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Depreciation Rate

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Vikas79
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RATES OF DEPRECIATION AS PER INCOME TAX ACT
‘APPENDIX I
[Effective from assessment year 2006-2007]

IT ACT

[See rule 5]
TABLE OF RATES AT WHICH DEPRECIATION IS ADMISSIBLE

Block of Assets

PART A
TANGIBLE ASSETS
I. BUILDING [See Notes 1 to 4 below this Table]
1 Buildings which are used mainly for residential purposes except hotels and 5
2 Buildings other than those used mainly for residential purposes and not
3 Buildings acquired on or after the 1st day of September, 2002 for installing
4 Purely temporary erections such as wooden structures 100
II. FURNITURE AND FITTINGS
Furniture and fittings including electrical fittings 10 [See Note 5 below this
Table]
III. MCHINERY AND PLANT
1 Machinery and plant other than those covered by sub-items (2), (3) and (8)
2 Motor cars, other than those used in a business of running them on hire, 15
3
(i) Aeroplanes - Aeroengines 40
(ii) Motor buses, motor lorries and motor taxis used in a
(iii) Commercial vehicle which is acquired by the assessee on
(iv) New commercial vehicle which is acquired on or after the
(v) New commercial vehicle which is acquired on or after the
(vi) New commercial vehicle which is acquired on or after the
(vii) Moulds used in rubber and plastic goods factories
(viii) Air pollution control equipment, being(a) Electrostatic precipitation systems
(b) Felt-filter systems
(c) Dust collector systems
(d) Scrubber-counter current/venturi/packed bed/cyclonic scrubbers

Depreciation allowance as percentage of written down value 5
10
100
100
10
15
15
40
30
40
60
60
50
30

100

(e) Ash handling system and evacuation system
(ix) Water pollution control equipment, being(a) Mechanical screen systems
(b) Aerated detritus chambers (including air compressor) (c) Mechanically skimmed oil and grease removal systems (d) Chemical feed systems and flash mixing equipment (e) Mechanical flocculators and mechanical reactors
(f) Diffused air/mechanically aerated activated sludge systems
(g) Aerated lagoon systems
(h) Biofilters
(i) Methane-recovery anaerobic digester systems
(j)
(k)
(l)
(m)
(n)
(o)

Air floatation systems
Air/steam stripping systems
Urea Hydrolysis systems
Marine outfall systems
Centrifuge for dewatering sludge
Rotating biological contractor or bio-disc

100

(p) Ion exchange resin column
(q) Activated carbon column
(x)
(a) Solidwaste, control equipment being, caustic/lime/chrome/mineral/cryolite recovery systems (b) Solidwaste recycling and resource recovery systems (xi) Machinery and plant, used in semi-conductor industry
(xia) Life saving medical equipment, being (a)
D.C. Defibrillators for internal use and pace makers (b)
Haemodialysors
(c)
Heart lung machine
(d)
Cobalt Therapy Unit
(e)
Colour Doppler
(f)
SPECT Gamma Camera
(g)
Vascular Angiography System including Digital
Subtraction Angiography
(h)
Ventilator used with anaesthesia apparatus
(i)
(j)
(k)
(l)
(m)

(n)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging System
Surgical Laser
Ventilator other than those used with anaesthesia Gamma knife
Bone marrow Transplant Equipment including silastic long standing intervenous catheters for chemotherapy 30

40

Fibre optic endorscopes including, Paediatric resectoscope/audit resectoscope,
Peritoneoscopes, Arthoscope, Microlaryngoscope,
Fibreoptic Flexible Nasal Pharyngo
Bronchoscope, Fibreoptic Flexible Laryngo
Bronchoscope, Video Laryngo Bronchoscope and
Video Oesophago Gastroscope, Stroboscope,
Fibreoptic Flexible Oesophago Gastroscope

(o)
Laparoscope (single incision)
Containers made of glass or plastic used as re-fills
Computers including computer software (See Note 7 below this Table)
Machinery and plant, used in weaving processing and garment sector of
Machinery and plant, acquired and installed on or after the 1st day of
September, 2002 in a water supply project or a water treatment system and which is put to use for the purpose of business of providing infrastructure facility under clause (i) of sub-section (4) of section 80-IA (See Notes 4 and 9 below this Table)
8
(i) Wooden Parts used in artificial silk manufacturing
(ii) Cinematograph Films - bulbs of studio lights
(iii) Match factories - Wooden match frames
(iv) Mines and quarries
(a) Tubs winding ropes, haulage ropes and sand stowing pipes
(b) Safety lamps
(v) Salt works
(vi) Flour mills - Rollers
(vii) Iron and steel industry - Rolling mill rolls
(viii) Sugar works - Rollers
(ix) Energy saving devices, being
A. Specialised boilers and furnaces :
(a) Ignifluid/fluidized bed boilers
4
5
6
7

100

50
60
50

100

100

80

80

(b) Flameless furnaces and continuous pusher type furnaces
(c) Fluidized bed type heart treatment furnaces
(d) High efficiency boilers (thermal efficiency higher than 75 per cent in case of coal fired and 80 per cent in case of oil/gas fired boilers)
B. Instrumentation and monitoring system for monitoring energy flows :
(a) Automatic electrical load monitoring systems
(b) Digital heat loss meters
(c) Micro-processor based control systems
(d) Infra-red thermography
(e) Meters for measuring heat losses, furnace oil flow, steam flow,
(f) Maximum demand indicator and clamp on power meters
(g) Exhaust gases analyser
(h) Fuel oil pump test bench
C. Waste heat recovery equipment :
(a) Economisers and feed water heaters
(b) Recuperators and air pre-heaters
(c) Heat pumps
(d) Thermal energy wheel for high and low temperature waste heart recovery
D. Co-generation systems :
(a) Back pressure pass out, controlled extraction, extraction-cum-condensing
(b) Vapour absorption refrigeration systems
(c) Organic ranking cycle power systems
(d) Low inlet pressure small steam turbines
E. Electrical equipment :
(a) Shunt capacitors and synchronous condenser systems
(b) Automatic power cut off devices (relays) mounted on individual motors
(c) Automatic voltage controller
(d) Power factor controller for AC motors
(e) Solid state devices for controlling motor speeds
(f) Thermally energy-efficient stenters (which require 800 or less kilocalories
(g) Series compensation equipment
(h) Flexible AC Transmission (FACT) devices - Thyristor controlled series
(i) Time of Day (ToD) energy meters
(j) Equipment to establish transmission highway for National Power Grid to
(k) Remote terminal units/intelligent electronic devices, computer
(l) Special energy meters for Availability Based Tariff (ABT)
F. Burners :
(a) 0 to 10 per cent excess air burners
(b) Emulsion burners
(c) Burner using air with high pre-heat temperature (above 300°C)
G. Other equipment :
(a) Wet air oxidation equipment for recovery of chemicals and heat
(b) Mechanical vapour recompressors
(c) Thin film evaporators
(d) Automatic micro-processor based load demand controllers
(e) Coal based producer gas plants
(f) Fluid drives and fluid couplings
(g) Turbo charges/super-charges
(h) Sealed radiation sources for radiation processing plants
(x) Gas Cylinders including valves and regulators
(xi) Glass manufacturing concerns - Direct fire glass melting furnaces
(xii) Mineral oil concerns :
(a) Plant used in field operations (above ground) distribution - Returnable
(b) Plant used in field operations (below ground), but not including kerbside
(xiii) Renewable energy devices being (a) Flat plate solar collectors
(b) Concentrating and pipe type soler collectors
(c) Solar cookers
(d) Solar water heaters and systems
(e) Air/Gas/fluid heating systems
(f) Solar crop driers and systems
(g) Solar refrigeration, cold storages and air conditioning systems
(h) Solar steels and desalination systems

80

80

80

80

80

80

80

60
60
60

80

(i) Solar power generating systems
(j) Solar pumps based on solar-thermal and solar-photovoltaic conversion
(k) Solar-photovoltaic modules and panels for water pumping and other
(l) Wind mills and any specially designed devices which run on wind mills
(m) Any special devices including electric generators and pumps running on
(n) Biogas-plant nd biogas-engines
(o) Electrically operated vehicles including battery powered or fuel-cell
(p) Agricultural and municipal waste conversion devices producing energy
(q) Equipment for utilising ocean waste and thermal energy
(r) Machinery and plant used in the manufacture of any of the above sub9 (i) Books owned by assessees carrying on a profession (a) Books, being annual publications
(b) Books, other than those covered by entry (a) above
(ii) Books owned by assessees carrying on business in running lending
IV. SHIPS
1 Ocean-going ships including dredgers, tugs, barges, survey launches and
2 Vessels ordinarily operating on inland waters, not covered by sub-item (3)
3 Vessels ordinarily operating on inland waters being speed boats (See Note 10 below this Table)

80

100
60
100

20
20
20

PART B
INTANGIBLE ASSETS
Know-how, Patents, Copyrights, trademarks, licences, franchises or any other business or commercial rightsof similar nature.

25

Notes:
1. "Buildings" include roads, bridges, culverts, wells and tubewells.

2. A building shall be deemed to be a building used mainly for residential purposes, if the build-up floor area thereof used for residential purposes is not less than sixty-six and two-third percent of its total built-up floor area and shall include any such building in the factory premises.
3. In respect of any structure or work by way of renovation or improvement in or in relation to a building referred to in Explanation 1 of clause (ii) of sub-section (1) of section 32, the percentage to be applied will be the percentage specified against sub-item (1) or (2) of item 1 as may be appropriate to the class of building in or in relation to which the renovation or improvement is effected. Where the structure is constructed or the work is done by the way of extension of any such building, the percentage to be applied would be such percentage as would be appropriate, as if the structure or work constituted a separate building.
4. Water treatment system includes system for desalination, demineralisation and purification of water.
5. "Electrical fittings" include electrical wiring, switches, sockets, other fittings and fans, etc.
6. "Commercial vehicle" means "heavy goods vehicle", "heavy passenger motor vehicle", "light motor vehicle", "medium goods vehicle" and "medium passenger motor vehicle" but does include "maxicab", "motor-cab", "tractor" and "road-roller". The expressions "heavy goods vehicle", "heavy passenger motor vehicle", "light motor vehicle", "medium goods vehicle", "medium passenger motor vehicle", "maxi-cab", "motor-cab", "tractor" and "road-roller" shall have the meanings respectively assigned to them in section 2 of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 (59 of 1988).

7. "Computer software" means any computer program recorded on any disc, tape, perforated media or other information storage device.
8. "TUFS" means Technology Upgradation Fund Scheme announced by the Government of India in the form of a Resolution of the Ministry of Textiles vide No.28/1/99-CTI of 31.3.1999.
9. Machinery and plant includes pipes needed for delivery from the source of supply of raw water to the plant and from the plant to the storage facility.
10. "Speed Boat" means a motor boat driven by a high speed internal combustion engine capable of propelling the boat at a speed exceeding 24 kilometers per hour in still water and so designed that when running at a speed, it will plane, i.e., its bow will rise from the water.'.…...

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Depreciation

...Depreciation Accounting 1 Types of Long-Lived Assets • Tangible asset • Asset with physical substance • Property, plant, and equipment = fixed asset. • Intangible asset • Intellectual property. • No physical substance • Examples are patent rights, copyrights 2 Amortization • View capital asset as bundle of services • Similar to prepaid expenses, cost is expensed as company benefits from the services • • • • Land - no depreciation Plant and equipment - depreciation Natural resources - depletion Intangible assets - amortization 3 Depreciation Methods • • Straight line method • (original cost - residual value) /service life Accelerated methods • Declining balance methods • Sum of the years’ or years’ digits methods 4 Declining Balance Method • Depreciation = book value * depreciation rate. • Double declining balance method = book value * 2 * straight line rate. • Straight line rate = 1/(life of asset in years). 5 Impaired Assets • • • An asset for which its remaining benefits, as measured by the sum of future cash flows the asset’s use will generate, is less than its book value If entity expects to hold asset • Write asset down to fair value If entity expects to sell asset • Write asset down to lower of cost or fair value less cost of disposal. 6 Group Depreciation n Group depreciation • Treats all similar assets as a “pool” or group rather than calculating for each item separately. • No gain or...

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