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Module Handbook

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Children in Society: Past and present

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UTTGPT-30-1

Module leader: Sue Norman |

2014-2015

Aim of the handbook

The handbook is a guide for students in the Department of Education. The information in the handbook can be found on Blackboard where links to data sources are included wherever possible. Please note that the electronic version of the handbook will be kept up to date and you will be notified of any significant changes. If you have taken a hard copy of any information please remember to refer back to the electronic version to ensure that you are working with the most up to date information.

Contents

Module team contact information p.2

Module specification p.2-5

Assignment brief p.6-9

Submission details p.10

Additional information (including programme) p.11-18

Communication p.19

Advice and support p.19

1) Module team contact information:

Module Leader: Sue Norman – Room 3S405 – Sue.Norman@uwe.ac.uk 0117 328 4251
Module tutor: Mandy Lee – Room 3S406 – Mandy.Lee@uwe.ac.uk – Tel 0117 328 4279
Module tutor: Sarah Whitehouse- Room 2S407- Sarah.Whitehouse@uwe.ac.uk Tel 0117 328 4178

2) Module specific information MODULE SPECIFICATION Part 1: Basic Data | Module Title | Children in society, past and present | Module Code | UTTGPT-30-1 | Level | 1 | Version | 1 | Owning Faculty | ACE | Field | Primary, Early Childhood and Education Studies | Contributes towards | BA Hons Early Childhood | UWE Credit Rating | 30 | ETCS Credit Rating | 15 | Module Type | Standard | Pre-requisites | None | Co- requisites | None | Excluded Combinations | None | Module Entry requirements | | Valid From | September 2013 | Valid to | September 2018 | | | CAP Approval Date | 30th May 2014 | | Part 2: Learning and Teaching | Learning Outcomes | On successful completion of this module students will be able to: 1. Locate concepts of child and childhood in a historical and modern context (Component A, B); 2. Describe the ways in which the treatment of children has changed over time (Component A); 3. Reflect upon and interrogate a range of historical and contemporary sources relating to young children including images and children’s literature (Component A,B); 4. Discuss legal definitions of child and childhood (Component B); 5. Discuss concepts of needs and rights as applicable to children (Component B); 6. Critically reflect on a range of issues relating to children in society (Component B); 7. Reflect on their own views of the issues addressed (Component B). In addition the educational experience may explore, develop, and practise but not formally discretely assess the following: 8. Develop independent learning strategies and take responsibility for their own learning. 9. Locate, retrieve and critically evaluate a range of sources of information and ideas and understand the need to use appropriate sources to inform their work. | Syllabus Outline | * Conceptions of childhood, past and present * Children in history – family, work and school * History of parenting, childcare and educare * Children’s rights * ‘Deviant’ children * Education * Children and work * Sexuality and sex education * Poverty and childhood * Representations of children through images and literature * Changing childhoods | Contact Hours/Scheduled Hours | Contact time for this module will take the form of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, directed study, online engagement and e-mail contact.The following structure represents a typical delivery; the precise delivery pattern will vary from year to year.Whole cohort events: 22 hoursSmaller group events (seminars, tutorials, presentations):39 hoursGuided study (group and individual tasks, including online engagement): 11 hours | Teaching and Learning Methods | Scheduled learning: This includes lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, directed study, online engagement and e-mail contact.Independent learning: There is an expectation that students engage in approximately 2 hours of independent learning for each hour of contact time on a module. This work includes hours engaged with essential reading, additional reading around areas of particular interest, assignment preparation and completion and review of feedback. | Key Information Sets Information | Key Information Sets (KIS) are produced at programme level for all programmes that this module contributes to, which is a requirement set by HESA/HEFCE. KIS are comparable sets of standardised information about undergraduate courses allowing prospective students to compare and contrast between programmes they are interested in applying for. The table below indicates as a percentage the total assessment of the module which constitutes a -Written Exam: Unseen written exam, open book written exam, In-class testCoursework: Written assignment or essay, report, dissertation, portfolio, projectPractical Exam: Oral Assessment and/or presentation, practical skills assessment, practical examPlease note that this is the total of various types of assessment and will not necessarily reflect the component and module weightings in the Assessment section of this module description: | Reading Strategy* | Essential reading: Students are encouraged to buy at least one text for this module or to ensure that they have access to the core text in collaboration with one or more course colleagues. The key texts will be listed in the module handbook and a copy of each is provided in the Library. Where texts are available as e-books, these will be available on the library website.Further reading: Further reading is necessary for this module, and students are encouraged to explore a variety of texts and sources around a range of issues. Many resources can be accessed online. A current list of texts is given in the module guide and revised annually. Access and skills: Formal opportunities for students to develop their library and information skills are provided within the induction period and the GDP. Additional support is available through the Library Services web pages, including interactive tutorials on finding books and journals, evaluating information and referencing. Sign up workshops are also offered by the Library. Indicative reading list: The list included as part of the module specification provides an indication of the type and level of texts which students might be expected to refer to as part of the work on this module. Current advice on additional reading will be found in the module handbook and on Blackboard. | Indicative Reading List | Cunningham, H. (2005), Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500 (2nd edition). Harlow: PearsonCunningham, H. (2006), The Invention of Childhood, BBC BooksHendrick, H. (1997) Children, Childhood and English society 1880-1990 Cambridge: University Press Holland, P., (2004) Picturing childhood : the myth of the child in popular imagery London Tauris Hunt, P. (1994) An Introduction to Children’s Literature Oxford: Oxford University PressKehily, M.J. (Ed) (2004), An Introduction to Childhood Studies, Maidenhead: Open University PressMontgomery, H., Burr, R. & Woodhead, M. (2003), Changing Childhoods: Local and globalUN Convention The Rights of the Child (1989)Woodhead, M. & Montgomery, H. (eds) (2003), Understanding Childhood: an interdisciplinary approach, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd with the Open University | Part 3: Assessment | Assessment Strategy | The module learning outcomes will be assessed through an individual presentation and a written assignment. The assessment tasks will be assessed against the following Department of Education assessment criteria: A: Conceptual Domain (Core) - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student can identify and use relevant ideas and perspectives for purposes of reflection upon issues under study. B: Literature Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of appropriate literature and its relevance to the task. C: Contextual Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of contextual factors (e.g. personal, locational, historical, political etc) influencing the area of study | Identify final assessment component and element | Component B task B | % weighting between components A and B (Standard modules only) | A: | B: | | 25% | 75% | First Sit | Component A (controlled conditions)Description of each element | Element weighting(as % of component) | Individual poster presentation relating to the ways in which children’s experiences and conceptions of childhood have changed over time. Precise title to be agreed with tutor.Up to 6 minutes presentation time and an additional 2 minutes per student for questions.Assessment Criteria: AL1, BL1 and CL1 | 100% | Component B FINAL Description of each element | Element weighting | A portfolio of written tasks: Task A: An analysis of an image or text relating to young children (up to 1500 words) Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1 | 40% | Task B: An essay on a topic negotiated with module tutor and related to the learning outcomes (up to 2250 words). Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1 | 60% | | | Resit (further attendance at taught classes is not required) | Component A (controlled conditions)Description of each element | Element weighting(as % of component) | Individual poster presentation relating to the ways in which children’s experiences and conceptions of childhood have changed over time. Precise title to be agreed with tutor.Up to 6 minutes presentation time and an additional 2 minutes per student for questions. | 100% | Component B FINAL Description of each element | Element weighting | A portfolio of written tasks: Task A: An analysis of an image or text relating to young children (up to 1500 words) Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1 | 40% | Task B: An essay on a topic negotiated with module tutor and related to the learning outcomes (up to 2250 words). Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1 | 60% | If a student is permitted an EXCEPTIONAL RETAKE of the module the assessment will be that indicated by the Module Description at the time that retake commences. |

3) Assignment Brief:
See module specification above for the assignment brief as it appears in the module specification.
Component A: Presentation
Individual poster presentation relating to the ways in which children’s experiences and conceptions of childhood have changed over time. Precise title to be agreed with tutor.
Assessment Criteria: AL1, BL1 and CL1 * The presentation relates to the history of childhood covered in the first part of the module. * We will talk about this assignment in more detail in a whole cohort lecture in week 11 * There will be tutorials offered in week 12 and 13 to discuss your presentation. * Week 14 is presentation week
Component B: Portfolio of tasks Task A: An analysis of an image or text relating to young children (up to 1500 words)
Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1
As in all of the assignments for this module you have a choice. Find an image or text which interests you and relates to a theme you would like to discuss. Bear in mind that images includes art work as well as photographs, and that text can include fiction.
HAND IN TUES 25TH NOVEMBER Task B: An essay on a topic negotiated with module tutor and related to the learning outcomes (up to 2250 words).
Assessment criteria AL1, BL1, CL1
This is an essay on a topic of your choice. Most people will choose a topic we have looked at but you could consider something which cuts across more than one of these. I strongly suggest that you look at a different theme to your work for task A as it can be difficult otherwise to avoid repetition. You do need to agree your title with your tutor. The key focus for your work at this level is discussion and analysis so you need a title which will help you to move to this type of work. Even a well-written piece of work which only describes an aspect of childhood is likely to be much less successful than one which discusses.
HAND IN TUESDAY 6TH JANUARY 2015 Please note that you should not exceed the word limit for your assignments. If you do exceed the word count your marker will not read past the word count limit. This is to make the marking equitable. The word count is for the main body of your work – it does not include the reference list. You need to include the word count at the front of your assignment.
You can find the UWE word count policy at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/aboutus/policies

UWE BRISTOL
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BA (HONS) Early Childhood
PRESENTATION FEEDBACK SHEET STUDENT NO: | STUDENT NAME: | MODULE NO: UTTGPT-30-1 | AGREED RECOMMENDED GRADE: SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION OF EXAMINING BOARD | MODULE TITLE: Children in Society, past and present | | Component A: Individual poster presentation relating to the ways in which children’s experiences and conceptions of childhood have changed over time. Precise title to be agreed with tutor. Up to 6 minutes presentation time and an additional 2 minutes per student for questions. | Criteria for Assessment | Comments | A: Conceptual Domain (Core) - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student can identify and use relevant ideas and perspectives for purposes of reflection upon issues under study. | | Presentation skills | | B: Literature Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of appropriate literature and its relevance to the task. | | C: Contextual Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of contextual factors (e.g. personal, locational, historical, political etc) influencing the area of study | | Feedback

Specific areas for development 1.

2. 3. FIRST/SECOND MARKER: DATE:

UWE BRISTOL
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BA (HONS) Early Childhood
PORTFOLIO FEEDBACK SHEET STUDENT NO: | STUDENT NAME: | MODULE NO: UTTGPT-30-1 | AGREED RECOMMENDED GRADE: SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION OF EXAMINING BOARD | MODULE TITLE: Children in Society, past and present | Component B | An analysis of an image or text relating to young children (up to 1500 words) (AL1, BL1, CL1) | Criteria for Assessment | | A: Conceptual Domain (Core) - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student can identify and use relevant ideas and perspectives for purposes of reflection upon issues under study. | | Writing skills | | B: Literature Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of appropriate literature and its relevance to the task. | | C: Contextual Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of contextual factors (e.g. personal, locational, historical, political etc) influencing the area of study | | Feedback

Specific areas for development
1.
2.
3.
FIRST/SECOND MARKER: DATE:

UWE BRISTOL
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BA (HONS) Early Childhood
PORTFOLIO FEEDBACK SHEET STUDENT NO: | STUDENT NAME: | MODULE NO: UTTGPT-30-1 | AGREED RECOMMENDED GRADE: SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION OF EXAMINING BOARD | MODULE TITLE: Children in Society, past and present | Component B | An essay on a topic negotiated with module tutor and related to the learning outcomes (up to 2250 words). (AL1, BL1, CL1) | Criteria for Assessment | | A: Conceptual Domain (Core) - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student can identify and use relevant ideas and perspectives for purposes of reflection upon issues under study. | | Writing skills | | B: Literature Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of appropriate literature and its relevance to the task. | | C: Contextual Domain - L1 The assignment demonstrates that the student has an awareness of contextual factors (e.g. personal, locational, historical, political etc) influencing the area of study | |
Feedback

Specific areas for development
1.

2.

3.

FIRST/SECOND MARKER: DATE: 4) Submission details
Please note that the submission deadlines are absolute and based on UWE server time, therefore you are strongly advised to submit work well ahead of the deadline dates to avoid situations where penalties could be incurred. If penalities are imposed it will result in late work submissions being capped or not accepted for marking. You will receive informal feedback verbally through all teaching sessions - ensure you listen carefully. Each assessment you submit will be returned to you with written feedback (see examples above), and consists of comments made by tutors on students’ assessed work which enables students to understand how they have met the defined assessment criteria and identifying areas for further improvement. Feedback on, and an outcome for, assessment shall be provided individually or in groups in an appropriate format and within four working weeks (excluding student vacation periods) following the deadline for submission of the assessment concerned. Where the period is longer than four working weeks students should be informed of the deadline for the provision of feedback and the rationale for the extension. Outcomes which have not been confirmed by an examining board shall be considered as provisional. Component A – presentations
Presentations are in your timetabled slot in week 14 (week beginning 27th October)
Assessment feedback by the end of week 15

Component B – portfolio of tasks

Submission date Component B task A: Tuesday November 25th 2pm Submission date Component B task B: Tuesday 6th January 2015 2pm Assessment feedback: Task A – Friday 12th Dec Task B - Monday 3rd February This is to be submitted online via Blackboard. You must upload the appropriate file against the right element in Blackboard and you should check your submission once you have done this. Please do not leave your submission until the last minute – Blackboard support are fabulously helpful if you do have any problems but there is a limit to what they can do in a short space of time! Go to the following guidance pages to check how to do this. http://info.uwe.ac.uk/online/blackboard/students/guides/assignments/view-submit.asp http://info.uwe.ac.uk/online/blackboard/students/guides/assignments/before.asp If you have any problems with this then contact Blackboard support at blackboard@uwe.ac.uk Feedback will be given in the form of video feedback. If you would prefer to receive written feedback please state this in the comments section when you upload your assignment.

Awarding Marks
The following guidance will be used by your tutors in the process of awarding grades for your assessed work.
For Levels 1,2 and 3, 40% is a pass.

% | Coverage of criteria | Selection of content | Reflectivity | Analysis & evaluation | Reference to literature &/or professional experience | Module learning outcomes | 0% | Failure through non-submission. | | | | | | 1-27.9 | Failure to meet any of the stated criteria | Substantial proportion of the work wholly irrelevant | | | Minimal reference | | 28-34.9 | Failure to meet most of the stated criteria | Largely irrelevant | | | Inappropriate reference | | 35-39.9 | Unsatisfactory coverage | Substantial degree of irrelevance and inaccuracy | Acknowledged but lacking in substance | A marked absence | Use of secondary sources only | Little acknowledgement | 40-43.9 | Barely satisfactory coverage | Substantial degree of irrelevance and inaccuracy | Acknowledged but lacking substance | Little | Use of secondary sources only | Little more than acknowledgement | 44-46.9 | Adequate relevant coverage | Some irrelevance and/or inaccuracies | Apparent | Minimal | Insular | Referred to appropriately | 47-49.9 | Adequate relevant coverage with some development but little interpretation apparent | Some irrelevance and/or inaccuracies | Apparent with beginning of development | Erratic | Insular | | 50-53.9 | Largely relevant | | Satisfactory level | Some attempt with moderate success | Largely relevant range of sources but mostly secondary | Acknowledged and some implications reviewed | 54-56.9 | Largely relevant | Main issues or principles identified explicitly | Satisfactory level | Attempted with moderate success | Range of sources, all relevant but mostly secondary | Acknowledged with some implications reviewed | 57-59.9 | Largely relevant | Main issues or principles identified explicitly | Satisfactory level | Attempted with success | Range of sources, all relevant but mostly secondary | Acknowledged with some implications reviewed | 60-62.9 | Coverage of all criteria with some interpretation apparent. | Main issues or principles elaborated | Creditable degree | Good, coherently and fluently expressed | Good range of sources utilised, with some being original | Referred to, and their implications at appropriate points |

% | Coverage of criteria | Selection of content | Reflectivity | Analysis & evaluation | Reference to literature &/or professional experience | Module learning outcomes | 63-66.9 | Extensive coverage of all criteria with some interpretation apparent | Main issues or principles clearly elaborated | Creditable degree | Good, coherently and fluently expressed | Good range of sources utilised, with some being original | Referred to, and their implications at appropriate points | 67-69.9 | Extensive coverage of all criteria with some interpretation apparent | Main issues or principles are clearly elaborated | Clear, cogent and reflective argument | Good, coherently and fluently expressed demonstrating a scholarly presentation of ideas and an astute sense of audience | Good range of sources utilised and the use of primary sources is prioritised | Referred to, and their implications, appropriate to the submission | 70-75.9 | Comprehensive coverage of all criteria, many of which have been explicitly interpreted | Extensive interrelating of alternative viewpoints | Abundant evidence | Clearly and appropriately expressed | Judicious selection from, a wide range of sources, many of which are original | Referred to and engaged critically with their implications appropriate to the submission | 76-82.9 | Comprehensive coverage of all criteria, many of which have been explicitly interpreted | Extensive interrelating of alternative viewpoints with the introduction of novel or original ideas | In depth | Clearly and appropriately expressed and a confident discussion of ideas and texts | Judicious selection from, a wide range of sources, many of which are original | Referred to and engaged critically with their implications appropriate to the submission | 83-89.9 | Comprehensive coverage of all criteria, all of which have been explicitly interpreted | Extensive interrelating of alternative viewpoints with the development of novel or original ideas | In depth.Ability to engage with appropriate dimensions of genre and discourse | Confident integration of appropriate ideas and concepts in a succinct and elegant manner | Judicious selection from, a wide range of sources, many of which are original | Referred to and engaged critically with their implications appropriate to the submission | 90-100 | Meeting all of the requirements for the 82.9% classification | | | Creative and unique synthesis of ideas and concepts including an evaluation of the methodological approach adopted | | |

5) Additional information and reading strategies Readings
Key texts:
You will need to have ready access to the following text:
Kehily MJ (2013) Understanding Childhood: a cross-disciplinary approach (2ND edition edited by Kehily M J) Bristol Policy Press

A useful book which is available in the library but has now gone out of print is
Woodhead, M. & Montgomery, H. (2003), Understanding Childhood: an interdisciplinary approach, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd with the Open University
Many of the texts are available online. Video sources are available through Box of Broadcasts on the UWE library website.
The reading and tasks against any given week are to be completed IN ADVANCE OF THE SEMINARS FOR THAT WEEK.
Study groups
You will be asked to work in study groups in some seminars to share thoughts on different readings. If you have any difficulty understanding any of the readings then please bring it along to discuss – others will have found it difficult too.
All of the members of your study group need to read your group text (or watch the video if you have a video task). You will need to identify key points and questions/issues to raise.
Referencing
A guide to referencing can be found at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/studysupport/studyskills/referencing.aspx

Programme
Please note that there may be some revisions to this programme. Please check on the announcements on Blackboard, particularly if you have missed the lecture/seminar the previous week.
Tutorial times have been indicated. These will usually take place in scheduled sessions and may be in groups, pairs or individually as arranged. Wk | Lectures in 1L17Monday 12-2pm | Seminars/guided study | Guided study / Reading / Tasks – | 9 | Introduction to module including family/local research (SN) | Seminar 1: What is childhood? | Kehily MJ (2013) Understanding Childhood: a cross-disciplinary approach (2ND edition edited by Kehily M J) Bristol Policy Press p55-64/ reading A p89 | | Childhood to 1800 – overview and sources - How do we know? (ML) | Seminar 2: ReadingAcademic skills development - Reading / key points | | | | | | 10 | Historical constructions of childhood to the 20th Century (SW) | Seminar 1: Childhood to 1800 and constructions of childhoodReading and video feedback /discussions / questions | For week 10 seminar 1: Childhood to 1800 1. Too Much Too Young – Children of the Middle Ages, BBC4 (24th August 2011), available online – go to the library website and then TV on demand to access Box of Broadcasts: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/library/usingthelibrary/findthings/searchforthingsa-z/tvon-demand.aspx This looks at the time just before the period we are studying and provides an excellent introduction to the subject. 2. A Renaissance Education’, BBC4, available online on Box of Broadcasts via the library website (This only refers to the education of the elite, but it also tells us something about wider changes in childhood.)For week 10 seminar 2: 1800 – 1900 a) Ian Hislop's Age of the Do-Gooders – available on BoB 9:00pm on Monday 6th December 2010 b) The Children Who Built Victorian Britain – available on BoB 10:30pm on Wednesday 10th August 2011 | | 1800 – 1900 From work to education (SW) | Seminar 2: 1800 -1900 – Student presentations on video materials – key points, questionsFamily/local research feedback in groupsWhat themes have emerged?What have we found out about children’s lives and conceptions of childhood | | | Lectures | | | 11 | 1900 – 1945: 20th Century childhood (SW)Social changesCaring for children.Concepts of childhood. | Seminar 1: 1800 – 1900 – What can we find out from art, literature and written sources? | For week 11 seminar 1: 1. ‘The Victorians’, BBC4 – Jeremy Paxman – available on BoB Pay particular attention to 0 – 6 mins which provides a great introduction to the period. 2. Reading: Kehily MJ (2013) Understanding Childhood: a cross-disciplinary approach (2ND edition edited by Kehily M J) Bristol Policy Press p67-87For week 11 seminar 2:Bring in some children’s texts from the period to discuss. | | Presentations (SN) – Exploring poster presentation titlesPlanning a poster together. Q&A | Seminar 2: Childhood in literature – 19th and 20th centuriesExplore a children’s text from the period in your study group. Gather quotes, thoughts and questions. Texts you might consider (but please bring others)Charles Kingsley (1863) The Water BabiesCharles Dickens (1838) Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens (1843) A Christmas CarolCharlotte Bronte (1847) Jane EyreLewis Carroll (1865) Alice’s Adventures in WonderlandBeatrix Potter (1902) The Tale of Peter RabbitAngela Brazil (1906) The Fortunes of Philippa Arthur Ransome (1930) Swallows and AmazonsP.L.Travers (1934) Mary PoppinsEnid Blyton (1944) The Island of Adventure | | | | | | 12 | 20th Century childrearing (ML) | Seminar 1: Academic skills work - ReferencingFocus on presentations/ tutorials | For week 12 seminars: 1. Hendrick, H. (1997), Children, childhood and English Society, 1880 – 1990, ch. 3 Parent-child relationships (Digitised)In library: 305.2309 HEN 2. Cunningham, H. (2006), The Invention of Childhood, Ch.6: Post-war childhood (Digitised)In library – book or CD versions: 305.23 CUN 3. The social construction of childhood - Kehily (2013) p226- 239For week 12: Tutorials on presentationsCome to your seminar/tutorial in week 12/13 prepared to discuss your presentation – title and readings | | Post WW2 – modern childhoods /constructions of childhood (SW). | Seminar 2: constructions of childhood | | | | Seminar 3: Small group tutorials (week 12 and 13) to help you prepare for your presentations. You will be expected to attend both sessions and work with your group to share resources and ideas. | | | | | | 13 | Pulling it all together: How have children’s experiences and conceptions of childhood changed over time?Current issues...what next? (ML) | Seminar 1: Small group tutorials to help you prepare for your presentations | For week 13 seminar1:Tutorials on presentations - Come to your seminar/tutorial in week 13 prepared to discuss your presentation – title and readings For week 13 seminar 2:Come to your seminar with your draft poster or your poster notes to run through. | | Evaluating sources – news, websites, journals, books? (SN) | Seminar 2: Peer-review draft presentations (tutor-supported guided study) | | 14 | Session to answer any queries you may have re your presentations (12-2pm in 1L17, SN) | Presentations | | 15 | Children’s rights (SN) | Seminar 1: Children’s rights – Debate on smacking.(There is no seminar 2 this week as we had an additional slot in week 12 to help you to prepare for your presentations.) | For week 15 seminar 1: Rights 1. Durrant,J.(1999) Generation Without Smacking: The impact of Sweden’s ban on physical punishment. London: Save the Childrenhttp://www.savethechildren.org.uk/resources/online-library/generation-without-smacking-impact-sweden%E2%80%99s-ban-physical-punishment 2. Durrant J and Ensom R (2012). "Physical punishment of children: Lessons from 20 years of research" CMAJ 2012. Available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3447048/pdf/1841373.pdf 3. CRAE & Save the Children UK (2004) It Hurts Inside: Young Children Talk about Smacking. Available online at http://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/assets/childrendocs/UK%20ItHurtsYouInside.pdf 4. Kehily MJ (2013) Understanding Childhood: a cross-disciplinary approach (2ND edition edited by Kehily M J) Bristol Policy Press p186-192To support week 15 lecture: Children’s bodies: Childhood obesity: are we missing the big picture?W. Maziak, K. D. Ward and M. B. Stockton (2007), Available from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2007.00376.x/pdf or via a google searchBBC RADIO 4 August 2012 Sould obese children be taken into care? Listen to the programme at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01lv5v9 and read the background information at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19267308On Box of Broadcasts, look for ‘Generation XXL’ | | Children’s bodies (SN)andOverview of Component B Task A (SN) | | | | | | | 16 | Sexualisation of childhood (ML) | Seminar 1 –Group working/tutorialsAcademic skills support – planning your image analysis to be handed in Tues November 25th | The tutorials in wk 16 are intended to support your work for the task for component B part A. The more prepared you are then the more useful these will be. Prioritise bringing your image or text and your readings to support component B, Task ATo support week 16 lecture - Sexuality and sex education 1. DfE (2011), Letting Children be Children - Report of an Independent Review of the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood . Available online at: http://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/CM%208078 2. Robinson, K.H. (2013), Innocence, Knowledge and the Construction of Childhood. Abingdon: Routledge. This will shortly be available as an e-book. In the meantime, partial text available on Google books at http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=DeSGCVHn8wUC&pg=PA159&lpg=PA159&dq=%E2%80%98Difficult+citizenship%E2%80%99:+The+precarious+relationships+between+childhood,+sexuality+and+access+to+knowledge&source=bl&ots=cFPS1ORihW&sig=gkUS9ajtxlJl1CMwg25MDOH-Ya8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=PNM4UvHVMoLB0QWhn4BA&ved=0CFUQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=%E2%80%98Difficult%20citizenship%E2%80%99%3A%20The%20precarious%20relationships%20between%20childhood%2C%20sexuality%20and%20access%20to%20knowledge&f=false and on an Amazon review at:http://www.amazon.co.uk/Innocence-Knowledge-Construction-Childhood-contradictory/dp/0415607639#reader_0415607639 3. Kelley, P., Buckingham, D., & Davies, H. (1999). Talking dirty: Children, sexual knowledge and television. Childhood, 8(2), 221-242. 4. Blaise, M. (2010), ‘Kiss and Tell: Gendered narratives and childhood sexuality’, in Australasian Journal of Early Childhood. March 2010, Vol.35 Issue 1, p.1-9 5. Brooks, L. (2006), The Story of Childhood: growing up in modern Britain.p.50-84: Lois This chapter includes thoughts on childhood innocence and also on photographing children | | Brief generic feedback on presentations (ML). | Seminar 2 –Group working/tutorialsYou are expected to attend both sessions and work on your assessment, utilising resources that will be available for you | | | | | | 17 | Children and work (SW) | Seminar 1: Poverty Definitions, impacts and policy implications | For week 17 seminar 1 – Poverty: 1. Montgomery, H., Burr, R. & Woodhead, M. (2003), Changing Childhoods: Local and global, In library: 305.23 MONChapter 2: Children, poverty and social inequalityP46-55, p80-85, p89-91 (Digitised) 2. Spencer,N.(2008) Health Consequences of Poverty for Children. End Child Povertyhttp://www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/files/Health_consequences_of_Poverty_for_children.pdf 3. Field,F.(2010) The Foundation Years: preventing poor children becoming poor adults. London: HM Governmentwww.frankfield.com/campaigns/poverty-and-life-changes.aspx 4. Brooks, L. (2006), The Story of Childhood: growing up in modern Britain. p.85-123: AllanaThis chapter is about a girl who is growing up in poverty. For week 17 seminar 1 – Work:Montgomery, H., Burr, R. & Woodhead, M. (2003), Changing Childhoods: Local and global, Education as endless labor: p.35 – 37‘Kids for Sale: Stacey Dooley’- available on BoB, 9:00pm, Thursday 1st October 2009 on BBC THREE | | Children and poverty (SW) | Seminar 2: WorkChild labour in the UK and developing countries | | | | | | 18 | Children and Crime (SN) | Seminar 1: CriminalityDiscussion on whether we should raise the age of criminal responsibility | For week 18 seminars - Criminality: 1. Gerhardt,S.(2004) Why Love Matters ( e-book) p.167-191 2. Jacobsen J (2010) Punishing Disadvantage [online] available from www.prisonreformtrust.org 3. James A and Jenks (1996) Public Perceptions of Childhood Criminology in The British Journal of Sociology Vol 47 (2)p315-331 in conjunction with the London School of Economics (can be accessed online through the library) 4. ‘Horizon: Are You Good or Evil?’ Available on BoB - 9:00pm on Wednesday 7th September 2011 | | Component B, part B- the essay (SN) | Seminar 2: | | | | | | 19 | Sex education (ML) | Seminar 1: Sexuality, innocence and conceptions of childhood | For week 19 seminar 1 – Readings from week 16For week 19 seminar 2 - Education: 1. Staggs, L.(2012) Ch 10: The Rhetoric and reality of a national strategy for early education and assessment, in Miller, L. & Hevey, D (eds) 2012) Policy Issues in the Early Years, London: Sage (Digitised) 2. Sharp, C. (2002), School Starting Age: European Policy and Recent Research
Paper presented at the LGA Seminar ‘When Should Our Children Start School?’ www.nfer.ac.uk/publications/other-publications/conference-papers/pdf_docs/PaperSSF.pdf 3. Ken Robinson – a short talk with animation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFcDGpL4U 4. Do children need teachers? The Hole-in-the-wall project http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html - from 6 mins (all worth watching) 5. Summerhill School – where lessons are optional -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdwjvxcJHTA 6. Montgomery, H., Burr, R. & Woodhead, M. (2003), Changing Childhoods: Local and global, p35-37 Education as endless laborFor week 20 tutorialsBegin to develop your essay title and gather the readings you are planning to use to support your work | | Education (SW) | Seminar 2: Education | | | | | | 20 | The changing nature of childhood- is childhood disappearing? Pulling it all together (SN) | Tutorials to help you prepare for essay- PLEASE ALSO DOWNLOAD AND BRING YOUR FEEDBACK FOR COMPONENT B PART A WITH YOUThere are three tutorials scheduled this week. You are expected to attend all sessions during which you will have an individual tutorial. The rest of the time you will be able to share ideas and resources with your peers | For week 20 tutorialsMake a start on reading for and planning your essay and bring all of these materials to the seminars in week 20. For week 20 lecture Kehily (2013) chapter 1 | | Writing support/reviewing work- what does ‘good’ look like? | | | 24 | Hand in date for Component B part B: Tuesday 6th January 2015 | | | | |

6) Communication
Throughout your time with us, you will receive regular communication from your module leaders, and also administrative staff, and it is your responsibility to ensure that you read everything that you are sent, and act upon it where appropriate.
The main communication channel used is Blackboard for all the modules you are currently studying. Blackboard provides the main communication channel for module specific information and these too should be checked regularly for new content and announcements.
Please see http://info.uwe.ac.uk/myUWE/guidance/default.asp for further information on all aspects of your myUWE portal.

7) Advice and support
There are a range of facilities and services available to go for advice and support depending on what the issue is. Remember-asking for help at the earliest possible stage will help you in the long run. Your first point of call should always be your Academic Personal tutor, as they will be able to sign post you to the right services and will be able to deal specific matters relating to teaching and learning.
However you are more than welcome to talk to other members of UWE staff depending on who you feel most comfortable talking to.

Please find further information and links to advice in the programme handbook.…...

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