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Evaluate the View That New Cults and Sects Are Replacing Traditional Religion as the Means for Experiencing and Expressing Religious Belief in the World Today

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Evaluate the view that new cults and sects are replacing traditional religion as the means for experiencing and expressing religious belief in the world today
In this essay, I will be evaluating the view that cults and sects are replacing traditional religion as for expressing religious belief in the world today. To do this I will be referring to a number of sociologists view on the idea of sects and cults.
New religious movements such as sects and cults have become more common over the years. Many people are becoming influenced by these religious groups which tell citizens in society if they join them they will lead a better life. Many sociologists have argued that NRMs are increasing in size and popularity due to unjust events people are seeing in modern society.
To begin with, many sociologists have argued that NRMs are no big influence on society and are just really to some extent a way of showing societies change, which is sure to happen over the years anyway. Wallis identified three main kinds of new religious movements. These are world affirming, world accommodating and world rejecting groups. Sociologists have argued the one that is short lived than the rest is the world rejecting. This group is usually classed as a sect or cult in which they are always highly critical of the outside world and demand significant commitment from their members. An Example of one of these is the Unification church (the Moonies) founded in Korea. They reject the mundane the secular world as evil and has strong moral rules such as no smoking or drinking. These groups are exclusive often share possessions and seek to regulate member’s identities to that of the greater whole. They are often millenarian in which they are expecting divine intervention to change the world. World rejecting groups such as the Moonies can be said to be short lived and don’t have a big influence in…...

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