual to discourage them from future offending. “Making an example” of them may also serve as a deterrent to the public at large. An example of a punishment is Anti Social Behavioural Orders (ASBOs). These help deter others from offending because…. You publicly humiliate them to deter others to avoid the same kind of shame by society. However, this is not perceived the same by labelling theorists. They believe by giving punishments such as ASBOs, you are giving them a label which can lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy as they would be mocked by society and can only turn to themselves and those in similar situations. Furthermore, Right Realists say….
Rehabilitation. This is the idea…...

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