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Beyond Tokyo: Disney’s Expansion in Asia

In: Business and Management

Submitted By tramtron
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Beyond Tokyo: Disney’s Expansion in Asia 1) The cultural challenges are posed by Disney’s expansion into Asia are limited attractions based on size and local regulations, hot weather, and high ticket prices.
Cultural barriers happened such as the decision to serve shark fin soup, a local favourite, greatly angered environmentalist.
For example, the decision to serve shark fin soup, a local favourite, greatly angered environmentalists.
It is different in Europe as they have more choices for food because there are more countries in European group.
Disney guests in Europe faced problems getting too closed or pressing around those who left too much space between themselves and the person in front. But it’s quite normal in Asian countries due to their population
Hong Kong Disneyland only has 16 attractions and one classic Disney thrill ride, Space Mountain, compared to 52 at Disneyland Resort Paris.
Weather in Europe tends to be cooler and their currency is higher than Hong Kong currency so people probably find the ticket cheaper. 2) Cultural variables influence the location choice of theme parks around the world because they are important factors to determine whether the parks will become successful or not. To locate a theme park they have to think whether people in the country will like this kind of theme park and will go for them or is it suitable for this county to locate this theme park. People who built the theme park needs to account the factor that whether it is easy for people in that country to adapt new things. 3) I would recommend nowhere in Asia because there might be a lot of theme park already in Asia, thus it will be really competitive. Furthermore, the ticket price might be expensive for Asian citizens to go and visit. Especially the weather is very hot and humid in most of Asia countries; they probably will not find it comfortable…...

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