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Egocentrism in Adolescents

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By csotirosw
Words 905
Pages 4
Christopher Sotiros-Workman
6/22/14
PSY-357
Holly Curran
Egocentrism in Adolescents There are two common findings with egocentrism in adolescents, personal fable and imaginary audience (Elkind, 1967). Personal fable is a person’s belief that they are invincible, omnipotent, or otherwise unstoppable, while an imaginary audience is the belief that everyone has a greater invested interest in you than they actually do. These two forms of egocentrism explain the actions of teenagers in developing cliques, identities, and the ever developing self-identity. For these case studies two very real self-reflections have been noted and then analyzed to determine whether or not the events transpired as memory serves, or if perhaps the young teen’s mental perception was fogged by egocentric tendencies.
The All Nighter As a fourteen year old I found myself trying to fit in with any given crowd, and although birthday parties were less common they did present the opportunity for growth in the social climate. I would invite everyone I could only to find that a small handful would actually show up. At the time I felt as though I needed to impress those who attended and so rather than having a regular birthday party, I opted for an all-nighter. This meant that the party would start mid-day and run until the next morning. I can recall my mother warning me about this being a little much, and yet I did it anyway. We rented out a location in town to be locked in overnight and set up the projector for games, movies, and whatever else we wanted that night. My expectations for the night couldn’t have been higher. I learned two things that evening, and the first was that even less people would show up to an event that had no set end time. Either their parents weren’t alright with it or they had other plans that would conflict with not getting any sleep. The second and far more…...

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