Free Essay

Jhshj

In: Social Issues

Submitted By tin0712
Words 15477
Pages 62
The Effects of Romantic Relationships on the Academic
Performance of University of the Philippines – Cebu College
Students (A.Y. 2011-2012)

A Research Paper
Submitted to the
Humanities Division
University of the Philippines Cebu College
Lahug, Cebu City

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for the Course
Communication II

Researchers:
Alma Mae J. Bernales
Fretzy Colonia

Adviser:
Ms. Crina Tanongon

October 2011

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We, researchers would like to express our sincere appreciation to the following people who offered their untiring support and help to make this research complete.
To, Ms. Crina Tanongon, for her constructive criticism, patience in checking the grammatical errors, untiring effort in sharing us new ideas, and encouragement which inspired us to make this study a success.
To our parents, Mr. & Mrs. Alberto Bernales and Mr. & Mrs. Efren Colonia who sustained and motivated us throughout this whole semester, for willingly giving us the moral and financial support for this study, and for the patience in understanding us when we have our sleepless nights while making this study.
To our fiends, who were really there to make us smile when things gone wrong, and for their cheers and inspirational comments when we were so down.
To our respondents, the BSCS-II students, for their participation in this study and for their time and effort in answering the questionnaires sincerely.
Most of all, to the Almighty God who gives us the strength to do this research, for giving us the enlightenment to pursue this course.
It was really wonderful to have all your support during the process of completing this study. Thank you so much.

RESEARCHERS’ PROFILE

Name: Alma Mae, Bernales
Age: 18
Sex: Female
Civil Status: Single
Date of Birth: June 2, 1993
Place of Birth: Poblacion, Jagna, Bohol
Religion: Roman Catholic
Nationality: Filipino

Educational Background
Elementary: Tugas Elementary School
High School: Holy Name University
Candijay High School
College: University of the Philippines Cebu College
BS COMPUTER SCIENCE II

Name: Fretzy Colonia
Age: 17
Sex: Female
Civil Status: Single
Date of Birth: July 16, 1994
Place of Birth: Macaas, Catmon, Cebu
Religion: Roman Catholic
Nationality: Filipino

Educational Background
Elementary: Macaas Elementary School
High School: Gabriel Jurado Foundation School, Inc.
College: University of the Philippines Cebu College
BS COMPUTER SCIENCE II

ABSTRACT
The study aimed to determine the effects of romantic relationship to the academic performance of UP Cebu BS Computer Science 2 students. The study was conducted to determine whether or not there is a relationship between academic performance and motivation as well as association with anxiety, time management in studying and time spent with their partners.
The variables were investigated using a descriptive survey method by the aid of a researcher made questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in analyzing the relationship between variables. The data were subjected with Pearson
Product Moment Correlation and T-test.
It was found out that the time management of the respondents was imbalanced which entails that they were more focused in their romantic relationship than in studying.
Anxiety and the time spent with the partner were found to be significantly related to academic performance. However, since the results revealed that UP BS Computer
Science 2 students who were involved in a relationship (during the academic year 20102011) have lower anxiety level as students, the researchers concluded that the time spent with the partner have the most significant effect to their academic performance. It was also found that the level of motivation has no significant relationship with the academic achievement of the respondents.
It is recommended that a parallel study will be conducted with larger samples since the study is limited to ten (10) respondents only.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Title Page...........................................................................................................................i
Acknowledgement.............................................................................................................ii
Researchers’ Profile.........................................................................................................iii
Abstract.............................................................................................................................v
List of Tables....................................................................................................................ix
List of Figures.................................................................................................................x
Chapter I: Introduction
Rationale................................................................................................................1
Statement of the Problem......................................................................................4
Objectives of the Study………………………………………………………………..5
Significance of the Study.......................................................................................5
Chapter II: Review of Related Literature..........................................................................8
Chapter III: Study Framework
Theoretical Framework........................................................................................20
Conceptual Framework........................................................................................24
Operational Framework.......................................................................................28

Chapter IV: Methodology
Research Design.................................................................................................29
Respondents and Locale of the Study.................................................................29
Sampling Procedure............................................................................................30
Data Collection.....................................................................................................30
Instrumentation....................................................................................................30
Statistical Treatment of Data……….....................................................................31
Chapter V: Presentation, Interpretation and Analysis of Data
Respondents’ Profile...........................................................................................34
Status of Time Management...............................................................................37
Levels of Motivation……......................................................................................39
Levels of Anxiety……..........................................................................................42
Correlation of Time Management and Academic Performance………………....46
Correlation of Motivation/Anxiety and Academic Performance...........................51

Chapter VI: Conclusions and Recommendations
Summary of Findings...........................................................................................56
Conclusions.........................................................................................................59
Recommendations...............................................................................................61
REFERENCES...............................................................................................................62
APPENDICES
A.

Questionnaire............................................................................................65

B.

Sample (Answered Questionnaire)...........................................................67

LIST OF TABLES
TABLE

TITLE

PAGE

LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE

TITLE

PAGE

Page |1

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION
RATIONALE
During adolescence, teens become interested and involved in dating because of the desire to belong with others. As a result, it is clear that over the time, romantic relationships gain in importance. Adolescents crave to have an intimate romantic relationship to which love is given and received without restriction. It is according to the need to belong theory by which individuals have the determination to connect with others in enduring, close relationships. Furthermore, the theory states that humans
“share” the same need to be a part or connected with other individuals, and claims that all individuals may live life better if they are connected. Myers (2010) supported the need to belong theory by asserting that people who find a person complimenting their needs to whom they can share their problems with, makes those people more acknowledgeable. Belongingness is supported by close, intimate relationship which tends to be healthier and happier.
Because of this need to belong, we can see nowadays that most university students are synchronizing their time in both academic and romantic aspect. Engaging themselves in this romantic relationship enables them to feel that someone cares for them, shows affection to them, loves them, etc. In fact, Furman (2002) reported that romantic relationships become more and more significant to adolescents in their social world as they also develop from puberty towards late adolescence in which it shows how prevalent is romantic relationship among adolescents.

Moreover, some students on the University of the Philippines Cebu College have also involved themselves in a romantic relationship. Having been in an institution which promotes honor and excellence among its students gave them a great challenge to maintain a good academic performance. Considering that each professor has higher expectations of the students, an increase of workloads which includes projects, school papers, reports and challenging exams were given. Therefore, being college students of
UP Cebu College gives them more responsibility and it requires a great amount of time and attention.
In addition, Myers (2010) said that relationships also consume much of the life of university students. It is proven in the study of Mehl & Pennebaker (2003) conducted to
11 participants (using Electronically Activated Recorder for each participant) coming from the University of Texas at Austin, that 28 percent of the students’ waking hours were spent just by talking to their romantic partners and it did not include the time they spent in listening to their romantic partners. Another study (Steinhauer & Holson, 2008) cited by Myers (2010) found that an average American 13-18 years old sent or received
1,742 test messages per month. Most often these young texters have been involved in romantic relationships.
Furthermore, research conducted by Campbell & Oliver(1994) found benefits in having a romantic relationship such as “companionship, feeling of happiness or elation, exclusivity, feeling loved or loving another, intimacy, self-growth and self-understanding, and more positive self-esteem”(). These benefits found in a romantic relationship were said to be the cause of motivation of the students in pursuing their studies.

However, Campbell & Oliver (1994) also pointed out some costs which are found in a romantic relationship, namely: stress and worry about the relationship, social and nonsocial sacrifices, increased dependence on the partner, fights, time and effort investment, and feeling worse about the self which were said to be the cause of anxiety of the students.
Having been in these situations, UP Cebu students who are in a romantic relationship may be faced with the challenge in maintaining a good academic performance as “Iskolars ng Bayan”. UP students have greater responsibility to do well in their studies since it is the nation which subsidized most of its students to provide them a quality education.
Consequently, a question on the effect of romantic relationship among the students involved, whether they can manage their time efficiently or not still remains.
Moreover, determining the vital role of motivation and anxiety in the life of the romantic partners and how they affect their academic performance still remain a problem.
In order to answer these problems, this study was aimed to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of UP BS Computer Science 2 students who are involved in a romantic relationship. In this, status of time management was investigated as well as the levels of motivation and anxiety of the students. Lastly, this study aimed to determine if there is a relationship between the time management, levels of motivation and anxiety and the academic performance of the students.

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
The main thrust of the study was to determine the effect of romantic relationships to the academic performance of male and female BS Computer Science 2 students of the University of the Philippines Cebu College (A.Y. 2011-2012, First Sem) who were involved in a romantic relationship during the academic year 2010-2011.
Specifically, this study sought to answer the following questions:
1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of:
a. gender,
b. general weighted average in the A.Y 2010-2011 1st sem,
c. general weighted average in the A.Y. 2010-2011 2nd sem?
2. What is the status of time management of the respondents:
a. in studying,
b. with their partner?
3. What is the level of anxiety of the respondents in playing their role as a student? 4. What is the level of motivation of the respondents in playing their role as a student? 5. Is there a significant relationship between the academic performance and time management of the respondents?
6. Is there a significant correlation between academic performance and :
a. levels of anxiety,
b. levels of motivation?

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
The main objective of the study was to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of UP Cebu College BS Computer Science 2
(A.Y. 2011-2012, First Sem) male and female students who were involved in a romantic relationship during the academic year 2010-2011.
In order to answer the main problem, the study has the following specific objectives: 1. To determine the profile of the respondents in terms of:





gender, general weighted average in the A.Y. 2010-2011 first sem, general weighted average in the A.Y. 2010-2011 second sem.

2. To determine the status of the time management of the respondents:



in studying, with their partner.

3. To determine the levels of motivation of the respondents in playing their role as a student.
4. To determine the level of anxiety of the respondents in playing their role as a student. 5. To determine whether there is a significant correlation between time management of the respondents and their academic performance.

6. To determine whether there is a significant correlation between the levels of motivation/anxiety of the respondents and their academic performance.

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY
This study aimed to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of BS Computer Science 2 students of academic year 20112012. This found out how the UP BS Computer Science 2 students manage their time in which study and romantic side is involved. Additionally, it determines the levels of motivation and anxiety of the respondents.
This study highlights the effect of time management, motivation and anxiety level of students who are involved in romantic relationship on their academic performance.
The result of this study would alarm the student and raise their awareness on the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of a student especially on its negative effects. These concluded data would also make the students who are involved in romantic relationship assess their time management between romantic and academic aspects. Findings of this study would also raise the awareness of the parents of the students who are synchronizing their time in both academic works and romantic aspect.
These findings could benefit them so that they could guide their children on how to balance time wisely, and as parents, they are tasked to motivate their children to prioritize their study and set-aside/minimize factors of romantic relationship(i.e., more

frequent interaction with the partner) which can affect the academic performance of their children. For the teachers, the information that they would get in this study would help them guide and give proper attention to their students who are involved in romantic relationship so that teachers could also help in increasing the academic performance of their students not just by teaching them lessons on the course/subjects they handled.

CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE
Before going into the main variables of the study, the researchers discuss in the first part why do adolescents get involve in romantic relationships and how these relationships contribute in the growth and development of adolescents. In the next part, the researchers talk about the connection of independent variables in this study such as the romantic relationship which involves time, motivation and anxiety. These three variables were looked into to determine or to see if there is relationships exist between romantic relationship the academic performance of individuals and its effect. In the last part of the chapter, the researchers try to evaluate previous studies related to the topic of this study.
Humans, particularly adolescents get involve in romantic relationships with variety of reasons. According to Aristotle, humans are “social animals” which made them long to form an intimate relationship in which love can be given and received freely which the psychologists called “the need to belong” (Myers, 2010). Rest assured of the love and care given by the persons close to them, they are secured with the trust and confidence that they are acceptable to individuals whom they can depend on for the satisfaction of their needs. Raman (2010) stated that being in romantic relationship involves physical contact which causes chemical arousal to the persons involved and at the same time gain love and confidence in which they are longing for. Koob & Bloom
(1982) also explained this by stating that the individuals who are in love release a number of chemicals within the brain such as oxytocin, vasopressin and endorphins which cause “short-term” joy and pleasure.

On the other hand, According to Arnet (as cited in Fincham& Cui, 2011) "late adolescents" is the stage where teenagers experienced how to be totally and socially independent. This is the time for curiosity & explorations in choosing and having a partner, and explores this kind of curiosity that somehow leads to romantic relationship.
However, this kind of relationship may not lead to a pleasant and intense love affair.
This is just a result of their inquisitive mind and a sort of finding on how to fit into the world. “What is life all about?” Questions such as these assume special significance during teenage years, as adolescents seek to find their place in broader and social world. This quest takes adolescents along several routes.
Consequently, “half of all teens have been in a dating relationship and nearly one third of all teens have been in a serious relationship” (Teenage Research Unlimited, as cited in Luqman, 2009). According to Furman (2002), romantic relationships become more and more significant to adolescents in their social world as they also develop from puberty towards late adolescence. This shows how prevalent is romantic relationship among adolescents.
Luqman (2009) said that an adolescent relationship plays an important role to adolescents as it develops the ability for committed relationships. Additionally, Pelt
(2004) stated that those relationships help develop personality. She also added that it is a way of knowing one’s unique qualities of opposite sex and at the same time choosing the right life partner. Moreover, researchers theorized that romantic relationship is essential to the development of adolescents in different aspects such as “transformation of family relationships, close relationships with peers, sexuality, and career planning”
(Furman, 2002).

An article of Barber & Eccles (as cited in Luqman, 2009) talked about the importance of romantic relationships to adolescent development and its “long lasting” effects on self-confidence. It affirmed that romantic relationship teaches moral values on romance, “intimate relationships and sexuality”. In addition to this, healthy romantic relationship could possibly benefit student’s education (Phelps, 2007). Romantic relationship provides positive outlook of adolescents’ life which motivates the adolescents in achieving goals such as performing well in the studies. According to
Zulueta & Maglaya (2004), “motivation constitutes the degree of an individual’s behavior as manifested by his interests, attitudes, and aspirations to satisfy his desired goal. It is an urge to satisfy goal object” (p. 212). Provided a positive romantic relationship, adolescents would strive hard on performing well in studies to bring a brighter future in their relationship.
According to Lucas & Curpuz (2007), “quality personal relationships that provide stability, trust, and caring such as romantic relationships can increase learners’ sense of belonging, self-respect and self-acceptance, and provide a positive climate for learning”
(p. 16) and thus increase academic performance. According to the theory of incentive approach of motivation, the desirable properties of external stimuli – whether grades, money, affection, food, or sex – account for person’s motivation.
Moreover, theorists suggested that romantic relationship has a great role in the academic performance of adolescents. Vgotsky’s theory states that social interaction plays a very important role in the cognitive development of an individual and could not be understood without looking into the social and cultural context. Furthermore,
Vygotsky’s ideas about “cognitive development” have become major influences in

psychology and education today (Lucas & Corpuz, 2007). Theorists suggested that romantic relationship has a great role in the academic performance of adolescents.
Parents, peers, and partners, on the other hand, cooperate, collaborate and enrich the learning experience (Lucas &Corpuz, 2007). In this way, adolescents who are more knowledgeable can help in the cognitive development of their partner.
However, romantic relationships do not always behave in a positive way. There are instances in which romantic relationship may harm adolescents and because of this, they need adults who will guide them in developing healthy relationships (Luqman,
2009). In the same vein, Connolly & Johnson (cited in Weichold& Barber, 2008) said that even though romantic relationship plays an important role in the development of an adolescent, most romantic relationship in the adolescence stage last for only 6 months to 1 year. This situation implies frequent break-ups which cause anxiety among adolescents. Monroe et. al (as cited in Furman, 2002) affirmed that breakups are mostly the cause of depression among adolescents. Furman (2002) also states that adolescents are mostly prone to problems in adjustment when they got involved in romantic relationships at an early stage of their adolescent life. According to Erikson (as cited in Feldman, 2009) people proceed through eight stages of psychosocial development across their lives. He suggested that each stage requires the resolution of a crises or conflict and may produce both positive and negative outcomes. During the identity-versus-role confusion period an adolescent feels pressure to identify what to do with his life. These pressures come at a time of major physical changes and adolescent find a period an especially difficult one, thus peer group and close relationship becomes increasingly important in clarifying their personal identities. Erikson added that identity-

versus-role confusion stage marks a pivotal point in psychosocial development, paving the way for continued growth and the future development of personal relationship.
In another way, romantic relationship gives more negative effects on the academic performance of adolescents. Teens nowadays consider romantic relationship as the number one source of stress (Manning et al., 2009). It results from the break-ups or conflicts with partner. Even those who give more importance on academics, spending time with one’s partner may also serve as a distraction. Myers (2010) also said that:
For university students, relationships consume much of life. How much of your waking life is spent talking with people? One sampling of 10,000 tape recordings of half- minute slices of students’ waking hours (using belt-worn recorders) found them talking to someone 28% of the time – and that doesn’t count the time they spent to someone (Mehl&Pennebaker, 2003). In 2008, the average American 1317 year-old sent or received 1742 text messages per month (pp. 393-394).
The time spent with the partner would consume much time that must be allotted for studying; taking into consideration the time management of a student being involved in romantic relationship affects the academic performance. As stated by Crissey (2006) in her study about impact of romantic relationship on high school girls, there is really a challenge in "balancing romantic relationship and academic performance" in a teenager's life. It gives pressure on how to maintain the romantic side and the academic works as well. She also pointed out that there is more than the pressure someone will going to feel if there is a competition inside the classroom for the academic awards at the end of the school year.
Crissey (2006) then added that having a romantic affair especially when you are just a student would not just give a "source of stress" but also a disturbance. Having a romantic relationship is really disturbing because a student will deal on managing time

between the school and in the romantic side that somehow leads to give academic works a lesser priority.
Stress is a continuous feeling of worry about work or personal life that prevents someone from relaxing. Campbell, as cited by Crissey (2006), pointed out that stress is a condition or effect that is bad and can cause some problems. For example, students who are having any romantic affair will have a higher percentage of stress than those who don't have because instead of focusing to their academic work and academic stresses, they also commit their time to their relationship.
Morris &Maisto (1995) added that anxiety which can be taken from “internal and external forces” brings about stress. They also described how someone or something frustrates individuals when it stands between them and their goals. This would cause a dilemma on “irreconcilable demands, opportunity, needs or goals”. They added that
“delays, lack of resources, losses, failure and discrimination” are the primary cause of aggravation. On the other situation, negative effects of romantic relationships are very evident in the report of Namaganda (2009) saying that “developing feelings of love, two weeks before exams can lead to lack of concentration during the time a learner should be revising and thus failure” (para. 6). Thus, GastoneByamugisha (as cited in Namaganda,
2010) a psychologist and lecturer at Kyambogo University said that heart-break is not the only cause of student’s failure in exams.
Moreover, Furman, Brown &Feiring (1999) stated in their book entitled “The
Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence” that romantic relationship at an early age is the cause of higher rates of drug use, minor delinquency, and

psychological or behavioral difficulties, as well as lower levels of academic achievement that those who are not currently involved in a relationship or who delay romantic activity until later in adolescence.
In conclusion, relationships and academics can’t be joined together. On one side, the student is spending time with his/her lifelong partner, but on the other side, the student is busy trying to fulfill other responsibilities in school like making projects, studying, and maintaining grades.
On the other hand, studies about romantic relationship and its effects to academic performance revealed different results.
The study of Luqman (2009) on romantic relationship and its effects on academic performance, identity and self-esteem of 101 students attending B. Z. University and
100 students studying 10th grade Educator High School at Department of Pschology
Bahauddin Zakriya University Multan reveals that there is not relationship between the grade point average and dating status of adolescents. The variables considered were dating status, level of involvement, grade point average, identity status and self-esteem.
However, in his methodology, he only considered the students’ grade in the latest exam.
This would make his data less accurate because initial level academic performance of the respondents was not recorded. The purpose of having an initial level of academic performance is to have a comparison of before and after situations which will predict whether the academic performance of the respondent has increased or decreased during the course of romantic relationship. He then suggested that initial levels of academic achievement of students should be considered in the future research about

romantic relationship and its effects to academic performance to get more accurate results. Pham (n.d) studied about the relationships between dating and college performance of Loyola University students who were aged between 18-24 years old. It was hypothesized that dating and involvement will result in a lower grade point average.
The variables were age, gender, class standings, dating status and levels together with the academic performance of the respondents. The data did not allow the rejection of the null hypothesis. It implies that dating and involvement in romantic relationship shows no significant relationship on academic performance of college students. Thus, Pham’s study revealed the same result with Luqman’s (2009) study.
Moreover, an investigation on the effect of early parenthood among Bohol Island
State University (BISU) – Candijay Campus female students was conducted by Balaba,
Betos, Galvadores, Felisco&Atupan(2008). There were 25 unmarried mothers which were the respondents of the study. Average grades of the respondents before and after having a child were compared and the researchers discovered that academic performance was not significantly affected by the occurrence of early motherhood.
Nevertheless, results of the study showed that the respondents found it hard to concentrate on their studies because of the problems they met being early parents. This study relates to the present study because it involves time management, motivation and anxiety. Early parents were motivated to study to provide a brighter future for their child.
On the contrary, it is not easy for them to focus on their studies because of the problems they met as early parents and they find it hard to divide their time between studies and family.

Similarly, Toreon (2011) in his study on the Effect of Romantic Relationship on
Teacher Education Students’ Academic Performance at Bohol Island State University.
The study used a descriptive survey method employing convenience sampling for each year level. The variables of the study were students’ grade, intensity, level of involvement in a romantic relationship and, self-esteem. Findings describe significant effect of romantic relationship on academic performance. Intensity and level of involvement also exhibited a significant relationship on the students’ academic performance. It was also found out that a student who is involved in romantic relationship for more than two years have better score as those involved for 3 to 6 months. It was further found that the basic characteristic of the individuals who are most successful at love is high self –esteem. It has been determined that those high in self-esteem experience romantic love more as been found in the number of years of being attached to each partner.
On

the

other hand, relationship between

dating

status and

academic

achievement on grades 8, 9 and 10 in Santa Clara University in California were studied by Quatman, Sampson, Robinson and Watson (2001). The result of the study showed that higher frequency in dating would imply a lower academic performance because most of the romantic experiences showed higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower levels in academic motivation. However, this study focuses on younger population. The results may not be the case in the more mature age group.
In another study, a dissertation of Crissey (2006) focused on the differences of gender on the high school academic outcomes which were influenced by romantic relationships. The study found out that when students divided their attention to

education and romance, there was a negative outcome on the academic performance especially when they take too much concern on their romantic relationships. This situation occurs mostly on girls because of the “school romantic climate where romance is more valued. On the other hand, the study showed that boys’ “academic well-being” is being slightly affected. The increased risk of sexual activity mainly affects this situation (Crissey, 2006). However, data from the National Longitudinal Study of
Adolescent Health (as cited in Allen, 2010) revealed a different result in which males’ academic performance is negatively affected by the romantic climate.
A dissertation of Stefan (2006) which is a qualitative study on the impact of romantic relationship on the academic performance of high school girls applies merely on the western culture. Results of the study showed that there is really a “social pressure” for teenage girls who are involved in dating. She also found out this societal pressure means that girls are engaged in this kind of dating situation merely “because of some influences peers, magazines, televisions”, etc. Sometimes, if a girl doesn’t engage herself in dating, some may considered her as "weird", maybe because in the western society today, there's no more thing such as Maria Clara's, which refers to those who are a little bit conscious in dating as well as engaging in romantic relationships. She said that majority of the people would expect girls to already have a dating partner especially when girls reach into their adolescent stage. She also added that this dating is usually considered as a threshold or the first step towards romantic relationships. After conducting her study, she concluded that dating/romantic relationships have "negative and positive" outcomes into the academic performance of someone involved – positive in the sense that dating gives inspiration/motivation for

girls to do well in their academic works, if and only if girls will know how to manage time wisely and properly and that girls will not take dating seriously. However, it is negative on the other hand because it will just cause "distraction".
The findings of the study made by Phelps (2007) noted that the influence of partners, parents and peers of African American Youth to their school achievement. He considered dividing the samples by race and he found some difference that each variable influence to the romantic relationship for the Anglo and African American subsamples. He concluded that effects of academic achievement vary on race. Part of the result of his study is that peers also affect to the academic performance of the respondents. For the African American, it is their peers’ academic orientation that affects the academic performance while for Anglo Americans, both peers’ academic orientation and behaviors towards romantic relationship affects their academic performance. The result of the study of Phelps (2007) implies that factors assumed to affect academic performance of students such as personal relationships vary in each race.
Moreover, Furman (2002) stated that there has still been a great interest of romantic relationships because this interest sparks from the observation that these relationships are significant to adolescents’ lives. A lot of research has been made about this topic but most of these studies center on Euro-American youths or mostly
Western societies. Western culture has differences to Asian culture especially on the social aspects. Example would be perceptions on dating.

Western culture has differences to Asian culture especially on the social aspects.
Example would be perceptions on dating. To the researchers’ knowledge, we haven’t found some studies focusing on the Asian’s romantic relationships.
In connection with this, our study will focus on the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of Filipino students particularly, in the University of the
Philippines. Since we have known that teachers in UP Cebu have higher expectations of their students, increased workloads, challenging exercises, projects and assignments are given to the students. This notion is also supported by Manning, Giordano,
Longmore, &Hocevar (cited in Cui &Fincham, 2011) which state that college is the time when studies are more stressful than before. It is also characterized by a shift of sleeping and eating habits, more school-related works and new responsibilities (Umar,
Shaib, Aituisi, Yakubu, &Bada, 2010). Additionally, Chickering (as cited in Pham, n.d) states that serious development stage for young adults is signified by college life.
Considering the romantic relationships involved and the amount of pressure given to the students by their teachers, we assume that there will be an effect of romantic relationship on the academic performance of the students.

CHAPTER III
STUDY FRAMEWORK
Theoretical Framework:
To have a guide towards explaining the effects of romantic relationships on the academic performance of UP Cebu BSCS 2 students, the researchers will use two important theories which will also introduce the main variables of this study.
The first theory to be considered is the “Need to Belong” theory (Baumiester &
Leary, 1995) which asserts that all humans share a common need to be connected with others, and common sense signals that individuals’ lives are better for being connected.
Furthermore, Baumiester & Leary (1995) proposed that the “need to belong” has two aspects: (1) people want a stable and enduring context of concern and caring, (2) people need frequent interaction with the same person.
As stipulated in the first aspect, people want a constant perspective of being loved and cared. Myers (2010) supported this theory by stating that people who find supportive person whom they can disclose makes them feel accepted and prized. He added that this situation is associated with the arousal of behavior (i.e., irrepressible joy and happiness) to the persons involved which causes them to be driven by their goals in life. However, Myer (2010) stated that there are certain external situations (factors) which occur in the course of relationship and these situations thwarted the need to belong. Consequently, Baumeister and Leary (as cited in Gere & MacDonald, 2010)

affirmed that these threats would lead to them to focus their attention on their
“relationships and social connections”, which, by consuming limited cognitive resources, may lead to impairments in processing in other domains.
Results of the study of DeWall, Baumeister, & Vohs (as cited in Gere &
MacDonald, 2010) supported Baumeister and Leary’s proposition by showing negative impact of the threat to belongingness on the performance of different cognitive tasks.
In the meantime, as what Baumiester & Leary (1995) proposed in the second feature of the need to belong, a person has to frequently interact or get in touch with with the same person or group in order to accomplish the state of full belongingness.
This aspect gives rise to the second theory which will be used in this study. “Social
Exchange” theory according to Wang (2004), explains how interactions are maintained by exchanging benefits to each person involved in the relationship. Moreover, Wang
(2004) introduced the concept of “cost and reward” which are the basis of this theory.
She stated that rewards are the things which are received and give benefit to the receiver. Meanwhile, costs are the things which are lost at the course of giving sources.
Cost is associated with the giver of sources.
Figure 1 shows how the “Need to Belong” theory and Social Exchange theory.
The “Need to Belong” theory explains that people need to connect to others in order to satisfy their need to belong. It also proposes two aspects in achieving the need to belong. The satiation of the first aspect (which is the desire to have an enduring and stable relationship and have a context of concern and caring) in achieving the need to belong affects the cognitive tasks of the person affiliated according to their reactions.

Meanwhile, the second aspect of achieving the need to belong is frequent interaction with the same individuals or group of persons. The “Social Exchange” theory explains the behavior of how these interactions with other people will be satisfied or maintained.
It suggests that individuals who frequently interact with others will also exchange more benefits and costs. Material or non-material things that each one gives will become costs on the part of the giver while these will become benefits on the part of the receiver. This entails that if the things which they usually give in the course of their interaction, were also the things that they require in accomplishing the complex cognitive tasks, frequent interactions will affect those tasks.

Relationships (Connecting with others)

(The Need to Belong Theory)
Frequent Interaction which implies exchange of sources (Social
Exchange Theory)

Desire to have a stable relationship and have a context of concern and caring affects

Affects

Complex cognitive tasks Fig. 1 - Theoretical Framework

Conceptual Framework:
Figure 2 on the next page shows the outline of how the theories are being laid down into concepts which will be used in the study. It can be seen in the structure that aspects of romantic relationship affects the academic performance both in negative and positive way.
“Romantic relationships” is placed in the framework to specify the kind of relationship which will be studied. Applying the concept proposed by the theory of the
Need to Belong, romantic relationship allows people satisfy the need to belong.
Romantic relationship offers people more desire to have a constant feeling of being loved and cared and is characterized by more frequent interaction because of its exclusivity. Having a perspective of enduring and harmonious relationship, people have the desire to achieve their goals, thus giving their best in every task they do which contributes to the betterment of a relationship. However, this perspective is threatened by some factors such as jealousy, conflicts with partner, disapproval of other important persons, etc. The need to belong theory explains that these threatening situations affect the cognitive tasks of an individual other than the domains of romantic relationship. The levels of motivation and anxiety measure the reactions of each individual. In line with the need to belong theory, these reactions affect the performance of each individual.
On the other hand, Social Exchange Theory explains the aspect of frequent interaction which is characterized by the exchange of sources to individuals involved in a relationship (which in this study’s case is romantic relationship). Wang (2004) states

that sources which are exchanged in the course of romantic relationship, do not only include material sources, such as money and gifts. It also considers the time because in every relationship, each interaction consumes time. In the case of romantic relationship, it may be texting or calling the person over the phone, dating, talking with the person, etc. The more time a person spends in a romantic relationship, the lesser the time will remain for the other tasks. Because of these situations, performances on other complex tasks which also require time are affected.

Romantic Relationships

Time

Levels of
Motivation

Levels of
Anxiety

Affects
Positively
Affects

Negatively affects

Performance on Complex
Cognitive task
Fig. 2 Conceptual Framework

Operational Framework:
Figure 3 on the next page shows the operational structure of the study. It describes how the researchers examine the variables in finding the answer to the problem. It can be observed in the framework that romantic relationships have effects on the academic performance of the BS Computer Science 2 students of UP Cebu
College.
Romantic relationships, as described in the conceptual framework affect the complex cognitive tasks in either positive or negative way. Thus, academic performance of the students (engaged in romantic relationship) which involves complex cognitive tasks is affected by romantic relationship. The positive and negative reactions of the students regarding romantic relationships are determined by the levels of anxiety and motivation as a student.
Moreover, it is readily observed that teachers in University of the Philippines
Cebu College have higher expectations of their students. Thus, it is expected that the students have increased workload because of challenging projects, assignments, exercises and exams. When there is an increased workload, students need to spend a great amount of time in doing all of these requirements. Thus, students have to manage their time between study and relationship.
It is hypothesized that romantic relationships will affect their academic performance negatively if there is a high level of anxiety and the time management is prioritized to their romantic relationship.

Romantic Relationships of BSCS 2
Student of UPCC

Time
Management

Levels of
Motivation
as a student Academic Performance of UPCC BSCS 2 students

Levels of
Anxiety
as a student Chapter IV
Methodology
Research Design
The researchers implemented the simple descriptive design. This design used survey questionnaires which were distributed to the respondents in order to attain the main objective of the study which is to examine the effects of romantic relationships on students’ academic performance. The survey or the research itself tried to describe, analyze and interpret the status of the respondents.
The design is a non-experimental correlation research. This design investigated the relationship of the variables without manipulating them. The two main variables evaluated were academic performance and romantic relationship which involves time management, levels of motivation and anxiety.

Respondents and Locale of the Study
The research was conducted at the University of the Philippines Cebu College during the first semester, academic year 2011-2012 at Lahug, Cebu City.
There were 10 respondents who took part in the study. The population consisted of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 2 students from University of the
Philippines who participated in strictly voluntary basis.

Sampling Procedure
The researchers made use of the selective sampling method in the selection of the respondents since the study was focused on a particular group (students involved in romantic relationship). Second year BSCS students who were involved in a relationship in the A.Y. 2010-2011 became the respondents of the study. Since there are only 10 students who met this criteria, these 10 students were the respondents of the study.

Data Collection
The gathering of data for this study utilized a self-administered descriptive questionnaire because it economizes our time and effort and it has the ability to maintain respondent’s confidentiality.
The respondents will be given survey questionnaires to provide the necessary data needed in the study. After gathering the data, the researchers will group the responses according to the sub-problems of the study. An interview to one of the respondents will also be conducted to give explanation or support to their responses.

Instrumentation
In order to answer specific sub-problems in our study, survey questionnaires will be distributed to the respondents. Interview to one of our respondents will also be conducted to confirm the results of the survey.

The survey questionnaires will consist of a broad range of questions aimed at gauging the students’ involvement in romantic relationship and its adverse effects on their academic achievement. Each questionnaire will have 3 parts. The first part of the questionnaire will regard the profile of the respondent (i.e., name, gender, gwa). The second part will comprise the status of time management of the respondent. The third and fourth part will consider the levels of motivation and anxiety of the respondent as a student. These two last parts are in Likert scale form in which respondents will be tasked to indicate whether they strongly agree, agree, undecided, disagree or strongly disagree in the given statements.

Statistical Treatment of Data
Data that will be collected will be converted to percentage and will be presented in tabular and graphical forms for simple interpretation.
1. To determine the profile of the respondents in terms of gender and grade point average, percentage will be used:
Formula:

Where:
P= Percentage
F= Frequency
N= No. of respondents

2. To determine the status of time management, level of anxiety and level of motivation, the weighted mean will be used,



Formula:

̅

̅

Where:
= mean

∑f(x)

=

Total scores of students

N

=

No. of respondents

3 To find the significant correlation between the academic performance and time management; levels of motivation and academic performance; and levels of anxiety and academic performance the Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of
Correlation (r) and T-test will be used.
Formulas:
(Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation)






(∑

]

∑ ∑




Where: r = the Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation

n

= sample size

∑x

= summation of x

∑y

= summation of y

∑x2

= sum of squares of x

∑y2

= sum of squares of y

(T-test)

Where: t = computed table value r = the Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation
N = number of respondents

CHAPTER V
PRESENTATION, INTERPRETATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA
This chapter presents the data gathered by the researchers which comprised the profile of students in terms of gender, GWA in the academic year 2010-2011, status of time management in studying and with the partner, and levels of motivation and anxiety of the respondents as a student.
In order to answer the main problem of the study which is to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of BSCS 2 students (A.Y.
2010-2011), the data gathered were then tallied and presented in tabulated and textual form, analyzed using the statistical formula described in the previous chapter and interpreted according to the sub-problems of the study.
1. Respondent’s Profile
The profile of the respondents was determined by their gender and the general weighted average in the Academic Year 2010-2011 first (1st) and second (2nd) semester which were indicated in the first part of the questionnaire.
Most of the respondents were female because majority of the BS Computer
Science 2 students who were involved in romantic relationship were female.
Additionally, majority of the BS Computer Science 2 students were also female.
Figure 4.1 shows the distribution of respondents according to gender. There are four (40%) male respondents and six (60%) female respondents.

Fig. 4.1 - Distribution of Respondents according to Gender

40%
Males
60%

Females

The respondents’ general weighted average in the Academic Year 2010-2011 were also asked to measure their academic performance.
Considering their difference in mental capabilities of the respondents, the academic performance was measured according to the amount of points that has changed in their general weighted average from the first to the second semester. The negative score in academic performance means that the respondents’ general weighted average (GWA) from first semester decreased during the second semester while the positive score represents the increase of general weighted average of the respondents.
Table 1 shows the general weighted average of the respondents in the first and second semester of Academic Year 2010-2011. The scores in academic performance were also indicated.

Table 1 – Respondents’ Profile in terms of GWA in the A.Y 2010-2011
Student

General Weighted

General Weighted

Average (GWA)

Average (GWA) in

st

Scores in
Academic
Performance

in 1 Semester
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J

2nd Semester

2.9

2.7

0.20

3

3

0.00

2.7

2.7

0.00

1.6

1.9

-0.30

1.7

2

-0.30

1.8

2.7

-0.94

2.2

2.5

-0.30

2.5

2.5

0.00

1.9

2.5

-0.60

3.3

2.5

0.81

There are five (50%) respondents whose general weighted average decreased from first to second semester; two (20%) have increased and three (30%) general weighted average were maintained as it is from first to second semester. It entails that most of the respondents have decreasing grades on the second semester basing from the first semester. It then follows that majority of the respondents have lowered academic performance.
The next part of this chapter presents the analysis and interpretation of the tabulated data gathered which are the respondents’ answers on the survey questionnaire. Statistical formula such as the weighted mean and Pearson product moment correlation and t-test of Pearson’s significance were used to get their overall

response of the respondents to the survey questions and test the significant correlation between the variables.
2. Status of Time Management
According to Crissey (2006), teenagers who engage in romantic relationship were often challenged in balancing the relationship and academics. She added that this challenge gives a pressure on how to maintain the romantic side and academic works at the same time.
On the other hand, Myers (2010) stated that for college students, romantic relationships consume a lot of time. This implies that the time that they must allot in studying is consumed by spending their time with their partner.
Table 2 shows the status of time management of the respondents in studying and with the partner by using weighted mean. The midpoints in each frequency were used to determine the weight of the corresponding frequency. The respondents’ answers were classified as Always for 1-4hrs/week, Almost Always for 5-10hrs/week, and Sometimes for above 10hrs/week.
Table 2. Status of Time Management using the weighted mean
Time spent :

A

AA

S

Total

f

W = 10

%

F

W = 7.5

F

W=2

f

WM

Description

In Studying

0

0

0

2

15

8

16

10

3

S

With partner

3

30

30

3

22.5

4

8

10

6

AA

Legend:
Sometimes
(1-4 hrs./week)
Almost Always (5-10 hrs/week)
Always
(10 hrs. above / week)

S
AA
A

Table 2 reveals that there is no (0%) respondent who always spent his/her time in studying while eight (80%) students responded that they sometimes spent their time in studying, and two (20%) respondents almost always spent time in studying. The frequency of time they spent in studying acquired a weighted mean of 3 (Sometimes) which implies that majority of the respondents spent only 1-4 hrs/week to study.
Meanwhile, three (30%) respondents answered that they “always” spend their time with their partner (above 10 hrs./week), three (30%) responded “almost always” (510 hrs./week), and four (40%) responded sometimes(1-4 hrs/week).
The weighted mean ( 3 - which means Sometimes) of the time spent in studying is lesser compared to the weighted mean (6 - which means Almost Always) of the time spent with their partner. It implies that the respondents more time with their partner than in studying.
The results support Crissey’s argument saying that the respondents’ status of time management is not balanced because they spent more time with their partner than in studying. It implies that the students were more focused in their romantic relationship than their academic works. It also supports the researchers’ proposition in the study framework that the more time a person spends in a relationship, the lesser the time will remain for other tasks.Furthermore, according to Wang(2004) in her Social Exchange theory, people who are involved in a romantic relationship frequently interact with each other in order to maintain the relationship and have a feeling of being loved and cared.
This situation however, affects other tasks of persons involved since they give rewards to one another (which is the time with each other) and these rewards that they give

would also become a cost which means that they have lost their time which must be allotted for some important things such as academic works.
3. Levels of Motivation as a student
Davis (1999) said that there are students who seem to be passionate about learning but others also need inspiration in order to be stimulated. She suggested that students should be given their needs such as the need to be involved or in other words, the need to belong. “Motivation is the force that drives a person to do something”
(Sweetland, n.d.). According the Need to Belong theory, a person is motivated do tasks when he/she satisfies his need to belong in a relationship. Having a partner makes an individual feel the affection, care, and the like, that makes them motivated.
In addition, the review of related studies described that there is somehow a sense of motivation to students who involved in romantic relationship which made them perform better in their academics. Additionally, Crissey (2006) said that one beneficial effect of romantic relationship to the academic performance is that it gives an inspiration to the students involved. Furthermore, motivation allows students to give their best on the task provided.
Table 3 shows the perception of the respondents on their levels of motivation as a student while they are involved in a romantic relationship. The weighted mean in each item were computed to find the general perception of the respondents on their levels of motivation as a student.

Table 3. Perception of the respondents on their levels of motivation as a student

SA
Item
1 I feel motivated to study when my partner shows affection to me.
2 I want get good grades to ensure a brighter future with my partner.
3 I expect my partner to help me with my studies.
I feel motivated to do my projects because my partner encouraged me to do so.
5 I feel motivated to study when I’m with my partner.

f

Choices
U

A

W

f

W

f

D

W

F

Overall Perception on the item

SD

W

f

W

WM

Description

2

10

5

20

1

3

1

2

1

1

3.6 A

1

5

6

24

2

6

0

0

1

1

3.6 A

0

0

5

20

2

6

2

4

1

1

3.1 U

1

5

4

16

4 12

1

2

0

0

3.5 A

0

0

5

20

2

6

2

4

1

1

3.1 U

4

20

1

4

1

3

2

4

2

2

3.3 U

2

10

6

24

1

3

1

2

0

0

3.9 A

1

5

3

12

3

9

3

6

0

0

3.2 U

1

5

2

8

4 12

3

6

0

0

3.1 U

4 12
2
24 72 17

4
34

1
7

1
7

2.9 U
3.3 U

4

I’m inspired to finish my course when I have a romantic partner.
7 I get more comfortable when I discuss my problems and concerns in my studies to my partner.
8 I enjoy studying when I’m in a relationship.
6

9 I think I can get higher grades when I’m in a romantic relationship. 10 I feel motivated to study because my parents allow me to involve in a romantic relationship.
Overall Perception on the levels of motivation
Legend:
SA – Strongly Agree U – Undecided
A – Agree
D – Disagree

0
12

0
3
12
60 40 160

SD – Strongly Disagree
W – Weight

WM – Weighted Mean

f - frequency

Page | 40

The results reveal that the respondents’ level of motivation as a student is neutral which is evident in a weighted mean of (3.3). It means that their involvement in romantic relationship has a neutral effect on the respondents’ motivation as students. This means that even though there is some sort of motivation for the students when they involve in romantic relationship, it has only a minimal impact on the part of playing their role as students. The statement “I get more comfortable when I discuss my problems and concerns in my studies to my partner” got the highest weighted mean 3.9 (Agree). Two
(20%) respondents strongly agreed in the statement; five (50%) respondents agreed; one (10%) respondent is undecided, another one (10%) respondent disagreed; and still one (10%) respondent strongly disagreed. It entails that majority of the respondents agreed that they feel more comfortable when they discuss their problems and concerns in their studies to their partner which is in line with the perspective of Lucas &Curpuz
(2007) saying that romantic relationships offers a positive environment for learning because it offers stability, trust and care to the students involved.
Students tend to get involved in a romantic relationship because it makes them feel more acknowledgeable and motivated to be with a person who can complement their needs to whom they can share their problems. Moreover, finding a person whom they can lean on would also lessen the burdens that they carry on their lives. This is why they feel more motivated when they have romantic partners.
In the meantime, other factors of romantic relationship described by the statements in the questionnaire don’t really affect their motivation as students.

41 | P a g e

On the other hand, the statement “I feel motivated to study because my parents allow me to involve in a romantic relationship” acquired the lowest weighted mean 2.9
(Undecided). It implies that parents’ permission on the students’ involvement in romantic relationship doesn’t generally affect their motivation to study.
4. Levels of Anxiety
According to Morris & Maisto (1995), anxiety which can be taken from “internal and external forces” brings about stress. They added that “delays, lack of resources, losses, failure and discrimination” are the primary cause of aggravation. Additionally,
Crissey (2006) said that having a romantic affair especially when you are just a student would not just give a "source of stress" but also a disturbance.
Table 4 shows the levels of anxiety of the respondents as students in relation to their involvement in romantic relationship. The weighted mean in each item were computed to find the general perception of the respondents on their levels of anxiety as students. Though there are some respondents who agreed that they often feel anxious when faced with problems in their romantic relationship, results from table 4 shows that majority of the respondents’ perceptions on each item disagreed to the statements which measure their levels of anxiety as a student.

42 | P a g e

Table 4. Perception of the respondents on their levels of anxiety as a student

Choices
Item
1 I can’t concentrate on my studies whenever my partner and I have misunderstandings.
2 I can’t fix my attention on my studies because I feel worried that this romantic relationship won’t work out.
3 I often miss my classes because of hanging out with my partner.
4 I can’t concentrate on my studies because my parents don’t like my partner.
5 I can’t catch up with my lessons because I often hang out with my partner.
6 I hardly give attention on my studies because I feel worried about being left by my partner.
7 I can’t pass my projects and homework on time even if I’m in a relationship. 8 I can’t focus on my studies because I think that my partner doesn’t really love me.
I think I can’t get higher grades when I’m involved in a romantic relationship. 10 I feel worried about my studies because my parents might know that I’m involved in a relationship.
Overall Perception on their levels of anxiety as student
Legend:

A

U

D

SD
F W

Overall
Perception on the item
WM Description

SA
F W

F

W

F

W

F

W

3 15

2

8

2

6

2

4

1

1

3.4 U

3 15

1

4

1

3

3

6

2

2

3.0 U

1

5

1

4

0

0

3

6

5

5

2.0 D

0

0

2

8

1

3

4

8

3

3

2.2 D

0

0

1

4

0

0

3

6

6

6

1.6 SD

0

0

0

0

2

6

4

8

4

4

1.8 SD

0

0

0

0

1

3

4

8

5

5

1.6 SD

1

5

0

0

1

3

2

4

6

6

1.8 SD

0

0

2

8

2

6

3

6

3

3

2.3 D

2 10
2
8
1
3
0
0
5
5
10 50 11 44 11 33 28 56 40 40

2.6 D
2.2 D

9

SA – Strongly Agree U – Undecided
A – Agree
D – Disagree

SD – Strongly Disagree
W – Weight

WM – Weighted Mean

f - frequency

Page |1

The general perception of the respondents regarding their levels of anxiety acquired a weighted mean of 2.2 (Disagree). It implies that majority of the respondents have a lower level of anxiety as a student while they were involved in a romantic relationship. Majority of the respondents perceived that their level of anxiety is low because they were more aware of the benefits that their romantic partners have given them. Moreover, they feel that they are more comfortable when they involve in a relationship. Most of them think that they can still do well in their studies when involved in a relationship.In addition, most of the adolescents who were involved in a romantic relationship did not consider their romantic partners to be a distraction in their studies.
The statement “I can’t concentrate on my studies whenever my partner and I have misunderstandings” got the highest weighted mean, 3.4 (Undecided). Three (30%) respondents strongly agreed on this statement; two (20%) agreed, 2 (20%) remain undecided, 2 (20%) disagreed, and one (10%) respondent strongly disagreed. It implies that the general perception of the respondents on their level of anxietyis categorically neutral when it comes to the statement which describes those conflicts between them and their partner, affect their studies. Furthermore, this indicates that the respondents in general were divided on their side whether misunderstanding with their partner can cause distraction in their studies, some students agreed and some did not.Some students agreed that they can’t concentrate on their studies whenever they have misunderstandings with their partner because their thoughts are focusing on how they can cope up with their misunderstandings. Crissey (2006) also added that having a romantic affair especially when you are just a student would not just give a "source of

stress" but also a disturbance. However, there are also students who disagreed on the notion the notion that misunderstanding and conflicts of romantic partners can distract their studies because somehow, they can manage the situation well and will not get easily affected by the problems outside academic aspects, such as misunderstandings with their partner.
In the meantime, there were two statements which acquired the lowest weighted mean (1.6 – Strongly Disagree). In the first statement: “I can’t catch up with my lessons because I often hang out with my partner”, one (10%) respondent agreed; three (30%) disagreed; six (60%) strongly disagreed and no (0%) respondent perceived to be neutral on the statement. Meaning to say, most of the respondents disagreed to the perspective that they can’t catch up with their lessons because they often hang out with their partners. In the second statement,“I can’t pass my projects and homework on time if I’m in a relationship”, there was no respondent who strongly agreed or agreed; one
(10%) respondent was undecided; four (40%) disagreed; five (50%) respondents strongly disagreed. It means that majority of the respondents can still pass their projects and homework on time even if they engage in romantic relationship.
The following portion of this chapter determines the correlation of time management, levels of motivation and anxiety to the academic performance of the respondents. In finding the correlation, the scores of each respondent on the corresponding variable were computed using the mean, together with the academic performance of the respondents which is determined by the amount of points that the grades have changed between the two semesters. The Pearson product moment of correlation was used to determine if there is a correlation between variables. Moreover,

the formula for t-test which is described in the previous chapter is used to determine the significant relationship of variables to be correlated in the following parts.
In t-test,the degrees of freedom, tabled values and the value of r are used. The degrees of freedom and tabled values will be constant in each correlation which will be
8 and 1.860. The value of the degrees of freedom is equal to the number of respondents subtracted by 2 (N - 2). In the meantime, the tabled value which is used is also according to the number of participants and the significant level 0.5 which is applicable to this study.
Furthermore, the result to the computation of t-test is the computed value for t. In assessing the significance of the relationship of two variables, the computed value for t and the tabled value 1.860 (which is constant) are compared. A greater computed value for t than the tabled value suggests that there is a significant relationship between the variables being compared. However, if the computed t value is negative which means that it is beyond the tabulated value, then, there is still a significant relationship between the variables being correlated. Meanwhile, the computed t value which is lower than the tabulated value signifies that if there is a relationship in the two variables, the relationship is not significant.
5. Correlation of Time Management and Academic Performance
As shown in the previous pages, the respondents became more focused on their romantic relationship since they spend more time with their partner than in studying.
The students who are involved in a relationship have faced a challenge in balancing their time in academics and romantic side. Consequently, it is indeed important to find

out if there is a correlation between the respondents’ time management and their academic performance.
In finding the correlation between time management and academic performance, it will be divided into two: time spent in studying vs. academic performance and the time spent with the partner vs. academic performance.
Crissey (2006) who studied the impact of romantic relationship among girls in high school believed that the time management of the students involved in romantic relationship affects their academic performance. She said that the more time spent by the students to their partner, the lesser the time they will spend in studying. Consequently, the present study investigates if there is really a significant relationship of the time management (which constitutes the time spent by the respondents in studying and in their partner) and academic performance of the students in a romantic relationship.
Table 5.1.1 illustrates the correlation of time spent in studying and academic performance. Weighted mean for the time spent in studying and the change of grades from first to second semester (which is the score in academic performance) were calculated. Table 5.1.2 represents the results of the computed values for correlation (r) and the level of significance of the correlation by using the pearson product moment of correlation and t-test respectively.

Table 5.1.1 Correlation Between Time Spent in Studying and Academic
Performance
Student

Scores in
Time Spent in
Studying

Scores in
Academic
performance

A

7.5

0.20

B

2

0.00

C

2

0.00

D

2

-0.30

E

2

-0.30

F

2

-0.94

G

2

-0.30

H

7.5

0.00

I

2

-0.60

J

2

0.81

Total

31

-1.43

Table 5.1.2 Result in T-test (Correlation Between Time Spent in Studying and
Academic Performance)
Value of r
0.27

Computed t(
0.79



)

Tabled t

Implication

1.860

Not
Significant

The value of r which is 0.27 shows that there is a slight relationship between the two variables mentioned earlier. However, using the t-test with significance level of 0.05, with degrees of freedom which is 8, the computed t value which is 0.79 is less than the tabled value (1.860) which implies that the relationship is not significant.It suggests that the amount of time they spend in studying does not necessarily affect their academic

performance. This is due to the fact that there are still other academic works that the students may have done in order to succeed in academics just like making projects and assignments. On the other hand, Crissey (2006) also proposed that the students’ time spent with their partner affects their academic performance. This is supported by social exchange theory which proposed that rewards which are given to the partner such as time would imply a cost for the giver since this source which must be needed to accomplish other important tasks such as doing school works is lost.
Tables 5.2.1and 5.2.2 illustrate the correlation between time spent with partner and the academic performance of the respondents.
Table 5.2.1 Correlation between the Time Spent with Partner and
Academic Performance
Student

Scores in Time
Spent with the partner Scores on academic performance A
B
C
D

2
7.5
10
7.5

0.20
0.00
0.00
-0.30

E

2

-0.30

F

10

-0.94

G
H
I
J

10
7.5
2
2

-0.30
0.00
-0.60
0.81

Total

60.5

-1.43

Table 5.2.2 Result in T-test (Correlation between the Time Spent with Partner and
Academic Performance)
Value of r
-0.37

Computed t(



)

-1.13

Tabled t
1.860

Implication
Significant

The t-test was used with the same significance level, and tabular value in the previous correlation procedure. A correlation value of -0.37 and a computed t value of -1.12 which is beyond the tabular value illustrates that there is a significant negative correlation between the time spent by the respondents with their partner and their academic performance. Table 5.2.1 shows that the student with the most time spent with the partner has also the least score in academic performance. Additionally, in the interviews conducted by the researchers, results reveal that the respondents were more pressured in managing their time the moment their romantic partners call or would like to communicate them since they are given the priority instead of studying, making projects, or assignments and the like. A respondent said:
"If manawag akong uyab, moingon ra ko na dili ko busy bisan naa koy gibuhat na assignment aron lang makastorya ko niya" (I always say to my romantic partner that
I’m not busy whenever he calls me, even though I’m doing some stuffs for the subjects I have taken, because I also wanted to talk to him).
Hence, the time allotted for studying or doing some other school work was consumed and thereby causes a low academic performance.
The outcome suggested that the time spent with their partner is inversely related to their academic performance. Meaning to say, the more time they spend with their partner, there is a great probability that their academic performance will decline, and the

lesser the time they spend with their partner, there is a great probability that their academic performance will increase.Students who spend more time with their partner most often leave their academic works such as doing projects, doing homework’s or studying. 6. Correlation between Levels of Motivation/Anxiety and Academic Performance
The results shown in the previous pages illustrate that the respondents’ general perception in their level of motivation as students is neutral. However, there are also respondents who agreed that they are motivated as students while they are involved in a romantic relationship. In relation to this, it is noteworthy to determine whether a significant correlation between levels of motivation of the respondents and their academic performance exists.
Table 6.1.1 shows the correlation between levels of motivation as students and academic performance of the respondents.

Table 6.1.1 Correlation between Levels of Motivation as a Student and
Academic Performance of the Respondents
Student
A
B
C

Score in
Motivation
3.8
3.2
2.7

Scores in Academic
Performance
0.20
0.00
0.00

D

4.1

-0.30

E

3.5

-0.30

F

3.2

-0.94

G

3.4

-0.30

H

2.5

0.00

I

3.6

-0.60

J

3.6

0.81

Total

33.6

-1.43

Table 6.1.2 Result in T-test (Correlation between Levels of Motivation as a Student and
Academic Performance of the Respondents)
Value of r
0.006

Computed t(
0.02



)

Tabled t
1.860

Implication
Not
Significant

Using the t-test, the computed t value is 0.02 which is less than the tabular value
(1.860) at 0.05 level of significance and 8 degrees of freedom. Tables 6.1.1 and and
6.1.2 show that there is no significant relationship between the levels of motivation of the respondents as students and their academic performance.
Meaning to say, higher level of motivation of the respondents as students when it relates to their romantic relationship does not necessarily imply that their academic performance will also get higher. The data presented in table 6.1.1 implies that the respondents’ level of motivation shows a very low coefficient of correlation (r) which is equal to 0.006. Meaning to say the change in the grades of the respondents was not dependent on their level of motivation. Respondents’ perceptions on their levels of motivation as students while in a romantic relationship do not show some pattern of relationship between levels of motivation and academic performance. One of the respondents said:
Bisan pa og maka-motivate ang paguyab-uyab, pero di man malikayanng away ug selos maong dilikaayo makaapekto ang motivation (even though romantic relationship offers motivation, misunderstandings and conflicts can’t still be

avoided that is why motivation doesn’t really give impact to academic performance). Same is true with another respondent who said:
Tinood man jud na maka- motivate ang pag uyab-uyab kay ganahan nako moskwela ug tarong pero bisan maka-motivate siya kay naa man puy time nga ma-disappoint ko labina tong dili na siya motubag kon magtext ko, unya kanunay rapud ingon na busy siya. Mao toy rason na nakigbuwagna lang ko sa akong uyab. (It is true that romantic relationship allows me to motivate myself to study well but there is still some time comes that it disappointed me because my partner doesn’t respond me on my messages and he often said that he is busy whenever I want to talk with him. That is why I broke up with him).
These statements given by the respondents indicate that motivation doesn’t have an impact to their academic performance because there are situations in a romantic relationship which would oppose the purpose of motivation. It implies that there are factors in romantic relationship which gives more impact on the academic performance of the students rather than the motivation it gives to the students.

On the other hand, according to the Multidimensional anxiety theory (Martens et. al., 1990), a person who is anxious has a lower performance, because anxiety has effects (negative) of the body’s activation. Anxiety creates a distraction to students because it gives pressure to them and the attention will be divided.

Table 6.2.1 illustrates the correlation of the respondents’ level of anxiety as students and their academic performance. Weighted mean for their level of anxiety and the change of grades from first to second semester (which is the score in academic performance) were calculated.

Table 6.2.2 represents the results of the computed values for correlation (r) and the level of significance of the correlation by using the pearson product moment of correlation and t-test respectively.
Table 6.2.1 Correlation between Levels of Anxiety as a Student and Academic
Performance
Student

Scores in Anxiety

Scores in Academic
Performance

A

4.3

0.20

B

2.6

0.00

C

1.6

0.00

D

1.9

-0.30

E

1.7

-0.30

F

1.2

-0.94

G

3.1

-0.30

H

2

0.00

I

2.1

-0.60

J

2

0.81

Total

22.5

-1.43

Table 6.2.2 Result in T-test(Correlation between Leves of Anxiety and Academic
Performance)
Value of r
-0.61

Computed t(
-2.18



)

Tabled t
1.860

Implication
Significant

It indicates that the value of correlation is -0.61 which means that there is a considerable negative linear relationship between the two variables. Furthermore, at

0.05 significant level, the critical value which is -2.18 is less than or beyond the tabled value which is 1.860. It signified that the relationship is statistically significant. Meaning to say, as their level of anxiety increases the academic performance decreases while as their anxiety level decreases, their academic performance increases. It is also true to the present study based from the data shown in table 6.2.1. Based on the interview conducted, break-up which was not mentioned in the survey questionnaire was also a factor which contributes to the anxiety of students. A respondent said:
Pag nagbuwag mi sa ahong uyab, naglisod ko ug cope up sa ahong sitwasyon kay sige rako og huna-huna niya, usahay di nalang ko ganahan magtoon. Kadto sang bag-o pa mi nagbuwag kay dili nako maka-concentrate sa ahong mga gipangbuhat. (When I broke up with my boyfriend, I found it difficult to cope up with the pain that I felt in breaking up with him. I wasn’t even motivated to study and sometimes, I couldn’t concentrate with the things that I did.)
As a result, the situations distracted her studies and affected her academic performance. Table 6.2.2 indicates that the level of anxiety of the respondents is inversely correlated with their academic performance and this correlation is statistically significant. Meaning to say, it is necessary that the academic performance increases as the anxiety level gets lower; and the higher the anxiety level is, the academic performance will decline. This coincides with the theory of multidimensional anxiety mentioned earlier which suggests that person who is anxious has a lower performance because of the negative effects of anxiety on body’s activation.

CHAPTER VI
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
The study aimed to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of UP Cebu BS Computer Science 2 students. Data needed are gathered through the distribution of the survey questionnaires to the students of the sample population who were involved in romantic relationship during the academic year
2010-2011 in order to attain the objectives.
The summary of finding is as follows:
1. The results indicate that majority of the BS Computer Science 2 students who were involved in romantic relationship have decreased their general weighted average from the first semester to the second semester of the academic year 2011-2012.
2. The results show that the respondents spent more time with their partner than in studying. This is evident in their weighted mean. The time spent in studying acquired a weighted mean of 3 (Sometimes) while the time spent with partner acquired a weighted mean of 6 (Almost Always).
3. The results reveal that the respondents’ level of motivation as a student considering the involvement in romantic relationship is neutral. This is evident in the average mean of 3.3 which is categorized as neutral.
4. The results show that the respondents’ level of anxiety is low since it acquired an average mean of 2.2(Disagree).

5. The results suggest that there is a positive correlation (r = 0.27) between the time spent in studying and the academic performance but is not statistically significant (t=
0.79 < 1.860). Meaning to say, though there is a slight relationship between the academic performance and time spent in studying, there is no enough statistical evidence found in the data which shows that academic performance is depends on the time spent in studying.
6. The results denote that there is a significant (t = -1.13, beyond 1.860) negative correlation(r = -0.37) between the time spent with the partner and the academic performance of the BS Computer Science 2 students who were involved in romantic relationship. Findings indicate that the more time spent by the respondents with their partner, decrease of academic performance also followed. Moreover, data gathered from the interview also supported the results. The respondents were more pressured in managing their time the moment their romantic partners call or would like to communicate them. They showed that their romantic partners are given the priority instead of studying, making projects, or assignments and the like, thus making the academic performance gets affected.
7. The results depict that the correlation between the respondents’ level of motivation and academic performance is very low which is equal to 0.006. Meaning to say, the change in the grades of the respondents was not dependent on their level of motivation. This can be deduced from the data wherein a respondent who has a score of 3.6 in the level of motivation has a positive score in academic performance while another respondent who is in the same level of motivation has a negative score in academic performance.

8. The results show that there is a significant inverse correlation between the level of anxiety of the respondents and their academic performance It is evident in the correlation value of -0.61 which is negative and in the computed t value of -2.18 which is beyond the tabulated value. In addition, a respondent also confirmed this by saying that there are situations associated with romantic relationships (such as break-ups, conflicts, etc.) which can cause distraction to the students’ studies because of the pain that these situations brought up.

CONCLUSIONS
The main objective of the study is to determine the effects romantic relationship to the academic performance of the UP Cebu BS Computer Science 2 students. It aimed to determine the status of time management of the BS Computer Science 2 students and also their levels of motivation and anxiety as students. It also aimed to determine if variables such as the time management, levels of motivation, and levels of anxiety which are part of a romantic relationship are significantly related to the academic performance.
Based on the results of the study, it was found out that there is significant effect of romantic relationship on the academic performance of the UP BS Computer Science
2 students.
Adolescent stage is the time when people started looking for their romantic partner. For the BS Computer Science 2 students who are involved in romantic relationship, it can be noticed that they are more focused on their romantic relationship.
They were not able to balance their time between romantic relationship and academics.
Since college life is not easy due to the increase of workloads and greater responsibilities given to the students, students who spend more time with their partner have lower academic performance. On the other hand, the researchers found out that there is a significant inverse relationship on between the levels of anxiety and academic performance, thus, the higher their level of anxiety, the lower will be their academic performance. However, it was found out that respondents’ anxiety as students is only in the low level when it comes to their general perception. Since most of the respondents’ scores in academic performance are very low, it can be deduced that the time spent with their partner has the greatest negative impact on their academic performance of
UP BS Computer Science 2 students.
In conclusion, if students are involved in a romantic relationship, a higher level of anxiety that the students would experience in a romantic relationship would indicate a great possibility that it would offer negative effects to their academic performance. Yet,
BS Computer Science 2 students who are involved in romantic relationship have reported that they have a low level of anxiety as students. It can be implied that there is no other factor that greatly affects the negative academic performance of the UP BS
Computer Science 2 students but the time they spent with their partner. Conversely, the researchers found out that the respondents’ level of motivation as students has only a slight relationship with academic performance which implies that it doesn’t necessarily affect academic performance as much as the anxiety levels of the respondents do.

RECOMMENDATIONS
The study aimed to determine the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of BS Computer Science 2 students in UP Cebu. This study covers only a small part of the population of adolescents who are involved in romantic relationship with which the researchers cannot generalize it for all the adolescents who involve in romantic relationships. Thus, for the researchers who will be going to research more about the effects of romantic relationship in the academic performance of the student, we highly recommend that they must gather respondents in a wider range since this study is just focused on the views of only 10 respondents from the
University of the Philippines BSCS II students. Moreover, limited respondents may affect the precision of the results of the study.
For the BS Computer Science 2 students, the researchers recommend that if they will involve themselves in a romantic relationship, they must balance their time management in order not to affect their academic performance. In addition, for students who are involved in a relationship and for those are planning to be involved, we recommend that they should be aware of the anxieties that romantic relationship would bring so that they could manage themselves to cope up with the problems that would meet in this relationship.
It is also recommended that parents may allow their siblings to involve in a romantic relationship since it contributes to the development of adolescents for a better committed relationship in the future. However, together with it must be the guidance that the academic performance of their siblings will not be affected.

References

A. Printed Sources
1.

Research Papers

Balaba, C., Betos, R., Galvadores, R., Felisco, C., & Atupan, E. (2008). Awareness of negative effects of premarital sex relationship among college students of Bohol
Island State University Cogtong Candijay Campus, Cogtong, Candijay, Bohol
(Unpublished undergraduate thesis). Bohol Island State University
Cogtong Candijay Campus.
Toreon,

2.

Books

Lucas, M. R., & Corpuz, B. (2007). Facilitating learning: A metacognitive process.
Philippines: Lorimar Publishing, Inc.
Morris, C. & Maisto, A. (1995). Psychology: An introduction (12th ed.). Upper Saddle
River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
Myers, D. (2010). Social psychology. London: McGraw-hill Companies.
Pelt, N. (2004). The compleat courtship. Philippines: Philippine Publishing House.
Zulueta, F. & Maglaya, E. (2004). Foundations of Education. Philippines: National Book
Store.
B. Online Sources
1.

Online Research Papers

Crissey, S. R. (2006). Gender differences in the academic consequences of adolescent heterosexual romantic relationships (Doctoral dissertation). Available from
ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. (UMI No. 1179965251)
Phelps, K. (2007). Partners, parents, and peers’ effects on African American youths’ school achievement (Doctoral dissertation). Graduate College of Bowling Green

State University. Retrieved from http://etd.ohiolink.edu/send
-pdf.cgi/Phelps%20Kenyatta%20D.pdf?bgsu1194313802
Raman, J. (2010). Correlates of tertiary student life satisfaction (Masteral thesis).
Retrieved from http://researchcommons.waikato.ac.nz/bitstream/10289/5049/3/ thesis.pdf 2.

E-books

Cui, M.,& Fincham, F. (2011). Romantic relationships and academic/career trajectories in emerging adulthood. In W. D. Manning, P. C. Giordano, M. A. Longmore, and
A. Hocevar, Romantic relationships in emerging adulthood (pp. 317-334).
Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=36qIAymTlPAC&printsec= frontcover&hl=fil#v=onepage&q&f=false Furman, W., Brown B., &Feiring C. (Eds.). (1999). The Development of Romantic
Relationships in Adolescence. Retrieved from http://www.du.edu/psychology/relationshipcenter/publications/pdfs/MissingtheLo veBoat.pdf

3.

E-Journals

Davis, B. (1999). Motivating students.In Honolulu Intranet Community College.
Retrieved from http://www2.honolulu.hawaii.edu/facdev/guidebk/teachtip/m otiv.htm Campbell, W., Oliver, M. B, & Sedikides C. (1994). Perceived benefits and costs of romantic relationships for women and men: Implications for exchange theory.
Personal Relationships l, 5-21. Retrieved from http://www.soton.ac.uk/~crsi/Perceived_benefits.pdf Furman, W. (2002). The emerging field of adolescent romantic relationships. Current
Directions in Psychological Science 11(5), 177-180. Retrieved from http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/dmessinger/c_c/rsrcs/rdgs/peers_social _general/furman.adol_romance.curddir2002.pdf
Koob, G. F., & Bloom, F. E. (1982). Behavioral effects of neuropeptides: endorphins and
Vasopressin. Annual Review Physiology, 44, 571-582. doi: 10.1146/annurev.ph.
44.030182.003035

Luqman, M. (2009). Effects of romantic relationship on self-esteem, identity and academic performance.National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse, 12.
Available online at http://www.webclearinghouse.net
Manning, W., Giordano, P., Phelps, K., & Longmore, M. (2009).Adolescent romantic relationships and academic achievement. Social Science Research 37(1), 37-54.
Retrieved from http://www.bgsu.edu/downloads/cas/file35765.pdf
Quatman, T., Sampson, K., Robinson, C. & Watson, C.M. (2001). Academic motivational, and emotional correlates of adolescent dating. Genetic, Social, and
General Psychology Monographs, 127(2), 211-234.
Umar, S., Shaib, I., Aituisi, D., Yakubu, N., & Bada, O. (2010). The effect of social factors on students' Academic performance in Nigerian tertiary institutions.
Library Philosophy and Practice, 334. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl. edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1342&context=libphilprac 4.

Abstract

Stefan, A. (2006). The impact of romantic relationships on the academic performance of high school girls: A qualitative study [Abstract]. Available from ProQuest
Dissertations and Theses database. (UMI No. 1051280811)
5.

Online Newsletter

Weichold,K.& Barber, B. (2008). Introduction to qualities of romantic relationships in adolescence and adulthood. International Society for the Study of Behavioural
Development, 1. Retrieved from http://www.issbd.org/resources/files/ISSBD1(53)1-28.pdf 6. Online Newspaper
Namaganda, A. (2010, November 1). How school romance hurt academic performance.
Daily Monitor. Retrieved August 7, 2011, from http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/
Education/-/688336/1044028/-/dxyg4b/-/
Allen, A. (2010, February 9). Does having a relationship affect academic performance?
The Knight Times Online. Retrieved August 30, 2011, from http://my.hsj.org/Schools/Newspaper/tabid/100/view/frontpage/schoolid/2632/art icleid/333995/newspaperid/2631/Does_having_a_relationship_affect_academic
_performance.aspx

Questionnaire
Dear Respondent,
Good Day! We are Alma Mae Bernales and Fretzy Colonia, second year students taking up
Communication II. We are conducting a study about the effects of romantic relationship on the academic performance of BSCS 2 students. We would like to ask a little of your time to answer this survey questionnaire. Please answer it with all honesty. We assure you that this is confidential. We are hoping for your kind cooperation.
Thank you!

Sincerely Yours,
The Proponents
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Part I. Personal Information
Name (optional): __________________________________________________
Sex:__________
Indicate your general weighted average:
A.Y. 2010-2011, First Sem:

_______

A.Y. 2010-2011, Second Sem: _______

Part II. Please check () the answers that corresponds to your choice.
How often do you spend time: in studying?

with your partner?

Always (above 10 hrs. /week) ______

Always (above 10 hrs. /week) ______

Almost Always (5-10 hrs/week)______

Almost Always (5-10 hrs/week)______

Sometimes (1-4 hrs/week)

Sometimes (1-4 hrs/week)

______

______

Part III & Part IV. General Instruction: Please check ( ) the answers that correspond to your choice based on the following statements:
SD: Strongly Disagree
D: Disagree

U: Undecided

SA: Strongly Agree
A: Agree

Part III.
Motivation scale:
I feel motivated to study when my partner shows affection to me.
I want get good grades to ensure a brighter future with my partner.
I expect my partner to help me with my studies.
I feel motivated to do my projects because my partner encouraged me to do so.
I feel oti ated to stud he I’ ith part er.
I’ i spired to fi ish ourse he I ha e a ro a ti part er.
I get more comfortable when I discuss my problems and concerns in my studies to my partner.
I e jo stud i g he I’ i a relatio ship.
I thi k I a get higher grades he I’ i a ro a ti relatio ship.
I feel motivated to study because my parents allow me to involve in a romantic relationship.

Part IV.
Anxiety scale:
I a ’t o e trate o studies he e er part er a d I ha e misunderstandings. I a ’t fi atte tio o studies e ause I feel orried that this ro a ti relatio ship o ’t ork out.
I often miss my classes because of hanging out with my partner.
I a ’t o e trate o studies e ause pare ts do ’t like part er.
I a ’t at h up ith lesso s e ause I ofte ha g out ith part er.
I hardly give attention on my studies because I feel worried about being left by my partner.
I a still pass proje ts a d ho e ork o ti e e e if I’ i a relationship. I a ’t fo us o studies e ause I thi k that part er does ’t reall love me.
I thi k I a ’t get higher grades he I’ i ol ed i a ro a ti relationship. I feel orried a out studies e ause pare ts ight k o that I’ involved in a relationship.

SA

A

U

D

SD

SA

A

U

D

SD…...

Similar Documents

Dua Lipa - Be The One | Hildegard Knef | [HorribleSubs] Black Clover - 71 [720p].mkv