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Plato's Apology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By criscavazos27
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I believe the argument that Socrates made: “Wicked people have a bad effect upon those with whom they are in the closest contact” is valid, because you can become like someone who you are really close to, for example if you hang out a lot with your best friend, it is more likely that you became intentionally influenced by him/her, this might be in a good or bad way it varies and depends in the person. So if you are surrounded by wicked people you probably might end up being just like them but this is not always the case, some people have a very strong mind and personality that they stick with their personality no matter what.

The way I would apply this argument is by surrounding myself with people who bring the best of me and with people who encourage me to become a better person. And little by little staying away from wicked people who can affect me in the future. Even though we are in times that it is difficult to find people with good intentions we have to be very careful and choose the right people, so we won’t end up quitting our personality just for them or because of them.

In another hand, I personally believe that Socrates did not intended to have a bad influence on his close companions, he actually was trying to prove a point by saying the truth. (“All I know is that I know nothing”), but most people did not like to hear what he had to say, people didn’t like to hear the fact that they were wrong and that they didn’t knew anything. That’s is why most people started hating Socrates.

As humans we need to admit that we will never know everything, and if we think we do, we would be ignorant. I really like what Socrates states by saying: “I am the wisest man alive, for I know one thing, and that is that I know nothing.” This quote really inspires me.…...

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