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How Far Sociologists Agree That Shared Norms and Values Make Social Order Possible

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How far sociologists agree that shared norms and values make social order possible

Social norms are group-held beliefs about how members should behave in a given context.Sociologists describe norms as informal understandings that govern society’s behaviors. Social values are what we consider to be important in social interactions between people.
Functionalist theory assumes that a certain degree of order and stability is essential for the survival of social systems. Without it, society may expose to chaos and disorder.Functionalists believe that social order exists in the concept of value consensus to a large extent. Functionalists believe that without collective conscience/ shared values and beliefs, achieving social order is impossible and social order is crucial for the well-being of society. They believe that value consensus forms the basic integrating principle in society. And if members of society have shared values they therefore also have similar identities, this helps cooperation and avoids conflict.
Marx's theories of what he believes is a capitalist society were that of two separate classes - The rich ruling class and the working class or in layman's term the bosses and the workers. The bosses are seen as the ruling class as they exploit the workers by forcing them to over produce supplies, which when after paying the workers a menial wage, they sell off the overstocks to make a profit. This can and always will cause conflict between the two classes because the workers need to work to support their families so carry on working and conforming to the rules and laws of the ruling class, even though they are treated as second class citizens. The ruling class also use the police and the military to threaten the working class rebels with force if they try and retaliate against the bosses which is a form of social control.
Although Marxists views of…...

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