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Consultant’s Guide to

Park Design

and Development

City of San Diego
Park and Recreation Department
November 2004

City of San Diego

Park & Recreation Department

January 2005

(REVISION: 5/23/05 Revised Appendix ‘M’; 6/6/05 Revised Appendix ‘N’;

2/2/06 Added Appendix ‘O’; Revised Item 2.2.17.2 page 36-37; Item J page 85, # 3, #4)

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

City of San Diego Park and Recreation Department

Director, Ted Medina

Deputy Director Community Parks I Division

Deputy Director Developed Regional Parks Division

Deputy Director Community Parks II Division

Deputy Director Open Space Division

Deputy Director Park Planning & Development Division, April Penera
City Staff
Sheila Bose, Park Planning & Development Division

Div Brasted, Developed Regional Parks Division

Tom Cartier, Public Buildings and Parks Division

Charles Daniels, Park Planning & Development Division

Hossein Motamani, Park Planning & Development

Janine Anderson, Developed Regional Parks Division

Mark Marney, Park Planning & Development Division

John Montoya, Facilities Maintenance Division

Kevin Oliver, Park Planning & Development Division

Jim Winter, Park Planning & Development Division

L. Clark Ritter, Park Planning & Development Division

Tina Huang, Park Planning & Development Division

Kelly Rodgers, Park Planning & Development Division

Todd Schmit, Park Planning & Development Division

Deborah Sharpe, Park Planning & Development Division

Robin Shifflet, Park Planning & Development Division

Alex Warner, Park Planning & Development Division

Denise Weems, Park Planning & Development Division

Consultant’s Guide Update Coordinator:
Tony Bonacorsi, Park Planning & Development Division

Special Thanks:
The Park Planning & Development Division would like to extend a special ‘Thank You’ to the numerous individuals, organizations and City staff who helped in the update of the Consultant’s
Guide.

Consultant’s Guide to

Park Design and

Development

“We enrich lives through quality parks and programs.”
City of San Diego Park and Recreation Department’s Vision Statement

Prepared by:

Park Planning & Development

Park and Recreation Department

202 “C” Street

San Diego, CA 92101-3860

January 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.

INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2

2.

Page Number

Purpose and Application
Description of Changes

1

2

PARK DESIGN STANDARDS
2.1

3

3

3

4

2.2

3.

Types of Recreational Parks
2.1.1 Resource - Based Parks
2.1.2 Population - Based Parks
2.1.3 Special Parks
Design Standards
2.2.1
Site Planning
2.2.2
Grading and Drainage
2.2.3
Paving, Walkways and Mow Curbs
2.2.4
Fences and Walls
2.2.5
Site Furniture
2.2.6
Multi-Purpose Courts
(Basketball and Volleyball Courts)

2.2.7
Tennis Courts
2.2.8
Swimming Pools
2.2.9
Multi-Purpose Fields
(Softball and Soccer Fields)

2.2.10
Playgrounds and Equipment
2.2.11
Comfort Stations and Recreation Centers
2.2.12
Parking Areas
2.2.13
Trash Enclosures
2.2.14
Signs
2.2.15
Trails
2.2.16
Irrigation
2.2.17
Planting
2.2.18
Site and Sports Lighting
2.2.19
Graffiti Prevention

4

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

14

21

26

27

27

28

29

35

38

42

GRAPHIC AND DRAFTING STANDARDS
3.1

General Development Plans (GDP)
3.1.1
General Requirements for all GDP Plans
3.1.2
General Development Plan
3.1.3
Building Plans and Elevations

42

42

42

43

Page Number
3.1.4
3.1.5
3.1.6
3.1.7

3.2

3.3
4.

43

43

43

44

Construction Plans
3.2.1
General Requirements for all Plans
3.2.2
Title Sheet
3.2.3
Grading and Drainage Plans
3.2.4
Layout and Construction Plans
3.2.5
Irrigation Plans
3.2.6
Planting Plans
3.2.7
Lighting Plans

45

46

47

51

52

53

56

57

As-Built Plans

58

PROJECT PROCESS, SUBMITTALS AND APPROVALS
4.1
4.2
4.3

5.

Park Sign Plan and Elevation(s)
Special Site Details and Site Furniture
Project Cost Estimate
Design review Committee Presentation

Requirements

General Development Plans
Construction Plans
As-Built Plans

58

61

62

APPENDICES
Appendix ‘A’ Park and Recreation Board Policies: No. 1001 ‘Naming of Parks’, No.
1011 ‘Graphic Presentations’ and No. 1302 ‘Park Signs’
Appendix ‘B’
Council Policy No. 200-14 ‘Landscape Design’
Appendix ‘C’
References Cited
Appendix ‘D’
Standard Symbols and Legend for Irrigation Systems
Appendix ‘E’
Approved Irrigation Materials List
Appendix ‘F’
Supplemental Irrigation Specifications
Appendix ‘G’
Approved Manufacturers and Products List
Appendix ‘H’
Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED)
Guidelines for Park Design
Appendix ‘I’
Division Standards and Specification from Facilities Division
Appendix ‘J’
Standard Park Details
Multi-Purpose Courts
Tennis Courts
Multi-Purpose Fields
Appendix ‘K’
Council Policy #900-14, Sustainable Building Policy
Appendix ‘L’
Disapproved Play Equipment
Appendix ‘M’
Joint Use Checklist
Appendix ‘N’
Access Law Memorandum’s 2004-01,-02,-03,-04
Appendix ‘O”
Policy on Avoiding Use of Non-Native Invasive Plants in Park &
Recreation Department Projects

PREFACE
The Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and Development is prepared by the Park Planning &
Development Division of the Park and Recreation Department. This new edition, dated January
2005, replaces the last published edition, dated November 2001. The Park and Recreation
Department will update the Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and Development on an as­ needed basis. The Appendices, found in the back of the Guide, will be updated on a yearly basis.
Copies of this document or the Appendices can be obtained by contacting the Park Planning
Section at the address list below.
This is a guideline for City staff, consultants and the general public to use in the design and development of public parks. These guidelines support the City’s General Plan and Policy
Documents but are subject to change due to changes in local, State and Federal laws, changes in
City policy or administration.
The Park and Recreation Department is dedicated to the high quality of this publication and desires to correct any errors, omissions or ambiguity. If you have any corrections, additions or suggestions that you would like to submit for consideration to be included in the next publication, please submit them in writing to:
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development

Park Planning & Development Division of the Park and Recreation Department

City of San Diego

202 ‘C’ Street, M.S. 35

San Diego, CA 92101

1.

INTRODUCTION

1.1

PURPOSE AND APPLICATION
1.1.1

Intent
The Park and Recreation Department has developed the Consultant’s Guide to establish general standards, guidelines and criteria for the design and development of parks and open spaces. The Consultant’s Guide is not a substitute for professional experience. Sound judgment must be exercised in the application of the standards to specific circumstances. The standards do not preclude the use of different methods when special conditions or site specific conditions are a factor and when proper authorization is obtained.
The Park and Recreation Department encourages “partnering”, the creation of a relationship between the City Project Manager and the Consultant that promotes achievement of the standards and quality parks. In this respect, City Project
Managers and the Consultant are encouraged to take the time at the start of a project to identify common goals, lines of communication and a commitment to cooperative problem solving.
If a major deviation from the standards is necessary or desirable the City Project
Manager should be informed by writing so that a change can be evaluated as a possible future revision to the Consultants Guide.

1.1.2

Goals
The Park and Recreation Department ensures quality parks by basing designs on the following goals:
Aesthetics: Parks should project a positive image and establish a permanent character for the community and City. Park designs should provide a sense of arrival with reference points to promote circulation. They should provide places for groups and individuals for both formal and impromptu events. They should indicate nature through seasonal changes and provide something unique, obvious, complex and simple. They should provide human and monumental scale and should be visible from a distance. Overall, a sense of place and community should be created through the design of each Park.
Function: Parks should be designed for all community members to use and enjoy the facilities. Parks must also be functionally designed for the people who maintain the facilities. The most current products and industry standards should be applied to the park’s design.
Economics: Parks should be designed for the allocated budgetary considerations and to provide economical means of maintaining the park.
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1.1.3

1.1.4

1.2

Application
The Consultant’s Guide applies to all parks, rights-of-way, MADS, gas tax medians and open spaces that are to be maintained by the Park and Recreation
Department or a City Maintenance Assessment District. This includes all new parks, retrofitting existing parks, (Capital Improvement Projects), parks that are built by public funds (referred to as Public Projects), parks that are built by private funds and turned over to the City (referred to as Turn-Key Project or
Developer Built Project), parks that are part of a joint use agreement and parks within City open space areas.
Other Regulating Documents
The design of parks shall also include the standards and requirements of the cited reference documents found in Appendix ‘C’. If conflicts arise between this manual and other governing documents, contact the City Project Manager for clarification. DESCRIPTION OF CHANGES
1.2.1

General Changes
In general, the 2005 ‘Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and Development’ has been updated to meet new local, state and federal requirements. The street rights­ of-way and open space landscaping standards are found in the San Diego
Municipal Code - Land Development Code. All development in open spaces must meet the requirements of the Consultant’s Guide and the Municipal Code.
The section, “Project Process, Submittals and Approvals”, has been revised to conform with the new City Council Policy #600-33, “Community Notification and Input for City Wide Park Development Projects’.

1.2.2

Specific Changes
See also the Landscape Standards - Sections One through Five, a technical guide to the Municipal Code, formerly known as the Landscape Technical Manual, for additional information on Street Rights-of-Way and Open Space requirements.
Check lists for joint use parks has been added see Appendix “M”.

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2.

PARK DESIGN STANDARDS

2.1

TYPES OF RECREATIONAL PARKS

The City of San Diego provides three types of recreational parks for residents and visitors: 1)
Resource-Based Parks, 2) Population-Based Parks, and 3) Special Recreational Parks. Resource­ based parks serve users from the entire city and elsewhere, and are located at or centered around natural or man-made features. Beaches (Mission Bay Park), historical sites (Balboa Park), and natural canyons and water courses (Mission Trails Regional Park), are examples of this type of park. Population-based parks are intended to serve the local daily needs of residential areas.
Where possible they adjoin schools in order to share facilities, and ideally are within walking distance of the residences within their service area. The City also provides other special and smaller recreational parks that are neither population-based nor resource-based; these include developed parks within open space, plazas, large and small landscaped areas, and pocket parks.
2.1.1

Resource-Based Parks
Are intended to preserve and make available to the public areas of outstanding scenic, natural, or cultural interest. They are meant to supplement the neighborhood and community parks, and they serve the entire City and its visitors rather than any one community. However, they can also function to fulfill local neighborhood and community park needs of surrounding residents.

2.1.2

Population-Based Parks
Are typically of two categories: Community Parks and Neighborhood Parks.
2.1.2.1Community Parks: Community Parks typically serve 18,000 to 25,000 residents within approximately a 1-1/2 mile radius. Ideally they should have at least 13 useable acres if adjacent to a school or 20 useable acres if not adjacent to a school (“useable acres” is defined as being 2% or less in grade). They should provide a wide range of facilities that supplement those of the neighborhood parks and which are determined by the needs and preferences of the community.
Recreation centers, athletic fields, multipurpose courts, picnic facilities, play areas, parking areas, and comfort stations, landscaping and lawn areas are standard amenities. When possible and desirable, swimming pools and tennis courts may be provided.
2.1.2.2 Neighborhood Parks: Neighborhood Parks serve a resident population of 3,500 to 5,000 persons within approximately a one half mile radius. Ideally, they should have a minimum useable area of five acres when located adjacent to a school or 10 useable acres when not adjacent to a school. The design and type of facilities should be determined by the population and use characteristics of the neighborhood. Play areas, multi-purpose fields, comfort stations, multipurpose
3

courts, picnic facilities, landscaping and lawn areas are typical amenities in neighborhood parks.
2.1.3

2.2

Special Parks
Special Parks are smaller than community or neighborhood parks (2 acres or smaller) and contain passive recreation activities. These parks, sometimes called
‘Pocket Parks’ or Renaissance Parks or ‘Mini-Parks’, are often built by a
Developer as a condition of a Land Development Permit and then turned over to the City to maintain. Walkways, trails, benches, shade structures and small play areas are typical amenities of these parks.

DESIGN STANDARDS

The following design standards address functional and aesthetic issues for park and open space design, and are to be referenced and utilized during the formulation of General Development
Plans and the final Construction Plans. ( See Appendix B, Council Policy 200-14, Landscape
Design Guidelines.) All parks and open space shall meet the following guidelines and regulations (the stricter rule applies): Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations; Title
24 of the California Administrative Code; American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards; Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC); the Greenbook Specifications for
Public Works ; San Diego Municipal Code; City of San Diego Standard Drawings; Uniform
Building Code (UBC) and the City of San Diego Rules and Regulations for Reclaimed Water
Use, when applicable. The Design Consultant shall verify with the City Project Manager the project program, the specific size and functional requirements for the programmed facilities and the project budget prior to beginning the design process.
The design consultant has the sole responsibility to design a project in compliance with current and adopted ADA/ADAAG (Federal) and CBC (State) access law requirements. This guideline is for information only and does not relieve the design consultant of liability in any way. Failure to design in conformity by law should be remedied at consultant=s own expense. Please note that the more stringent requirements of the ADA/ADAAG or CBC shall apply to the design. It is the design consultant=s responsibility to implement the stricter standard to the project. The City will not be responsible for anything that is missed in the evaluation and plan review of the design.
2.2.1

Site Planning
Park design and site planning shall include analysis and integration of on-site and off-site features such as: bicycle and pedestrian trails, open space areas, topography, views, existing vegetation and joint-use needs of adjacent schools.
Community Plans, Master or Precise Plans, General Development Plans and other
City planning documents should be referenced when analyzing and evaluating the project during site planning.
4

2.2.2

Grading and Drainage
All park projects shall have positive drainage (drainage is to be directed away from buildings, electrical enclosures, backstops and irrigation controllers) and provide the necessary components for drainage.
2.2.2.1 Site Grading and Drainage: Shall conform to the following requirements: Use
Paving:
(Pedestrian walkways and monolithic surfaces of concrete, asphalt or unit pavers)

Grade
1.5 % min. – 4.5% max.
1.5 % max. cross slope, no exceptions.
Paving outside of street rights-of-way shall meet current T-24/ADA accessibility guidelines. Basketball and Volleyball Courts:
(Multi-Purpose Paved Courts)

Drain end to end at 1%

Tennis Courts:

Drain side to side or end to end at 1 %, never allow high point at net.

Multi-Purpose Fields:

1.5 % min. - 2 % max.

Softball Fields:

1.5% for skinned and turf infields, outfield turf, provide positive drainage away from home plate in all cases.

Parking Areas:
(Asphalt)

1 % min. - 4 % max. with a 4. 5 % cross slope or 1.5 % where disabled access is provided, no exceptions.

Lawn Areas:
(Passive recreation)

2 % min. - 20 % max.(5:1)

Shrub and Groundcover Areas:

2 % min. - 50 % max (2:1)

Mulch Areas:

2 % min. - 33 % max. (3:1)

2.2.2.2 Drainage Systems: Area drainage systems shall be designed and sized per flow requirements and engineered accordingly. For drainage which exceeds the capacity of a 6” PVC pipe, the drainage system will conform to the City’s
Grading Development Regulations (Municipal Code 142.0101) and Drainage
Regulations (Municipal Code 142.0201).
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2.2.2.3 Storm Water Runoff and Best Management Practices: All park projects shall be designed to meet the Federal requirements of the ‘Clean Water
Act’. A Best Management Practices (BMP) plan shall be prepared for all park projects in order to control the long term erosion and reduce the amount of pollutants and other sediments discharged from the project site into the storm water system. In addition, a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) shall be prepared for the construction activity of the park when the park site is over one acre.
2.2.2.4 Finished Grade: Finish grade for lawn areas shall be 1” below walks, mow curbs or other paving, and finish grade for shrub, groundcover or mulch areas shall be 2” below.
2.2.2.5 Security: Grading and planting should be such that a police officer seated in a vehicle may observe the entire park while driving through or around it.
Avoid mounds or berms that provide hiding places.
2.2.3

Paving, Walkways and Mow Curbs
2.2.3.1 Paving and Walkway Designs: Walkways are provided in all parks for functional and aesthetic purposes. Functionally, walkways should provide a connection to different parts of the park and lead to special landmarks. Walkways that provide a loop system are preferred. Primary walkways in the park shall be concrete paving without color. At park perimeter(s) and parking lots, walkways should be located to provide a logical, convenient, and aesthetic means of accessing the park. Walkways should be accessible to all users and in some areas they must be designed for emergency and maintenance vehicles. Aesthetically, walkways should be designed for the user to enjoy on and off-site views and the different amenities of the park.
2.2.3.2 Walkway Locations: Where possible provide walkways to separate lawn areas from shrub and groundcover areas to reduce edging costs.
2.2.3.3 Walkway Widths:
Primary pedestrian/ maintenance access walkways
&security lighting

9’ wide (min.)

Walkways adjacent to ball field lights

12’ wide (min.)

Walkways adjacent to parking stalls without wheel stops

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9’ wide (min.)

Secondary pedestrian walkways without

maintenance access or security lighting

6’ wide (min.)

2.2.3.4 Walkway Construction: Walkway construction and reinforcement shall be based on the soils report. Soil testing shall be provided during the design phase and recommendations shall be included in the bid documents.
2.2.3.5 Walkway Expansion Joints: Concrete walkways shall have expansion joints and score lines as shown in the Standard Drawings G-7, 9 and 10.
2.2.3.6 Decomposed Granite Walkways or Trails: May be proposed as a secondary component of a park’s circulation system. These walkways shall be stabilized decomposed granite, pre-mixed by the plant at the rate recommended by the manufacturer, prior to delivery. Walkway depth and sub-base shall be based on the soils report. A weed barrier is recommended below all decomposed granite paving. Preferred walkway edging to be concrete or non-corrosive metal.
2.2.3.7 Mow Curbs: Concrete mow curbs shall be provided to separate all lawn areas from shrub or groundcover areas, to contain decomposed granite paving, under fencing, where fencing is adjacent to turf or ground cover that requires edging or mowing, as an integral component of any wall (both at the top and bottom where lawn is proposed or where it exists). Mow curb width to be 8” minimum. (See Standard Drawing L-3 for construction detailing.)
2.2.4

Fences and Walls
2.2.4.1 Fences: Parks should be designed functionally and visually as open as possible with as little fencing as possible. Fencing should only be provided for multipurpose fields or where there is a safety issue that cannot be addressed by some other means.
2.2.4.2 Tubular Steel Fencing: Used to maintain views or to be consistent with the project’s design theme. All components shall be tubular steel and galvanized
(free of burrs and sharp edges). Fence color to be a powder coated paint applied electrostatically. 2.2.4.3 Chain-Link Fencing: Vary in height and detailing as per the specific site use(s) and requirements. If the fence exceeds 8’ in height a mid-rail will be required ( see Standard Drawings M-5, M-6 & SDM-112). Specify a top and bottom rail for all chain link fences, and 9 gauge fabric before thermal coating, knuckled on top and bottom (not shown in Standard Drawings). All materials shall be free of burrs and sharp edges. Fence posts, chain link, rails and all hardware to be ‘thermally-fused poly-vinyl chloride’ coating (see Standard
7

Drawing SDM-112). Chain link fabric shall be located on the side adjacent to play or use areas.
2.2.4.4 Fence Gates: Gate openings for pedestrians shall be a minimum of 4’ wide. Gate openings for maintenance vehicles shall be a minimum of 14’ wide.
(See Standard Drawings M-5, SDM-100, SDM-112.)
2.2.4.5 Walls: Shall be designed and located to discourage skateboarding and graffiti vandalism.
2.2.4.6 Wall Caps and Railings: All concrete block walls shall be finished with a wall cap, made of precast units that are sized for the block, or a custom cap.
Retaining walls shall be installed with wall drains (see Standard Drawings C-1 through C-15). Safety railings shall be provided when walls are over 30” in height and adjacent to walkways, as necessary or required by Municipal Code.
2.2.5 Site Furniture
All parks shall have picnic tables, benches, drinking fountains, barbecues, bicycle racks, trash receptacles and other site furnishings as necessary. Types of site furniture selected shall be based on the type of park, design character, durability and maintenance. The site furnishings should compliment each other in color, materials and form. Site furniture shall be permanently secured to the concrete with dowels and epoxy or within decomposed granite paving per manufacturers recommendations. 2.2.5.1 Locations: Site furniture in lawn areas shall be spaced a minimum of 12’ from other site furniture, fencing/walls, and trees/shrubs to accommodate City lawn mowers. Site furniture shall be located to avoid conflicts with irrigation systems and other park improvements.
2.2.5.2 Picnic Tables: Shall be placed on concrete pads with a 1% cross slope for drainage. Pads shall extend 4’ beyond the table/bench dimensions on all sides.
Some of the picnic tables should be contiguous to walkways or have walkways leading to them for disabled access. Orientation of the picnic tables adjacent to walkways shall be perpendicular to walkways to discourage skateboard activity..
One piece tables with benches are preferred.
2.2.5.3 Park Benches: Shall be placed on a concrete pad when located in lawn areas and designed and located to discourage skateboard activity. Some of the park benches should provide an area for companion seating.

8

2.2.5.4 Drinking Fountains: Each park shall have at least one ‘High/Low’ drinking fountain for disabled access. (See Standard Drawings SDM-107 and M­
18). Fence-hung fountains may be used if a disabled access fountain has been provided elsewhere in the park. Provide a stainless steel High/Low fixture wall­ hung at the comfort station or a stainless steel High/Low pedestal fixture behind the backstop.
2.2.5.5 Barbecues and Hot Coal Receptacles: Metal barbecues shall be located outside the circulation routes and installed with a concrete hot coal receptacle in a visible location. If located in lawn areas, provide a concrete pad as a mow curb.
2.2.5.6 Bicycle Racks: Shall be located on concrete paving and outside the major circulation routes.
2.2.5.7 Trash Receptacles: Concrete trash receptacles shall be square and provided with side openings or top openings per the direction of the City Project
Manager. All trash receptacles shall have a protective ‘Hood’ cover.
2.2.6 Multi-Purpose Courts (Basketball and Volleyball Courts)
When possible and space permitting, basketball and volleyball courts shall be separate. When site constraints dictate. Courts can be combined into multi­ purpose courts. (See Standard Details, Appendix ‘J’.)
2.2.6.1 Basketball Courts: Shall be a poured concrete surface 104’ x 70’ in dimension, with a playing area of 84’ x 50’. Court construction and reinforcing shall be based on the soils report. Rebar dowels and sleeves to be provided at all cold joints and all sleeves shall be greased. Court surface to be a non-skid surface or a medium broom finish. All striping on the playing surface shall be applied using a wear-resistant substance. (See Standard Detail A-3, Appendix ‘J’.)
2.2.6.2 Basketball Court Placement: Preferred court orientation should be along north-south axis. The minimum distance between courts when two or more courts are side by side or end to end is 10’.
2.2.6.3 Basketball Goals: Backboard shall be all steel with emulsion type undercoat, fan shaped, 6’ extensions. Rims shall be double rimmed with nylon netting nets. Pole shall be galvanized steel. ( See standard Detail A-1 Appendix
“J”).
2.2.6.4 Paved Volleyball Courts: Shall be a poured concrete surface 50’ x 80’ in dimension, with a playing area of 30’ x 60’. Court construction and reinforcing shall be based on the soils report. Rebar dowels and sleeves to be provided at all cold joints and all sleeves shall be greased. Court surface to be a non-skid surface
9

or a medium broom finish. When two courts are side by side, there should be a minimum of 10’ between them. Courts placed end to end shall have a minimum distance of 15’ between them. (See Standard Detail A-1, Appendix ‘J’.)
2.2.6.5 Sand Volleyball Courts: Shall have a playing area of 30’ x 60’ with a
10’ safety zone on the sides and a 15’ safety zone on the ends, total area to be
50’ x 90’ in dimension. The sand shall be contained by a concrete curb, 8” minimum width, that is the same elevation around the perimeter of the court. The sand surfacing shall be a minimum of 12” deep. Sand shall be imported, clean, doubled washed, manufactured #20 silica sand, free of deleterious organic materials, with a “mean effective size” between .55” and .65”. A subsurface drainage system shall be provided that connects to the site drainage system.
Leach lines or sumps may be considered if a storm drain is not available and if approved by the City Project Manager.
2.2.6.6 Volleyball Nets and Poles: All volleyball standards shall be galvanized.
The net post shall be 8’ above the finish playing surface. The net shall have the cable along the top and rope along the bottom. The pole spacing shall accommodate a 32’ x 3’ net.
2.2.7

Tennis Courts
2.2.7.1 Tennis Court: Shall be a poured concrete surface 36’ x 78’, with 12’ side clearance on each side, and 21’ between each baseline and the fence. Court construction and reinforcing shall be based on the soils report. Score lines (saw cut) per soils report shall be provided to eliminate stress cracking in monolithic pours. Rebar dowels and sleeves to be provided at all cold joints and all sleeves shall be greased. Court surface to be a non-skid surface. The courts will have markings for both singles and doubles play. Lines shall be painted 2” wide, except for the baseline which shall be painted 4” wide. (See Standard Detail B-1,
Appendix ‘J’.)
2.2.7.2 Orientation and Placement: Preferred orientation should be long axis north-south (recommended 22 degrees west of north). The minimum distance between courts when two or more courts are side-to-side or end-to-end should be
12’ between adjacent side lines. When two or more courts are placed side-to-side, a 12’ high fence shall separate the courts by extending 24’ in from the rear of the courts. Minimum distance between each end of court and fence shall be 21’.
2.2.7.3 Tennis Court Fencing: Fencing shall be 12’ high with chain link fabric installed on the inside of the court. Fence posts, chain link, rails and hardware be black ‘thermally-fused poly-vinyl chloride’. Fine mesh wind screening shall be
10

attached to the inside of the fence. Gates shall be located within the fence so as to disrupt play as little as possible. (See Standard Drawing M-17 and SDM-112.)

2.2.8 Swimming Pools
Specific facilities and site detailing to be coordinated with the Park and
Recreation Department Aquatics Program, the Maintenance Staff and the City
Project Manager.
2.2.8.1 Swimming Pool Requirements and Standards:
(1)
Codes and Regulations: All new and retrofitted swimming pools shall meet current ADA requirements and State Bathing Codes. (The Design,
Construction, Operation and Maintenance of Public Swimming Pools.)
(2)
Deep Water: The deep area of the pool shall be designed to accommodate competitive swimming, water polo and synchronized swimming
(25 yards by either 25 or 50 meters) with a minimum of six lanes at a minimum depth of 9’. Deep water is also required for high level instruction (lifeguard training and diving instruction). Orientation for lap lanes should be north/south, however, anchor sockets should be installed so that lane directions can be changed to allow for multiple programs in pool at one time.
(3)
Shallow Water: The shallow area of the pool shall be designed to best serve the instructional needs of participants. Shallow areas shall be between 0” and 5’ with the majority of the shallow water being in the 18” to 4’ range.
(4)
First Aid Room: Facilities shall have a separate room in which to administer first aid.
(5)
Pool Manager’s Office: Must connect to main front office area (where guests pay to enter facility) and be provided a view of the pool area.
(6)
Deck Area Lighting: Pool deck shall be provided with sufficient lighting so that persons walking on the deck can identify hazards.
(7)
Sinks: Men’s and women’s restrooms shall be equipped with sensor activated sinks to minimize contamination.
(8)

Soap Dispenser: Provide a soap dispenser for each sink in restroom.

11

(9)
Electric Hand Dryer: Provide one electric hand dryer inside restroom for each pair of sinks. (Heat element disconnected).
(10) Toilet Paper Dispensers: Provide in each restroom stall and shall be anti-theft multi-roll with two or more roll storage capacity.
(11) Diaper Changing Stations: Provide one changing station in both men’s and women’s locker areas.
(12) Family Changing Room: Provide a minimum of one family changing room, with a shower, sink, toilet and bench.
(13) Access Into the Pool: A ramp or zero depth entry shall be provided into the pool.
(14) Spectator Seating: A spectator seating area that is physically separated from the pool deck shall be provided.
(15) Class Room/ Meeting Room: If the pool is a separate, stand-alone facility, a large meeting room shall be provided for special events, meetings, community aquatic safety training courses and staff training.
(16) Storage Area: A storage area (with shelving) for pool equipment and instructional items shall be provided.
(17)

Shade Structure: Shall be provided on the deck area.

(18)

Emergency/ Repair Vehicle Access: Provide a 14’ wide, double gate at the

deck area for emergency and repair vehicles.
2.2.9

Multi-Purpose Fields (Softball and Soccer Fields / Turf Areas)
2.2.9.1 Multi-Purpose Fields: Shall be free of all ½” diameter or larger rock to a depth of 15”, or the field shall be provided with a 15” layer of topsoil and meet the horticultural requirements per the “Greenbook” for Class “A” topsoil.
2.2.9.2 Softball Fields: Base length: 65’ minimum. Foul Line distance: 250’ radius minimum. Home Plate to Backstop distance: 20’. Drainage catch basins or manholes should not be located within the field of play. (See Standard Detail,
Appendix ‘J’.)
2.2.9.3 Field Orientation: The preferred orientation places the batter facing the pitcher in a northerly direction with a line from home plate to the pitcher’s mound
12

not deviating more than 20 degrees east or west of north, and the first base line running in a west to east orientation. However, optimum utilization, or configuration of the site, may required deviation from the preferred orientation.
2.2.9.4 Field Drainage: The fields will typically be crowned in the center with drainage to the sides. Certain sites and field overlay situations would make this drainage pattern unacceptable. In such cases, other drainage patterns or drainage devices will be considered and approved by the City Project Manager. In all cases there will be positive drainage away from home plate.
2.2.9.5 Softball Field Infield Mix: Shall meet the following requirement:
Grain Size Distribution/ Percent Passing
Sieve Size
No. 4
No. 8
No. 16
No. 30
No. 50
No. 100
No. 200

Minimum
100%
90%
85%
65%
35%
20%
10%

Maximum
100%
95%
85%
55%
35%
25%

Clay Content: Shall be between 10 -15%.

Sand Equivalent: Shall be 15 - 25%, as per test method. (Calif. 217

or ASTM D2419)

ph: Shall be 6 - 8.5

Color: Gold is preferred. Red is acceptable.

Depth of Infield Mix: 4” to 6”

2.2.9.6 Certification of the Infield Mix Requirements: Shall be furnished by the Contractor to the Resident Engineer or Project Manager at the time of project submittals. Infield areas shall not be amended with soil conditioners used for planting areas.
2.2.9.7 Infield Dust Control: Provide two quick coupler valves in the lawn area just beyond the perimeter of the infield. These valves to be at the finish grade.
Additionally, provide a manually controlled system of high speed rotors at the perimeter of the infield to wet the infield evenly and quickly.

13

2.2.9.8 Fencing and Backstop: Refer to Standard Detail C-1 thru C-6, Appendix
‘J’. Deviations from the detail require City Project Manager approval.
2.2.9.9 Access to Softball Field Lighting: Maintenance access to the lights shall be provided by concrete walkways (concrete designed for heavy equipment) or
12’ wide access gates shall be provided in the fencing.
2.2.9.10 Electrical Requirements: Verify location for the electrical outlet for the use of a pitching machine with the City Project Manager. The outlet can be located in a lockable stainless steel box behind the backstop or the backstop fence or provided adjacent to the pitcher’s mound in a lockable water proof box within an 8” gate valve box.
2.2.9.11 Softball Bleachers: Shall be hot dipped galvanized steel, 3 rows minimum or 5 rows typical and 15’ long. Bleachers with 5 rows require a guardrail. Specify spot welding of seats and foot planks to bleacher frame (free of burrs and sharp edges). Bleachers shall be placed a maximum of 4’ from the fence line of the backstop.
2.2.9.12 Soccer Fields: Preferred size is 225’ x 360’ with a clear zone of 9’ on all sides, ( soccer field size may vary depending on site constraints, confirm with the City Project Manager the actual size of the soccer field). The playing surface shall not overlay onto the skinned infield of a softball field. The field area shall be free of drainage catch basins and manholes.
2.2.9.13 Soccer Field Orientation and Placement: Preferred orientation is with the long axis north-south. Multiple fields being placed adjacent to one another shall be placed side by side. Fields may be “off-set” to facilitate field layout, but may not be end to end.
2.2.10 Playgrounds and Equipment
Playgrounds shall be designed to offer the greatest “play value” possible within the budgetary constraints and physical restrictions of the site. The play experience should challenge the users by addressing their physical, social and mental development while providing entertainment. The play environment shall be safe, durable, vandal resistant and require minimal maintenance. Playgrounds and equipment shall meet the current requirements of Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA); Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) Handbook for
Public Playground Safety; and the American Society for Testing and Materials’
(ASTM)(F-1487) Standard Consumer Safety Performance Specification for
Playground Equipment for Public Use (F-1292), Standard Specification for
14

Impact Attenuation of Surface Systems Under and Around Playground Equipment and Standard Specification for Determination of Accessibility of Surface Systems
Under and Around Playground Equipment (F-1951).

2.2.10.1 General Play Area Requirements:
(1)

Play Areas: Play areas for “preschool” children (ages 2-5 years) shall be separated from play areas for “school-age” children (ages 5-12 years).

(2)

Play Area Hazards: Barbecues, hot coal receptacles and plant materials with thorns or stickers, or that attract bees, or other potential hazards shall not be located adjacent to play areas. Trees are not allowed to overhang safety zones of play equipment.

(3)

Play Area Maintenance: Play areas with sand surfacing shall not be located adjacent to a gymnasium or recreation center to prevent tracking of sand indoors. Drinking fountains shall not be located adjacent to play areas with sand surfacing, but in close proximity.

(4)

Disabled Access: Current ADA requirements are now adopted federally, and though the requirements are for about a third of the equipment to be disabled accessible, the Park & Recreation Department prefers to maximize ground-level play components and to provide resilient accessible surfacing to a minimum of 50% of the play equipment.

(5)

Seating: Provide seating close enough to play areas for adults to supervise children. Seating shall be designed to meet ADA requirements, and shall be designed or located to discourage skateboard damage. Install outside of the play area as directed in 2.2.5 Site Furniture, and 2.2.5.3,
Park Benches.

2.2.10.2 Play Area Drainage and Construction:
(1)

Subgrade: The play area subgrade shall be sloped to a subsurface drainage system (1.5% minimum) for all play area surfaces. Concrete sub-base for poured in place rubber surfacing shall slope at 1% minimum towards drain inlet or sump. Subgrade for concrete sub-base shall be compacted to 95% minimum.

15

(2)

Subsurface Drainage Systems: A subsurface drainage system shall be provided for all play surfaces. This system shall be designed for positive flow for the play area square footage. The drain lines shall contain a clean out before it empties into a storm drain. Leach lines or sumps may be considered if a storm drain is not available and approved by the City
Project Manager. If sumps are needed, design them outside of the play area, if possible, to minimize the amount of drainage rock that infiltrates the play area in the event children dig down and pull up the filter fabric, or repairs to the play equipment requires digging.

(3)

Play Area Containment: New play areas of sand or engineered wood fiber shall be contained by a minimum 4’ wide concrete walk with a deepened footing set at a continuous elevation. Sand shall be a minimum
4” below the adjacent paving. Engineered wood fiber may be flush, or up to 4” below adjacent paving, after settlement. The area surrounding the play area shall be graded so that runoff flows away from the play area. If the play area is contained with a wall adjacent to a turf area, the wall shall include an 8” wide concrete mow edge at the base of the wall, slope at 2% away from wall.

(4)

Play Area Walkway: A minimum 4’ wide concrete walkway shall be provided all around play areas. At existing concrete containment curb or low wall, the walkway shall be installed with an expansion joint adjacent to the concrete containment curb or wall. Walkways shall provide a 1.5% gradient away from the play area.

2.2.10.3 Play Area Surfacing Materials: Acceptable surfacing material includes sand, engineered wood fiber, loose rubber fill or rubberized paving to a depth of
12”. If both sand and engineered wood products or loose rubber fill are used in the same play area, then they shall be separated from each other by a minimum of
10’ of paving or rubberized surfacing.
(1)

Sand: Shall be imported, clean, double washed, manufactured #20 silica sand, free of deleterious organic material, loam, clay and debris, with a
“mean effective size” between 0.55” min. and 0.65” max. and a “mean uniformity coefficient” between 1.00 and 1.54. The contractor shall submit certification of the above requirement to the Resident Engineer at time of product submittals. Sand shall only be used with a filter fabric and drain system. Depth shall be 12” minimum, and shall be of a thickness sufficient to attenuate falls per ASTM F1292.

16

(2)

Engineered Wood Fiber: Shall be an energy absorbing protective surfacing manufactured for playground installations. The manufactured fibrous crushed wood product (tumbled, with blunt ends) shall consist of random sized wood fibers comprised of but not limited to soft wood such as; Ponderosa Pine, Douglas Fir, Spruce and/or White Pine. The particle size shall be between ½” and 3” in length, and not less than 3/8” in width nor 1/16” in thickness. At least 85% by volume of the manufactured wood product shall be the sizes specified. It shall be non-toxic, free of bark and organic materials, independently tested by ASTM Standard F1292, with sufficient fines to comply with ADA requirements, while maintaining
Head Impact Criteria (HIC). Engineered wood fiber shall only be used with a filter fabric and drain system. Depth shall be 12” minimum, and shall be of a thickness sufficient to attenuate falls per ASTM F1292. A ramp which conforms to ADA and Title 24 requirements for disabled access shall be provided within 20’ of each entry or exit to a play structure, unless an approved bonding agent has been added.

(3)

Loose Rubber Fill: Shall meet the requirements of CPSC and ASTM for play areas. Color shall be brown or tan. Rubber shall be clean, with no fiber or steel radial remnants. Depth shall be of a thickness sufficient to attenuate falls per ASTM F1292. A ramp which conforms to ADA and
Title 24 requirements for disabled access shall be provided.

(4)

Interlocking Rubber Pavers: Shall meet the requirements of CPSC and
ASTM for play areas. Only pavers which have joints that will not trap sand or dirt in the process of expansion and contraction are allowed, similar or equal to Play Mattas (no known equal). Pavers may be placed on asphalt or concrete sub base, and shall be of a thickness sufficient to attenuate falls per ASTM F1292.

(5)

Poured-in-Place Rubberized Paving: Shall meet the requirements of
CPSC and ASTM for play areas. All rubberized paving shall be installed on a concrete sub-base. Color EPDM layer shall be ½” – 5/8” thick.
Buffings layer shall be of a thickness sufficient to attenuate falls per
ASTM F1292. A thickened color layer shall be keyed into surface adjacent to transition to concrete pavement. 30 degree cant into adjacent sand play area shall be keyed into concrete sub-base.

2.2.10.4 General Play Equipment Criteria:
(1)

Disapproved Play Equipment: The following equipment is not allowed by the Park and Recreation Department: Plastic decks; decks with center
17

access, unless rails are placed 90 degrees to main access or circulation patterns, perforations in excess of 3/16” in decks over 30” in height, decks which are secured with self-tapping screws, climbing walls in vertical orientation on decks over 30” in height (must be canted), climbers that do not have head clearance, enclosed tunnel-slides or level tunnels (unless made of a mesh material); bubble panels; lexan or plexiglass ‘windows’; sectional slides; wood components; metal slides; dark colored plastic slides in any orientation; movable digging shovel toys that do not have a safety stop; whirlers (unless equipped with brakes); see-saws with fulcrum points (springs are acceptable); pinch-type coil spring base animals; swings with heavy animal figures; half-bucket swing seats with chains to secure occupants; vinyl-clad cargo nets (except with non-slip clad, rigid horizontal bars); vinyl-clad swing chains; rigid swing seats; non­ reinforced swing seats (must be slash resistant); cable components; roller slides. Recycled plastic structures are not prohibited, but should be limited to low-volume playgrounds, unless reinforced with metal bracing.
(Refer to appendix ‘L’ for a detailed listing.)
(2)

Substitutions: At the time of product submittals, any substitutions of specified play equipment on construction plans must fit the designed play area and be approved by the City Project Manager and a National
Playground Safety Institute (NPSI) Certified Play Ground Inspector. Shop drawings or catalog cuts are required in order to make a determination.

(3)

Equipment Installation: All play equipment shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. The Construction
Documents shall specify that the play equipment shall be installed as late in the construction process as possible.

(4)

Equipment Footings: The tops of all play equipment footings shall be
12” below finish grade of surfacing material, with a smooth finish, except for spring animals. Spring animals shall have footing edges chamfered at
45° or rounded with a 2” minimum radius and exposed bolts cut at the nut and spot welded, and be 3” to 6” below finish grade.

(5)

Steel or Aluminum Play Equipment: Shall be colored by electrostatically applied powder coating or hot dipped galvanized with fused vinyl coating, minimum thickness of 5-7 mils.

(6)

Product Availability: Limit specification of products to those available within the United States so replacement parts are more readily available.

18

2.2.10.5 Safety Standards for Play Equipment:
(1)

Modular Play Equipment: Platforms on modular equipment shall be punched steel with 3/16” diameter holes on decks over 30” in height (to prevent fingers protruding up from below being crushed from above and minimize potential for hood drawstrings to be caught in larger deck openings at the top of slides) with non-skid surfacing and 6’ maximum height. Low (,

6.

• 1>,

6.

j

• 1>,

- - - - 2-1/2" DIA. GALVANIZED IRON PIPE
HUB 30" DEEP AT BASE
OF EACH BACKSTOP POST
(7 LOCATIONS)
6"

• 6.

12" [ '

BATTER BOARD AT BACKSTOP
SECTION VIEW SCALE: NONE

2" GALVANIZED ---1---~
IRON PIPE
WELD
LOCATIONS

BATTER BOARD
(TOP VIEW)

TRIM BOLTS TWO THREADS
ABOVE NUT & PEEN ENDS

NOTE:

(D

2" X 1-1 /2" X 4' GALVANIZED ANGLE IRON, WELD TO PIPE. SECURE 2 X 10 BATTER
BOARDS TO ANGLE IRON WITH TWO (2) 1/2" X 3" LONG CARRIAGE BOLTS AT EACH LOCATION.

BATTER BOARD AT BACKSTOP
PLAN VIEW
SCALE: NONE
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

Appendix J - Detail C-5

APPENDIX J

January 2005

.• I>...

...

A•



OF BACKSTOP

3" OF CONCRETE
IN FRONT OF
POST·

A•



.•

I>

--?


X

.•

I>

x-·

SEE DETAIL
BELOW

20'-0"

6'-0"

l
NOTES:

1)

CD

13'-6"

3'-6"

10'-0"

27'-o"

BACKSTOP

TOP VIEW

SCALE:

NONE

SEE BACKSTOP NOTES.

2-1/2" GALVANIZED IRON PIPE HUBS 30" DEEP AT BASE

OF EACH POST (TOTAL 7) WITH CONCRETE FOOTING, SEE DETAIL 3-5.

(};

1-1 /2" GALVANIZED IRON PIPE (lYP.).

G)

2" GALVANIZED IRON PIPE (lYP.).

t
1 " CLEARANCE
FENCE MESH
FABRIC
GALVANIZED
PIPE MEMBERS

DETAIL VIEW
SCALE:

NONE

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

Appendix J - Detail C-4

APPENDIX J

January 2005

ARCHES & BRACES:
1-1 /2" GALVANIZED IRON
PIPE (lYP.)

4'

"

18'-o"

6-GAUGE
WIRE MESH
BOTIOM
PANELS
ONLY

1" MAX
FROM BOTIOM
OF RAIL TO
FINISH SURFACE
OF INFIELD

2 X 10
BATIER
BOARDS
(lYP)

NOTES:
1)

ALL PIPE FRAME TO BE 2" GALVANIZED IRON PIPE, EXCEPT AS NOTED ABOVE.

2)

SEE BACKSTOP NOTES.

@

3/4" X 3/16" TENSION BAR WITH 1" X 14-GAUGE BANDS 12" ON CENTER (lYP.).

@

3/4" X 3/16" TENSION BAR WITH 1" X 14-GAUGE BANDS 8" ON CENTER (lYP.).

BACKSTOP
REAR ELEVATION

SCALE:

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

NONE
Appendix J - Detail C-3

APPENDIX J

January 2005

ARCHES & BRACES-----,.,-­
1-1/2 " GALVANIZED
IRON PIPE (TYP.)

9-GAUGE WIRE
MESH (TYP.)

t

8'-o"
10'-0

18"-0"

6'-o"

t 9-GAUGE

t

WIRE
MESH (TYP.)

4'-o"

~
----11-r---

SEE
DETAIL 3-5

6-GAUGE WIRE
MESH (TYP.)
BOTIOM PANELS
ONLY

1" MAX FROM
BOTIOM OF
RAIL TO FINISH
SURFACE OF
INFIELD

5'-2"
10'-4"----+1
1+-------­
20'-0" --------~

NOTES:
1)
2)

@
@

ALL PIPE FRAME TO BE 2" GALVANIZED IRON PIPE, EXCEPT AS NOTED ABOVE.
SEE BACKSTOP NOTES.
3/4" X 3/16" TENSION BAR WITH 1" X 14-GAUGE BANDS 12" ON CENTER (TYP.).
3/4" X 3/16" TENSION BAR WITH 1" X 14-GAUGE BANDS 8" ON CENTER (TYP.).

BACKSTOP
SIDE ELEVATION

SCALE:

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

NONE
Appendix J - Detail C-2

APPENDIX J

January 2005
BLEACHER LOCATION TO BE
DETERMINED
IN THE FIELD
A ,
A'

,

A•

'

40'-o"
~-- BACKSTOP

. .

3-2, 3-3, 3-4, 3-5

• I>

4 ,•

.

250' CHALKED
FOUL LINE

SEE DETAILS

·.

.. .

• • I>

A •



.. .
65'-o"

GRASS

FIELD

SQUARE
A •



..• I> .

~
...

"SKINNED"
INFIELD

NOTES:
1) BACKSTOP AREA IS SYMMETRICAL ABOUT THE CENTER LINE, EXCEPT AS NOTED ABOVE.

2)

DIMENSIONS ARE TO CENTER LINE OF FENCE POSTS.

3)

CONTRACTOR SHALL INSTALL HOME PLATE AND PLACE GUINEAS

AT BASE LOCATIONS FOR FUTURE BASES (BASES BY OTHERS).

4)

TIE BACKSTOP IN AS PART OF FENCE, SEE BACKSTOP NOTES.

5)

SEE FENCING NOTES.

@

12' HIGH BLACK VINYL CHAIN LINK FENCE AND POSTS PER SDRSD SDM-112.

@

8' HIGH BLACK VINYL CHAIN LINK FENCE AND POSTS PER SDRSD SDM-112.

SOFTBALL FIELD
PLAN VIEW
SCALE:

NONE

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

Appendix J - Detail C-1

APPENDIX J

January 2005
1---------

60'---------1

WEAR AREA
(WITHIN DASHED
LINES)
TERRA COTIA
COLOR COAT
(EXTERIOR)

~

120'

GREEN COLOR
COAT (INTERIOR)

~

WEAR AREA
(WITHIN DASHED
LINES)

NOTE:
1)

WEAR AREA TO RECEIVE ADDITIONAL COLOR COAT OF COURT SURFACING

PER SPECIFICATIONS.

TENNIS COURT COLOR COATING
SCALE: NONE
PLAN VIEW
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego

Appendix J - Detail B-2

APPENDIX K

January 2005

CITY OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

COUNCIL POLICY

SUBJECT: SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICY
POLICY NO.: 900-14
EFFECTIVE DATE: May 20, 2003
BACKGROUND:
Existing buildings and the building development industry consume nearly half of the total energy used in the United States. The City of San Diego’s commitment to become increasingly efficient with resources, including energy, water, and materials associated with construction projects, is demonstrated in Council Policy 900-14 “Green Building Policy” adopted in 1997, Council
Policy 900-16 “Community Energy Partnership,” adopted in 2000, and the updated Council
Policy 900-14 “Sustainable Buildings Expedite Program” adopted in 2001.
On April 16, 2002, the Mayor and City Council adopted CMR 02-060 which requires City projects to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED silver standard for all new buildings and major renovations over 5,000 square feet. This places San Diego among the most progressive cities in the nation in terms of sustainable building policies.
As a participant in the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) Cities for Climate Protection Program, as a Charter member in the California Climate Action Registry and as an active member of the U.S. Green Building Council, the City of San Diego is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by implementing more sustainable practices, including green building technologies.
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this policy is to reassert the City’s commitment to green building practices in City facilities, and to provide leadership and guidance in promoting, facilitating, and instituting such practices in the community.
POLICY:
The following principles will be required for all newly constructed facilities and major building renovation projects for City facilities:
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design):
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
128

APPENDIX K

January 2005

The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System is a voluntary, consensus-based national standard for developing high-performance, sustainable buildings. Members of the U.S. Green Building Council representing all segments of the building industry developed LEED and continue to contribute to its evolution.
The City of San Diego is committed to achieving LEED “Silver” Level Certification for all new City facilities and major building renovation projects over 5,000 square feet.
SUSTAINABLE BUILDING MEASURES:
In addition to achieving LEED “Silver” Level Certification, Council Policy 900-14 encourages the following sustainable building measures for all newly constructed facilities and major renovation projects regardless of square footage:
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Design and construct mechanical and electrical systems to achieve the maximum energy efficiency achievable with current technology. Consultants shall use computer modeling programs, (Energy Pro) to analyze the effects of various design options and select the set of options producing the most efficient integrated design. Energy efficiency measures shall be selected to achieve energy efficiencies at least 22.51% better than California’s
Title 24.2001 standards for both new construction and major renovation projects.
Incorporate self-generation using renewable technologies to reduce environmental impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use. Newly constructed City facilities shall generate a minimum of 10%, with a goal of 20% from renewable technologies (e.g., photovoltaic, wind and fuel cells).
Eliminate the use of CFC based refrigerants in newly constructed facilities and major building renovations and retrofits for all heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigerant-based building systems.
Incorporate additional commissioning and measurement and verification procedures as outlined by LEED 2.0 Rating System, Energy and Atmospheres, credit 3 and credit 5 for all projects over 20,000 sq. ft.
Reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminates that are odorous or potentially materials will include adhesives, paints, coatings carpet systems, composite wood and agri-fiber products. In order to maximize energy efficiency measures within these requirements, projects will combine energy efficiency measures requiring longer payback periods, with measures requiring shorter payback periods to determine the overall project period.
Comply with the storm water development requirements in the Storm Water Management and Discharge Control Ordinance (Municipal Code § 43.03), and the City’s grading and drainage regulations and implementing documents (MC § 142.01 and 142.02, respectively). Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
129

APPENDIX K

January 2005

In addition to achieving the minimum sustainable building measure this Council Policy encourages the following measures be incorporated into newly constructed facilities and major renovation projects whenever possible:
1.

Use high efficiency irrigation technology, drought tolerant native plants and recycled site water to reduce potable water for irrigation by 50%. Additionally, building water consumption should be reduced by 30%.

2.

Limit disruption of natural water flows and minimize storm water runoff by minimizing building footprints and other impervious areas, increasing on-site infiltration, preserving and/or restoring natural drainage systems, and reducing contaminates introduced into San
Diego’s bays, beaches and the ocean.

3.

Facilitate the reduction of waste generated by building occupants that is hauled to and disposed of in landfills. Provide an easily accessible area that serves the entire building and is dedicated to the separation, collection and storage of materials for recycling.
Recycling should include paper, glass, plastic and metals at a minimum.

4.

Incorporate building products that have recycled content reducing the impacts resulting from the extraction of new materials. Newly constructed City facilities shall have a minimum of 25% of building materials that contain in aggregate, a minimum weighted average of 20% post consumer recycled content materials.
Reduce the use and depletion of finite raw and long-cycle renewable materials by replacing them with rapidly renewable materials. Newly constructed City facilities should consider incorporating rapidly renewable building materials for 5% of the total building materials.

5.

6.

Establish minimum indoor air quality (IAQ) performance to prevent the development of indoor air quality problems in buildings, maintaining the health and well being of the occupants. Newly constructed City facilities will comply with IAQ by conforming to
ASHRAE 62-1999.

7.

City buildings will be designed to take the maximum advantage of passive and natural sources of heat, cooling, ventilation and light.

The Environmental Services Department, Energy Conservation and Management Division has been designated by this Council Policy as the clearing authority for issues relating to energy for the City of San Diego. The Energy Conservation and Management Division will enter into a
Memorandum of Understanding with those City Departments who design, renovate and build new city owned facilities to insure all new City facilities reflect the intent of Council Policy
900-14.

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
130

APPENDIX K

January 2005

PRIVATE-SECTOR/INCENTIVES:

It shall be the policy of the City Council to expedite the ministerial process for projects which meet the following criteria:
1.

Residential projects that provide 50% of their projected total energy use utilizing renewable energy resources, (e.g., photovoltaic, wind and fuel cells).

2.

Commercial and industrial projects that provide 30% of their projected total energy use utilizing renewable energy resources, (e.g., photovoltaic, wind and fuel cells).
Residential and commercial and industrial projects that exceed the State of California
Title 24 energy requirements by:
a.
15% better than California’s Title 24.2001 for Residential Buildings.
b.
10% better than California’s Title 24.2001 for Commercial and Industrial
Buildings.

3.

It shall be the policy of the City Council to expedite the discretionary process for projects which meet the following criteria:
1.

Incorporate the U.S. Green Building Council, Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) 2.0 Rating System “Silver” Level Certification for commercial development projects.

2.

Incorporate self-generation through renewable technologies (e.g., photovoltaic, wind and fuel cells) to reduce environmental impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use for commercial and industrial projects generating a minimum of 30% or more of the designed energy consumption from renewable technologies such as photovoltaic, wind and fuel cells.

3.

Residential discretionary projects of 4 units or more within urbanized communities as defined in the Progress Guide and General Plan that provide 50% of their projected total energy use utilizing renewable energy resources.

HEALTH AND RESOURCE CONSERVATION:
1.

Projects will be designed to avoid inflicting permanent adverse impact on the natural state of the air, land and water, by using resources and methods that minimize pollution and waste, and do not cause permanent damage to the earth, including erosion.

2.

Projects will include innovative strategies and technologies such as porous paving to conserve water, reduce effluent and run-off, thus recharging the water table.

3.

When feasible, native plants will be used in landscaping to reduce pesticide, fertilizer, and water usage.
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
131

APPENDIX K

January 2005

4.

Buildings will be constructed and operated using materials, methods, mechanical contamination by carcinogens, volatile organic compounds, fungi, molds, bacteria, and other known toxins.

5.

Projects will be planned to minimize waste through the use of a variety of strategies such as: a) reuse of materials or the highest practical recycled content; b) raw materials derived from sustainable or renewable sources; c) materials and products ensuring long life/durability and recyclability; d) materials requiring the minimum of energy and rare resources to produce and use; and e) materials requiring the least amount of energy to transport to the job site.

OUTREACH / EDUCATION:
1.

An education and outreach effort will be implemented to make the community aware of the benefits of “Green Building” practices.

2.

The City will sponsor a recognition program for innovative Green Building projects implemented in the public as well as private sector in an effort to encourage and recognize outstanding environmental protection and energy conservation projects.

IMPLEMENTATION:
The City will seek cooperation with other governmental agencies, public interest organizations, and the private sector to promote, facilitate, and implement Green Building and energy efficiency in the community.
LEGISLATION:
The City will support State and Federal legislation that promotes or allows sustainable development, conservation of natural resources, and energy efficiency technology.
REFERENCES:
Related existing Council Policies: 400-11,
Water Conservation Techniques 400-12,
Water Reclamation/Reuse 900-02, Energy
Conservation and Management 900-06,
Solid Waste Recycling
HISTORY:
Adopted by Resolution R-289457 11/18/1997, Amended by Resolution
R-295074 06/19/2001, Amended by Resolution R-298000 05/20/2003
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
132

APPENDIX L

January 2005

CRITERIA FOR PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT

DISAPPROVED EQUIPMENT

Park Planning, Park and Recreation Department

Revised 2004

Manufacturer

Component

All

Tunnels (slides or level)

All

Plexiglass or lexan bubble or window panels

All

Metal mesh roofs

All

Multiple piece spiral slide

All

Web or cargo net climbers with vinyl-coated chain, or cable-core rope

All

Vinyl-coated swing chains

Burke

Genesis line

Burke

Spiral Climber

Burke

Mirror Panel

Burke

Steering Wheel with Window

Burke

Pipe Slide

Burke

Carousel

Burke

Rock-N-Rides

Burke

Little Digger

Gametime

KidTime line

Gametime

Pentes Play line

Gametime

Expanded metal decks with vinyl coating

Gametime

Piston Panel

Gametime

RaceTime, Mini-Bus, Fire Engine and Rescue 911 panels

Gametime

Wavy Mirror Panel; Flat Mirror Panel; Flat Window Panel;
Paint Time Panel

Gametime

Bannister Rails

Gametime

Bucket Seat for swings
Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
133

APPENDIX L

January 2005

Manufacturer

Component

Gametime

Rubber spring riders

Gametime

Handi-Swing Seat and PowerScape HandiSwing

Gametime

Scrambler Whirl

Landscape Structures

Ribbon Slide

Landscape Structures

Maze Tilt Table

Landscape Structures

Permalene Spring Riders

Landscape Structures

Mirror Panel; Slant Window; Gear Panel; Ball Maze Panel

Landscape Structures

PlayOdyssey Roof

Little Tikes

Climbing Net

Little Tikes

Curved Climbing Wall

Little Tikes

Cargo Bridge

Little Tikes

Suspension Bridge

Little Tikes

Bannister Rails

Little Tikes

Mirror and Bubble Panels

Little Tikes

7-Station Play

Little Tikes

Duraglide Swing Seat

Miracle

Expanded Metal Decks with vinyl coating

Miracle

Miratherm

Miracle

Stainless Steel (multiple-section) Slide

Miracle

Clock Panel

Miracle

Mirror; Bus/Truck/Flyer Panels

Miracle

Wall with Seat

Miracle

Tot Seat #297 w/ chain

Miracle

Therapeutic Seat

Miracle

Paint Easel Panel

Miracle

Sloped Double Rail

Miracle

Pony Express, Mustang Whirl, Junior Whirl, Lifetime
Whirl, Apollo Whirl, Galaxy Whirl

Playworld Systems

Bannister Slide

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
134

APPENDIX L

January 2005

Manufacturer

Component

Playworld Systems

Clock Activity Panel

Playworld Systems

Driver Panel

Playworld Systems

Shifting Sands, Wavy Maze and Pachinko Panels

Playworld Systems

Aluminum Spiral Slide

Playworld Systems

Bubble and Look-Down Panels and Barriers

Playworld Systems

Accessible Swing Seat

Playworld Systems

Adult Rigid Swing Seat

Playworld Systems

See-saw

Playworld Systems

Reinforced Rubber Swing Seat

Playworld Systems

Modular Wood System

Playworld Systems

High Density Plastic Spring Riders

Playworld Systems

SkyTowers System

Consultants Guide to Park Design and Development - City of San Diego
135

APPENDIX M

January 2005

PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

PARK PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

JOINT USE CHECKLIST

The list below serves as a resource for the design of joint use areas. While the items included are not exhaustive, they will aid in the design of joint use areas and allow the City quicker reviews/plan checks if they are accommodated. Please note that each joint use site is different and this checklist is for reference only. Each site is unique and requirements listed may apply to some joint use sites and not to others.
The criteria below are based upon a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) dated December 31,
2002, entered into with the San Diego Unified School District. The same logic should be used, in general, for other joint use ventures as well.
1.

General Plan Standard Information
a. Joint use sites are considered similar in nature to neighborhood parks with respect to service radii. A radius of ½ mile is ideal. Joint use sites are to be for active play and, do not have to be, but are preferably for programming purposes (services
18,000-25,000 persons).

2.

Joint Use Field Size Criteria
a. The SDUSD should strive to meet our standards of 2.0 acres of turf as a standard configuration for multi-purpose play.
b. If 2.0 acres cannot be achieved, the SDUSD should strive to meet as close to 2.0 acres as possible. The City will evaluate proposed joint use sites of between 1.5 acres and 2.0 acres of turf on a case by case basis.
i. Enhanced levels of service will be credited per the MOU; however, is discouraged as a solution for acreage deficit due to current and anticipated future budget constraints.
c. Less than 1.5 acres simply does not provide the City with enough playing surface to rest the field, rotate the use of the users, etc. resulting in an unsuccessful product for the public.
i. If a minimum of 1.5 acres of turf as a standard configuration for multipurpose play cannot be achieved, then artificial turf should be provided. Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
136

APPENDIX M

January 2005

3.

Public Input Process:
a. City project manager should take joint use area project to the appropriate
Recreation Council for input.
i. The need for programmed use should be investigated.
b. When a Recreation Council does not exist, City project manager should go to the recognized Planning Group for that area.
c. Area Committee may be required if the project exceeds $1,000,000.
d. DRC is optional (recommended if you have a complicated site).
e. FARB and SCRAB are optional (recommended if you have a complicated site).
f. Park and Recreation Board are not required.

4.

Joint Use Limits/Boundaries
a.
Provide clear delineation of the joint use area on plans.
b.
The City does not generally accept the following for maintenance in a joint use agreement (JUA) unless agreed to by the Deputy Director:
1)
2:1 slopes
2)
Trees
3)
Shrub areas and associated groundcovers
4)
Planting mulch
5)
Lawn areas that exceed 5:1, are segmented from the main field area or that require hand mowing
6)
Stairs (case by case basis)
7)
Walls
8)
Retaining walls
9)
Railings
10)
Arbors/Trellis’
11)
Ball walls
12)
Enhanced paving
13)
Climbing walls
14)
Performance or stage areas/amphitheatres and associated walkways
15)
Play equipment and surfacing (case by case basis)
16)
Decomposed granite
17)
Asphalt (other than parking lots to be included in the JUA)
18)
Black top for play (case by case basis)
19)
Site furnishings, such as benches, picnic tables, bleachers, etc.
20)
Other amenities on site unless agreed to

Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
137

APPENDIX M

January 2005

5.

Restrooms
a.
Per the MOU between the City and the District, dated December 31, 2002, The
SDUSD was to provide a restroom facility for use by joint use users. The restroom can be located within the joint use field or within a School District building, as long as it’s accessible to the public after school hours and on weekends.
b.
If the SDUSD does not participate in the MOU and does not intend to provide a restroom for Prop MM projects, have them bid the project with water, sewer and electrical hook-ups. If funds can be found, the City may wish to fund a pre-fab restroom at that time or in the future.
c.
Providing an area for a portable may be acceptable. If this is an option, a concrete pad for the portable will need to be provided within 20’ of vehicular access due to cleaning access requirements. It will also need to be placed in an area compliant with ADA/Title 24 (accessible path of travel provided to the unit). The portable itself will also need to be an ADA/Title 24 model.

6.

Site Layout
a.
Maximize the flat field area as much as possible. 2 acres, minimum size for joint use areas.
1) Areas 2 acres and over will require standard maintenance procedures.
2) Areas 1.5 to 2.0 acres will require artificial turf or enhanced maintenance standards. 3) Areas less than 1.5 acres should be artificial turf or not pursued.
b.
Provide maximum 2% slope for multi-purpose joint use field areas.
c.
Provide a 12’ access gate to allow mowing equipment in and out easily from the street. d.
Provide a concrete approach to the access gate from a major street to gain access to the joint use area. This includes access for vehicles.
e.
Provide pedestrian gates (4’ wide, minimum) in joint use areas next to City parks or other open space so users can pass between one area and the other. Accessible routes should be considered where possible.
f.
Provide a 16” wide mowcurb under all new fencing where fencing is adjacent to the turfed joint use field area. Mowcurbs with no fencing within the joint use area should be 8” wide. See SDRSD L-3.

7.

Materials
a.
Provide concrete walks within the joint use area. Asphalt and decomposed granite are not acceptable.

8.

Hard Court Areas
a.
Provide concrete hard court areas, if included in the joint use area. Asphalt is not preferred and will only be accepted on a case by case basis by Deputy Director.
Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
138

APPENDIX M

January 2005

9.

Parking
a.
Per the MOU between the District and the City, dated December 31, 2002, inclusion of parking lots in joint use agreements is evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on off-street parking availability and recreational programs proposed for the site.
b.
If parking is included in the Joint Use area, provide ADA/Title 24 access from the joint use parking lot to the joint use field area.

10.

Site Amenities
a.
Provide a free standing drinking fountain (ADA/Title 24 compliant), accessible by those using the joint use fields during non-school hours and on weekends, if one is not accessible on the school buildings.
b.
Reconfigure fencing in the joint use area to allow for access to school drinking fountains, if possible.

11.

Planting (When Negotiated)
a.
Utilize the City of San Diego Regional Standard Drawings for the joint use field details. b.
Provide bubblers and a 2’ radius of no turf around any trees in the joint use area. .
For all trees installed in lawn areas provide a non-lawn area, 2’ radius from the baseline of each tree trunk to the edge of the lawn area. The 2’ non-lawn radius around the tree trunk shall have a 2” layer of mulch to prevent weed growth, there shall be no mulch on crown of tree.. All bubblers shall be on a separate remote control valve, two (2) per tree.
c.
Provide hydroseed mix ‘2A’ per the Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and
Development for the joint use area.
d.
Provide a simple plant palette, with only a few species that will be easy to maintain. e.
Any negotiated tree planting in the joint use area will need to be guaranteed and maintained by the District for 3 years. Trees must be healthy and established at time of turn-over to City for maintenance.
f.
No slopes shall be included in the joint use area. City will not maintain slopes surrounding the joint use site (neither irrigation nor planting on slopes).

12.

Irrigation
a.
Utilize the City of San Diego Regional Standard Drawings and Green Book for the joint use field details.
b.
Utilize the Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and Development for the joint use field irrigation equipment legend, as all the equipment must be on the approved irrigation materials list.
Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
139

APPENDIX M
c.

d.

e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.

m.
n.
o.
p.

13.

Soil
a.

January 2005

Provide quick couplers with globe valves at a maximum distance of 150 feet on center for the field area. See the Consultant’s Guide to Park Design and
Development.
Provide a separate water meter and controller for the joint use area, separate from the school’s system. The electricity for the controller is usually supplied by the
District. Ensure that this is accommodated on plans.
Locate controller in joint use area in an easily accessible location within the joint use area, but outside of the irrigation spray zone.
Provide a high flow shut-off assembly in the controller area.
Install mainlines at 21” depth and laterals at 15” depth in the joint use area.
Utilize globe valves, not gate valves. Install globe valves per SDRSD I-13 with alternate pipe sleeve installation.
The backflow preventer will require a stainless steel enclosure free of burrs and sharp edges on a concrete pad. Reference SDRSD W-27 and W-28.
Irrigation boxes shall be concrete with a hinged cast iron locking top.
Ensure two spare wires are run for irrigation, minimum.
Provide a receptacle and plug for the controller in the enclosure box so controller can be unplugged to work on it if required. Or, provide an electrical breaker for the controller. Either must be accessible to City staff during evening and weekend hours so the controller can be shut off if required.
Ensure that all change in directions for mainline in the joint use area utilize an isolation valve.
Complete irrigation and planting sheets for construction documents and for as­ builts separately from District sheets for clarity.
Provide 6” high pop-ups in the joint use area where possible pending manufacturer, stainless steel if available.
The system must be able to apply the volume of water necessary to achieve the evapotranspiration rate (ETO) of the highest demand month within the following criteria: 4 days per week, 8 hour irrigation window, 10 pm – 6 am. This may mean that the system may need to be sized to accommodate 2 valves running at once.

Per the Consultant’s Guide, the field shall be free of all ½” diameter or larger rock to a depth of 15”. This can be achieved by two means:
• The field can be provided with a 15” layer of Class ‘A’ topsoil free of rocks; or
• The field can be grated free of the rocks for the top 15” and the soil amended for the top 15“as approved.

Note on plans how this will be achieved.

Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
140

APPENDIX M

January 2005

14.

Accessibility
a.
If a new parking lot is included, provide wheel chair path of travel from the parking lot to the joint use area.
b.
In all cases, an accessible route from the adjacent public right of way or public transportation stop to the joint use area is required.
c.
Be sure to consider the school fencing plan and coordinate which ones are open in off school hours and on joint use hours.
d.
Improvements must be consistent with the requirements of state and federal law for disabled access, including the California Government Code section 4450, et. seq. the California Building Code in the California Code of Regulations at Title 24, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act
Accessibility Guidelines.

15.

Miscellaneous
a.
The Consultant’s Guide lists inspection stages and team members for the joint use area. Ensure these are included on the plans for the joint use area. City staff must be present numerous times during construction to ensure compliance with our standards. b.
Add City of San Diego supplemental irrigation specs. to the plans (Appendix ‘F’ of the Consultant’s Guide).

16.

Not Allowed in Joint Use Facilities
a.
Off leash dogs.
b.
Alcohol use.

Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego
141

APPENDIX N

January 2005
The Appendix contains: Access Memo 2004-01,
Access Memo2004-02,
Access Memo 2004-03,
Access Memo 2004-04.

The referenced Memos contain City of San Diego Standard Drawings and other
References to Accessibility Standards. The user of this Guide is aware that the most recent approved Drawings and/or Standards shall apply.

The following drawings are part of Access Memo 2004-03:
SDG – 130 Truncated Dome Detail
SDG – 132 Curb Ramps Type A & B
SDG – 133 Curb Ramp Type A-1 & B-1
SDG – 134 Curb Ramp Type C
SDG – 136 Curb Ramp Type D
SDG – 137 General Notes for Curb Ramps

We have put in a reference to their location (City of San Diego Standard Drawings
Document No. AEC701042).
There is a link to this document on the City Web Site: http://www.sandiego.gov/engineering-cip/services/consultcontract/edocref/standarddraw.shtml Follow this link to General Surface Improvements Chapter.
Consultant shall confer with City of San Diego Project Manager prior to implementation. Consultants Guide to Park Design & Development – City of San Diego

142

ACCESS MEMO NO.

2004-01
CITY OF SAN DIEGO

ME MOR AN DUM

DATE:

February 19, 2004

TO:

City Departments and City Facility Managers

FROM:

Frank Belock, City Engineer
Tina Christiansen, Development Services Director
Linda Woodbury, Disability Services Coordinator

SUBJECT:

Accessibility Design Standards for City Owned or Leased FaciLities

The City is committed to having its buildings accessible to all individuals. This memorandum sets forth the City's first set of recommendations to be used for the new construction and alterations ofCity owned or leased facilities. It should be used by all City departments and incorporated in all City contracts for new construction, alteration, and addition projects in any
City-owned or leased facilities.
As part ofthe Ci~'s ongoing efforts to ensure compliance with the State and Federal

accessibility laws , a technical group of City staff, known as the City's Access Law Technical
Group (Technical Group), has been formed to review areas of conflict or confusion and recommend policies. Wben a recommendation, such as those listed here, is specified, it is to be followed in new construction, alterations, and additions, unless the Deputy Director and the
Technical Group determine that to follow such a recommendation is impracticable either structurally or economically.
A reference to a specific code section is a reminder of current legal requirements, whereas a recommendation sets forth a goal wbich exceeds minimum legal requirements. The recommendations set forth here are in bold.

I.

Sanitary Facilities- (Multiple Accommodations, Single-Occupancy Toilets and Family
Stalls):

l.

General:
All sanitary facilities shall be designed per the most current accessibility

' ..,. lif-

""""'coo. (COC)""'......,. wi• "'"""'"' Aa

(ADA),

mi~~ RIGINAL

Departments and City Facility Managers

5,2004

2 regulations of the CBC and the ADA/ADAAG adopted at the time ofsubmittal for a building permit review.
2.

Urinals:
Grab bars are recommended on each side ofurinals (please see attached diagram).
Where urinals are provided, install at least one accessible urinal with a 24" long
(min.) and 1W' diameter grab bar vertically placed on each side of the fixture.
The top ofthe grab bars shall not exceed 48'' as measured from the finish floor
(based on maximum forward reach height requirement per C8C 11188.5 and
ADAAG 4.2.5). An accessible urinal shall have a clear floor space of30" by 48'' in front of the fixture to allow a forward approach (C8C Ill8 .9.4 and ADAAG
4.22.5). All grab bars shall comply with C8C IIISB.S and ADAAG 426.

3.

Accessible Stalls within Multiple Accommodation Restroorns:
a.

Provide the International Symbol of Accessibility (ISA) on the center ofa stall/partition door mounted at 5'-0" max. from the finish floor to the centerline of the sign (height per CBC 1117B.5.7 and ADAAG 4.30.6).
The !SA shall consist ofa white figure on a blue background. The blue shall be equal to Color No. 15090 in federal Standard 595b (CBC lll7B.5.8.1.1) b.

Install a "Loop Handle" on the inside and outside ofa stall/compartment door immediately below the latch. The latch should be a flip-over style, sliding, or other hardware not requiring the user to grasp or twist. Center the opening hardware approximately between 30" and 44" above the finish floor(CBC I 1338.2.5.2 and ADAAG 4.13.9).
The "Loop Handle" is recommended over a "U-Sbaped Handle", but either is allowed per CBC ll15B.7.1.4 and ADAAG 4.13.9.

4.

Single-Accommodation and Family Unit Restroorns:
a.

General- For single user portable toilet or bathing units clustered at a single location, at least 5% but no less than one accessible toilet unit or bathing unit shall be installed at each cluster whenever typical inaccessible units are provided. Accessible units shall be identified by the International
Symbol of Accessibility. ADAAG 4.1.2(6)

b.

A 3' 0" wide and 7'0" high door is recommended. Although a clear width of32" minimwn door width is allowed by CBC 11338.2.2 and
ADAAG 4.13.5, we recommend installing a minimum 3'0" wide and 7'0" high entry door (C8C 11338.2.2). The effort to operate the door shall be

ORIGINAL

IIYW ~

f8

-City Departments and City Facility Managers
Ianuary 5, 2004

Page3

) within the allowed 5-pound pressure (CBC ll33B.2.5 and ADAAG
4.13.11(2)) with a privacy latch (push button-lever release)(ADAAG
4.1.6(e)).
IT.

Library Facilities, Recreation Centers, and Senior Centers (including facilities where

there is a high usage by senior citizens and/or persons with disabilities) are

recommended to install power-assisted doors when they are constructed.

I.

General:
Construction ofall facilities (new construction, alteration, and addition) shall be designed per the most current accessibility regulations of the CBC and the
ADNADAAG adopted at the time of the submittal for a building permit review.

2.

Doors:
Power-assisted doors are recommended for the main entry. Construct all facilities
(new construction, alteration, and addition) with at least one power-assisted door(s) at the main entry. All new doors must comply with the most current accessibility regulations of the CBC and the ADNADAAG adopted at the time of the submittal for a building permit review.

These recommendations are specific to urinal grab bars, accessible toilet compartment doors, and power-assisted doors. The overall design is required to comply with the ADNADAAG, the
CBC, and other governing laws and regulations adopted at the time of the submittal for a building permit review.

F~
City Engineer

~'M
T~ Christiansen

Development Services Director

-~,·f~~
Linda Woodbury
Disability Services Coordinator

I ORIGINAL I

ACCESS .MEMO NO.

2004-02
CITY OF SAN DIEGO

MEMORA NDUM
DATE:

October l 4, 2004

TO:

City Departme11ts and City Facility Maoagers

FROM:

Patti Boekamp, Engineering and Capital ProjectS Acting Director
Gruy Halbert, Development Services Acting Director

Linda Woodbury, Disability Services Coordinator

SUBJECT:

Forward ;md Side Reach Range LimitS Standards fi>r City Owned and Leased Facilities

This memorandum sets forth the City's recommendations to be used in the new construction, alteration, and/or addition of City owned or leased facilities and public way. These recommendations should be incorporate{]. in all City comracts for new construction, alteration, and addition projects.
As part ofthe City's ongoing efforts to ensure compliance with the State and f'ederal accessibility
1
laws , the City's Access Law Technical Group 2 is releasing this memorandum of recommendations on forward and side reach range limits Standards that shall be applied to all buildi~…...

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