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Ethnic and Ego Identity

In: English and Literature

Submitted By redwater12
Words 6211
Pages 25
International Journal of Intercultural Relations 24 (2000) 777–790

The relationship of ethnic identity and ego identity status among adolescents and young adults
Curtis W. Branch*, Priti Tayal, Carla Triplett
Columbia University, New York, USA

Abstract A multi-ethnic sample of 248, ages 13–26, was used to examine the effects of age, gender, and ethnic group membership on ethnic identity and ego identity scores. Subjects were recruited from college and public schools in a large northeastern metropolitan area. The multigroup ethnic identity measure (MEIM) was used to assess ethnic identity and ego identity status was measured by the extended objective measure of ego identity status (EOMEIS). An age by ethnic group design was employed. Consistent findings of significant ethnic group differences in levels of ethnic identity were observed. Age and ethnic group were found to contribute differently to ethnic identity and ego identity status. The relationship between ethnic identity and ego identity status was found to be pronounced among subjects of color but not as dramatic as hypothesized. # 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Ego identity status; Ethnic identity; Adolescents; Adults

1. Introduction The ways adolescents attempt to resolve their identity crises are idiosyncratic to each individual and their life circumstances. Despite such diversity of approach to the ‘‘Who am I?’’ question, some variables seem to consistently contribute to the adolescent identity resolution process. Family type (one- vs. two-parents), socioeconomic status, and gender are variables that play a role in the adolescent’s process in clear, consistent, and empirically verifiable ways.
*Correspondence address: 70 Anderson St #IF, Hackensackd, NJ 07601, USA. Tel.: +1-212-543-5298; fax: +1-212-543-6660. E-mail address: cwb15@columbia.edu (C.W. Branch). 0147-1767/00/$ -…...

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