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Religious Education Sba

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MY PROJECT ON JUDAISM FESTIVAL

NAME: SANATEA BRYCE AND KHIMARELY WHITE
SCHOOL: CAMPERDOWN HIGH SCHOOL
TITLE:JUDAISM FESTIVALS
SUBJECT: RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
TEACHER’S NAME: MRS TREASURE- SMITH

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First of all I would like to thank god my creator who has given me the knowledge to understand this project that
My religious education teacher Mrs Treasure smith has given to me,
I also thank Aunty Donna for putting a little effort in helping me
With this project.

Once again a big thank you all……………………………………………………!!

INTRODUCTION
This project is base on Judaism festivals or festivals in Judaism. it plays a very important role in our life because it helps you to know more about religious education. Many children nowadays take religious education for granted the important of other religions and our religion which is Christianity. Without thinking about how important it would be to know about other religions and ower own religion. Understanding how ower religion and other religions operate, the good ideas that lies behind reading and knowing more about what happening in different part of the world and what type of rules do some Caribbean places followed by like for example India which is where you can go and find Hinduism let their young ones married at an early age but like we Jamaica ower children start that at the latest 18 years of age. This is what religious education set for us to learn.

TABLE OF CONTENT

ROSH HASHANAH……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5
ROSH HASHANAH PICTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..6
ROSH HASHANAH RITUALS........................................................................................................................................7.................................9
YOM KIPPUR………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…10
YOM KIPPUR PICTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..11
YOM KIPPUR RITUALS.................................................................................................................................................12............................14
PESACH…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..15
PESACH PICTURE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….16
PESACH RITUALS.......................................................................................................................................................................17...................18
SHAVUOTH………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………19
SHAVOUTH PICTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
SHOVUOTH RITUALS...........................................................................................................................................21........................................22
SIMCHAT TORAH…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….23
SIMCHAT TORAH PICTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...24
SIMCHAT TORAH RITUALS...............................................................................................................................25........................................27
PURIM……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………....28
PURIM PICTURE…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….....29
PURIM RITUALS.............................................................................................................................................30..................................................31
CHANUKAH..........................................................................................................................................................................................................32
CHANUKAH PICTURE.....................................................................................................................................................................................33
CHANUKAH RITUALS.................................................................................................................................34...............................................36
BIBLIOGRAPHY...................................................................................................................................................................................................37
COMMENT AND GRADE PAGE ................................................................................................................................................................38

Rosh Hashanah {Jewish New Year}
Rosh Hashanah is a Jewish holiday commonly referred to as the "Jewish New Year." It is observed on the first day of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. The festival lasts for two days.
Rosh Hashanah is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim nor aim ("Days of Awe"), or Asseret Yemei Teshuva (The Ten Days of Repentance) which are days specifically set aside to focus on repentance that conclude with the holiday of Yom Kippur. The story of Rosh Hashanah is about Abraham and his belief in God when he was told to sacrifice his son.

ROSH HASHANAH PICTURE

ROSH HASHANAH RITUALS

Rosh Hashanah rituals are: * Lighting candles
On the first night, candles should be lit no later than 18 minutes before sundown. On the second night, candles should be lit immediately after nightfall, kindled by an existing flame. Then they would pray; these are the words they would pray to Yahweh: Blessed are you, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe | Who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us | light the candles of [Shabbat and of] the holiday (Amen) * evening KiddushKiddush is recited while holding a cup of wine or other liquid, no less than 3.3 ounces. If wine or grape juice is not used, you should substitute by whose all things will come to create the fruit of the vine. Then they’ll pray this prayer: Blessed are you, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe | (if using wine or grape juice)
Who creates the fruit of the vine (Amen) | (if using other liquids)who made all things exist through His word (Amen) | Blessed are you, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe | who has chosen us from among all people, and exalted us above every tongue | and sanctified us with His commandments, and you gave us, Lord our God, with love | with love this day of [Sabbath and this day of] | remembrance, a day of [remembrance of] shofar blowing [with love] | love a holy convocation, a memorial of the exodus from Egypt | Indeed, You have chosen us and made us holy from all peoples | And Your word is true and established for ever. | Blessed are You, Lord, our God, King over all the world, | Who sanctifies [the Sabbath] and Israel and the Day of Remembrance. (Amen) * ShehecheyanuThey’ll then sing a song a little song: Blessed are you, Lord, our God, sovereign of the universe | who has kept us alive, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this season (Amen) | * Apples and Honeyduring Rosh Hashanah, it is traditional to eat apples dipped in honey, to symbolize our hopes for a "sweet" new year. The apple is dipped in honey, the blessing for eating tree fruits is recited, the apple is tasted, and then the apples and honey prayer is recited. They’ll recited a prayer: Blessed are you, Lord, our God, king of the universe | Who creates the fruit of the tree. (Amen) | Take a bite from the apple dipped in honey, then continue with the following: | May it be Your will, Lord our God and God of our ancestors | that you renew for us a good and sweet year. | | |

Yom Kippur {Day of Atonement}
Yom Kippur is a Jewish festival. It is also known as the Day of Atonement. It lasts 25 hours. During this period, Jews ask God to forgive them for all their sins. People fast on this day, and they have to go to synagogue. Other things people are not allowed to do during Yom Kippur include washing, using perfumes or lotions, and having any kind of sexual intercourse.
Many wear white as a symbol of purity.
Yom Kippur is the tenth day of the month of Tishrei in the Hebrew calendar. In Jewish tradition, God writes the fate of each person for the coming year into a "book" on Rosh Hashanah. God waits until Yom Kippur to "seal" the fate. During the Days of Awe, a Jew tries to amend his or her behaviour. They will also seek forgiveness for wrongs done against Go and wrongs done against other human beings. The evening and day of Yom Kippur are used for public and private confessions of guilt. At the end of Yom Kippur, a Jew considers themselves absolved by God.
The Yom Kippur prayer service includes several special parts. One of them is the number of prayer services. A regular day has three prayer services (Ma'ariv, the evening prayer; Shacharit, the Morning Prayer; and Mincha, the afternoon prayer). A Shabbat or Yom Tov has four prayer services (Ma'ariv; Shachari

YOM KIPPUR PICTURE

Yom Kippur rituals
Yom Kippur rituals are:

* Wearing White
Traditionally, many Jews wear white on Yom Kippur. Because white is a symbol of purity and Yom Kippur is a day when we undertake a spiritual cleansing, it is an appropriate color for the occasion. Others interpret white as representative of the white shroud in which Jews are buried, symbolizing our mortality and reminding us of the need for humility and repentance. * Shofar
Yom Kippur ends with a single, long blast of the shofar. The stirring sound of the shofar at the conclusion of the holiday has many different explanations. One is that the practice recalls the giving of the Torah at Sinai (when the shofar also was blown). Another is that the shofar signals the triumph of Israel over its sins for another year and heralds the possible coming of the messianic age. * In the Congregation
The heart of the Yom Kippur experience is congregational worship. It is a mitzvah to attend all the services on Yom Kippur, from Kol Nidre in the evening, throughout the next day, ending with N’ilah (concluding services) and the sounding of the shofar. A memorial service (Yizkor) is included on Yom Kippur, and Havdalah (a service of separation) is recited at the end of the day, following the sounding of the shofar. A joyous “break-the-fast” meal is served at the conclusion of services, either at the congregation or at home.
The Erev Yom Kippur service is called Kol Nidre, meaning “all vows,” and refers to the special liturgical formulation chanted by Jews solely on Yom Kippur. It is a legal formula for the annulment of vows, which dates back many centuries. The practice of reciting Kol Nidre probably began in about the 9th century C.E. Recited in a mix of Hebrew and Aramaic, the vernacular language of the time, Kol Nidre cancels and annuls all unintended vows made during the previous year. Traditionally, Kol Nidre is chanted three times, though only once in some Reform congregations. In many settings, the haunting melody is played on a violin, viola or cello. The threefold repetition most likely derives from the ancient practice of reciting all official proclamations three times. (Syme 25) During the chanting of Kol Nidre, the Torah scrolls are held by leaders of the community as the congregation stands together in silence.
Traditionally, in addition to Erev Yom Kippur, the entirety of the next day is spent in synagogue. The liturgy for the day of Yom Kippur includes powerful readings from the Torah, the core of Jewish teaching and practice, andYizkor, a memorial service to remember our loved ones who have died and, perhaps, to draw from their memories the inspiration to be the best of what we can yet be.
The Days of Awe are about more than confessing our sins. They are an opportunity to envision our lives and our communities if we each become a little more caring with each passing year. On Yom Kippur morning, we read from the Torah portion entitled Nitzavim, in which we learn that meaningful Jewish lives are not too hard for us and not too far away—if we are willing to choose a life of caring for each other. We also recite the Al Cheit, a prayer that recounts our sins: gossip, arrogance, exploiting the weak, and all the other missteps we took during the year just ended. The High Holidays are a time for t’shuvah, which is usually understood to mean repentance. But t’shuvah is much more than repentance. Its literal meaning is return and, indeed, t’shuvah is a return forward to something holy inside us that hasn’t yet reached fruition, a return to the goodness and the caring that could have been and still can be. T’shuvah is our search to find the potential for good and for holiness that has been within us all along but somehow became hidden in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. * At Home
Beginning at sundown prior to Kol Nidre, it is customary to render ourselves less comfortable through a variety of means, including fasting. Therefore, a family meal, known as se’udah mafseket (the concluding meal before the fast) traditionally is eaten before sundown, with the candle lighting happening at the end of the meal. This process is a way to mark the entree of Yom Kippur into the home and, with that blessing, the fast begins.
Tradition holds that acts of tzedakah are key components to our observance of Yom Kippur. In many synagogues, a fundraising appeal coincides with the High Holidays. Many Jews make tzedakah a part of their Shabbat ritual, depositing a few dollars in a tzedakah box prior to the beginning of Shabbat. This can also be done as part of the ritual prior to the meal eaten before Kol Nidre. To make this even more special, the Days of Awe can be a time to tally the funds set aside each week during the prior year and determine to which causes they will be donated.
By reciting prayers in a synagogue on Yom Kippur we atone for transgressions against God. For wrongs committed against other people, it has become customary to seek out friends and relatives whom we have wronged during the year and to ask their forgiveness before Yom Kippur begins. The holiday is a time when families should be at peace, and gives us a yearly opportunity to put aside past hurts and create a new beginning.
It also is customary on Yom Kippur to perpetuate the memory of loved ones. To do so, many Jews visit the cemetery the day before Yom Kippur and kindle 24-hour yahrzeit candles in memory loved ones who have died (learn more about yahrzeit candles and other Jewish mourning rituals). Yahrzeit candles are lit prior to the lighting of the holiday candles. During the Middle Ages, this custom was seen as a means of atonement for the dead. Today, however, it is a beautiful expression of tribute and remembrance.

Pesach {Passover}

Northern Hemisphere Passover takes place in spring as the Torah prescribes Passover or Pesach is an important Biblically-derived Jewish festival. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation over 3,300 years ago by God from slavery in ancient Egypt that ruled by the Pharaohs, and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt.
Passover commences on the 15th of the Hebrew month of Nisan and lasts for either seven days (in Israel) or eight days (in the diaspora). In Judaism, a day commences at dusk and lasts until the following dusk, thus the first day of Passover only begins after dusk of the 14th of Nisan and ends at dusk of the 15th day of the month of Nisan. The rituals unique to the Passover celebrations commence with the Passover Seder when the 15th of Nisan has begun. In the it: "in the month of [the] spring.

PESACH PICTURE

PESACH RITUALS

* Pesach Preparation
Pesach festival involves lot of preparation and groundwork. Pesach preparation begins day after Purim, which occurs a month before Pesach festival. According to the commandants in the torah, Jews are forbidden to eat chametz. Chametz is made of the five grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oats, and spelt. Jewish women decorate their home by painting the wall and ceiling of the house. * Bedikat Chametz
This is an important ritual of searching for chametz. The house is cleaned, but you have to still search for chametz. So people put ten pieces of chametz around the house. The family members search for the pieces. Customarily this is done with a candle in the darkened room, using a feather or a spoon to brush the chametz. Children have a lot of fun doing this. This is a commandment, so a prayer is said before doing so. A complete silence is maintained until the last piece is found. Then another prayer is said to eliminate all chametz that one is unaware of. * Pesach Lamb
In Jewish tradition, the father of the house buys a customary lamb few weeks before Pesach festival. The Rabbi or butcher is brought to the house to slaughter the lamb outside of the house. It has been a custom to offer the butcher a piece of meat along with some money. * Pesach Seder Meal
The Seder meal is a ritual feast taken during Pesach fest and forms a very significant part of Pesach festival. The Seder meal is taken on first and second Pesach night. Family members and friends gather for festive supper meal to mark the beginning of the weeklong Pesach festival. They recite prayers over the wine and drink the first cup. A drop of wine is spilled during the reading of the ten plagues to symbolize the suffering and sadness related with the freedom of the Israelis. They dip karpas, or vegetables, in salt water and eat them. The salt water symbolizes the tears of the Israelis. Bitter herbs such as horseradish symbolize the bitterness of slavery, and vegetables are dipped in salt water to recall the tears of the slaves. A bone of lamb represents the sacrifices that were once performed at the historical Jewish Temple, while a boiled egg is eaten to symbolize Jewish faith under the heat of Egyptian oppression. * The Matzah
The middle of the matzah is broken into pieces and placed on the Seder table. Half of that matzah will become the Afikoman, the payment that will occur after the meal. The story of Passover is recited, and the youngest child is asked to chant the Four Questions. The retelling of the stories is followed with the second glass of wine. The matzah is blessed and it is tasted without any other flavors. Bitter herbs are taken with a bite of matzah. Charoset is added which is a mixture of apples, nuts, and wine--to create a Hillel sandwich. The holiday meal is served with deserts. The Afikoman is removed from the children present by giving them the gift and is shared with each guest present. After the Afikoman has been eaten, no other food should be consumed. The blessings are recited and everyone drinks the fourth cup of wine and concludes the Seder with traditional Passover songs.

The Pesach festival is being celebrated with much fun-fare, religious fervor and gaiety.

Shavuot {feast of the week}

Shavuot commemorates the anniversary of the day God gave the Torah to the entire nation of Israel assembled at Mount Sinai, although the association between the giving of the Torah (Matan Torah) and Shavuot is not explicit in the Biblical text. The holiday is one of the Shalosh Regalim, the three Biblical pilgrimage festivals. It marks the conclusion of the Counting of the Omer, and its date is directly linked to that of Passover. The Torah mandates the seven-week Counting of the Omer, beginning on the second day of Passover, to be immediately followed by Shavuot. This counting of days and weeks is understood to express anticipation and desire for the giving of the Torah. On Passover, the people of Israel were freed from their enslavement to Pharaoh; on Shavuot they were given the Torah and became a nation committed to serving God. The word Shavuot means weeks and the festival of Shavuot marks the completion of the seven-week counting period between Passover and Shavuot.
Shavuot is one of the lesser-known Jewish holidays among secular Jews in the Jewish diaspora, while those in Israel are more aware of it. According to Jewish law, Shavuot is celebrated in Israel for one day and in the Diaspora (outside of Israel) for two days. Reform Judaism celebrates only one day, even in the Diaspora.

SHAVUOTH PICTURE

SHAVUOT RITUALS

* In the Congregation
Traditionally, the Book of Ruth, part of the section of the Bible known as Writings, is read during services on Shavuot. Ruth is a young Moabite woman who married an Israelite man. When her husband died, she followed her mother-in-law, Naomi, back to Israel and adopted the Jewish faith and people as her own. To feed herself and Naomi, she gleaned in the field of Boaz, a rich man. Boaz is taken with her, and eventually they marry. Among their descendents is the famed King David who built the first Temple.
The theme of Ruth’s conversion to Judaism is central to this story. In Ruth 1:16–17, she states: “Entreat me not to leave you or to return from following after you. For wherever you go, I will go. Wherever you lodge, I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God. Where you die, I will die, and there will I be buried. Thus and more may God do to me if anything but death parts me from you.” Ruth is often considered to be the archetype of all who “choose” or convert to Judaism—accepting the Torah, just as Jews accepted the Torah at Mt. Sinai—and this passage traditionally has been understood as her conversion statement.
The ceremony of Confirmation—for high school students who have continued their studies and Jewish involvement beyond b’nei mitzvah—often is held on or near Shavuot. Just as the Jewish people accepted the Torah on Shavuot, so do confirmands reaffirm their commitment to the covenant and adult Jewish life.

* At Home
It is customary to decorate ones home with greens and fresh flowers on Shavuot as a reminder of the spring harvest and the ancient ritual of bringing the first fruits to the Temple. Many Jews prepare and eat dairy foods—often cheesecake or blintzes—on Shavuot as a reminder of the sweetness of Torah. Often families gather together on the holiday to enjoy a meal that features such dishes.
Shavuot: Preparing for the Holiday
The Bible teaches that the Israelites had three days to prepare to receive the Torah at Mount Sinai. To ready themselves for the momentous occasion, they were instructed to wash their clothes and to stay ritually pure. By recalling those three days, Jews today can use the three days before Shavuot to prepare personally, as a family, and as a community to re-experience this life-changing event.

SIMCHAT TORAH

Simchat Torah or better Simḥath “Rejoicing of/[with the] Torah" is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simhat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkoth in the month of Tishrei (occurring in mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar).
The main celebration of Simhat Torah takes place in the synagogue during evening and morning services. In Orthodox as well as many Conservativecongregations, this is the only time of year on which the Torah scrolls are taken out of the ark and read at night. In the morning, the last parashah of Deuteronomy and the first parashah of Genesis are read in the synagogue. On each occasion, when the ark is opened, the worshippers leave their seats to dance and sing with the Torah scrolls in a joyous celebration that can last for several hours.

| |

SIMCHAT TORAH

Sim hat torah rituals * Ki Tissa
The parashah is the longest of the weekly Torah portions in the book ... for Modern Times: When is a tent just a tent and not like a bed or a hat? .. * .Beshalach is the sixteenth weekly Torah portion (פָּרָשָׁה, parashah) in the annual Jewish ...Times: When is a tent just a tent and not like a bed or a hat? ... is the 22nd weekly Torah portion (פָּרָשָׁה, parashah) in the annual Jewish ... Times: When is a tent just a tent and not like a bed or a hat? ...

* Kedoshim
In the parashah) is the 30th weekly Torah portion (פָּרָשָׁה, parashah) in the ... HE for Kohanim not to become ritually impure for the dead ... * Jewish prayer
Scroll is taken out of the Ark in a ritual much longer than the ritual ... the services for removing the Torah from and replacing it to the Ark... * Death
The rituals connected to and powers ascribed to San La Muerte are ... However, the currently controlled Sim can play Rock, Paper, Scissors ...
The Torah commands that Israelites wear tassels or fringes (ẓiẓit ... After that time, male athletes participated in ritualized athletic ...

PURIM {DELIEVERANCE}
Purim is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire where a plot had been formed to destroy them. The story is recorded in the Biblical Book of According to the Book of Esther, Haman, royal vizier to King Ahasuerus planned to kill all the Jews in the empire, but his plans were foiled by Mordecai and his cousin and adopted daughter Esther who had risen to become Queen of Persia. The day of deliverance became a day of feasting and rejoicing.
Based on the conclusions of the Scroll of Esther that they should make them days of feasting and gladness, and of sending portions one to another, and gifts to the poor" Purim is therefore celebrated among Jews by:
1. Exchanging reciprocal gifts of food and drink known as mishloach manot.
2. Donating charity to the poor known as mattanot la-evyonim.
3. Eating a celebratory meal known as a se'udat Purim.
4. Public recitation ("reading of the megillah") of the Scroll of Esther, known as kriat ha-megillah, usually in synagogue.
5. Reciting additions, known as Al hanissim, to the daily prayers and the grace after meals.
6. Other customs include drinking wine or any alcoholic beverage, wearing of masks and costumes, are celebrated in public .Purim is celebrated annually according to the Hebrew calendar on the 14th day of the Hebrew month Adar

PURIM PICTURE

Purim rituals
Purim rituals are: * Judaism and violence (section Purim and the Book of Esther)
Evidence for Jewish violence on Purim through the centuries is " ... title Essential Judaism: a complete guide to beliefs, customs and rituals ... * Burning of Judas
The burning of Judas is an Easter -time ritual in many Orthodox and Catholic ...generalize these type of activities as "scapegoating rituals". ... * m Purim basket) and also called a Purim basket, are gifts of food or drink that are ... Category:PurimCategory:Jewish law and rituals Category: Jewish cuisine ... * Jewish cuisine [section Purim)
Purim ... The Tanakh describes circumstances in which a person who is tahor orritually pure may become tamei or ritually impure. ... * Great Assembly
Feast of Purim ; and the institution of the prayer known as the "Shemoneh 'Esreh " as well as the synagogal prayers, rituals, and benedictions. ... * Shabbat (section Rituals)
Rituals Welcoming Sabbath ... Shabbat haGadol (Shabbat preceding Pesach ), Shabbat Zachor (Shabbat preceding Purim ), and Shabbat Teshuva ...

* Jewish holidays (section Purim Katan)
The fundamental rituals and observances of Shabbat include: Reading of the Weekly Torah portion requests for ... Purim and Shushan Purim: Purim ... * Jewish holiday[section Purim katan] dairy may not be combined, and meat must be ritually slaughtered and salt ed to remove all traces of blood. ... Purim * Yom Tov Torah readings (section Purim
Purim ... ceremony of the red heifer , whose ashes were combined with water toritually purify anyone who had been in contact with a dead person. ...

* Timeline of antisemitism
415: Jews are accused of ritual murder during Purim Christians in ... that Jews do not harm Christian children or require blood for any rituals. ...

Chanukah {festival of lights
Chanukah also known as the Festival of Lights, Feast of Dedication, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire of the 2nd century BCE. Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar.
The festival is observed by the kindling of the lights of a unique candelabrum, the nine-branched menorah or chanukiah, one additional light on each night of the holiday, progressing to eight on the final night. The typical menorah consists of eight branches with an additional raised branch. The extra light is called a shamash: and is given a distinct location, usually above or below the rest. The purpose of the shamash is to have a light available for practical use, as using the Hanukkah lights themselves for purposes other than publicizing and meditating upon Hanukkah is forbidde

CHANUKAH PICTURE

Chanukah rituals
Chanukah rituals are: * Hanukkah (redirect from Chanukah rituals) a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah or Chanukkah), also known as the Festival of Lights, ... Hanukkah rituals: File:Donetsk hanuka. ... * Oil lamp (section Chanukah)
Particular ambience they produce, or in rituals and religious ceremonies. ...Chanukah : forms the centre of the Chanukah story and centers on ... * Jewish cuisine (section Chanukah)
Must be ritually slaughtered and salt ed to remove all traces of blood. ... Chanukah: It is customary to eat foods fried in oil to celebrate... * Yom Tov Torah readings (section Chanukah)
Chanukah ... ceremony of the red heifer , whose ashes were combined with water toritually purify anyone who had been in contact with a dead person. ... * Judaism in Rugrats animations in its attention to Jewish ritual and tradition "A Rugrats ... "A RugratsChanukah" number 5 in their 1999 "10 Best Classic Family ... * David Heinz Gumbel
Simultaneously, he produced Jewish ritual objects like a Chanukah menorah or candlesticks. Gumbel utilized polished silver and other ... * Menorah (Temple) (section Hanukkah (Chanukah) )
Hanukkah (Chanukah) ... Category: Jewish ritual objects Category:Tabernacle and Jerusalem Temples Category:Hebrew words and phrases Category: ... * Mitzvah tank are willing to perform religious rituals, such as the putting on of ... In addition, during the holiday of Chanukah many Menorahs with ... BIBLIOGRAPHY

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...Rastafari. The largest Rasta village was named the Pinnacle community during Howell leadership. However seventy (70) Rasta’s were arrested and so faith was lost in Howell. Because he mostly wears suit and he didn’t have a beard or locks they believed that Howell wasn’t one of them of them and so Leonard Howell went on his own. Bibliography Campbell C, and Miles M (2005) The New Integrated Religious Education Workbook 5 Appendix Name: Roxanne Williams Candidate #: 100070 Examination Body: CSEC Subject: Religious Education School Code: 100070 Year of Examination: 2013 Territory: Jamaica |...

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... Research Question:to what extent is it true to say that the Castro revolution of the 20th century was responsible for the trade being relinquished between Cuba and the US? Rationale: I choose to do this topic as I am deeply intrigued as to what really were the challenges faced by the United States to relinquish the trade between itself and Cuba during the cuban revolution of the 20th century.I hope that this study will be beneficial to readers who will endevour to do this topic or to those individuals who just want futher readings on what actually led to the relationship between Cuba and the United States being destroyed. Introduction: In July 1953, Castro led about 120 men in an attack on the Moncada army barracks in Santiago de Cuba. The assault failed, Castro was captured and sentenced to 15 years in prison, and many of his men were killed. The U.S.-backed Batista, looking to improve his authoritarian image, subsequently Castro was released in 1955 as part of a general amnesty. Castro ended up in Mexico, where he met fellow revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara and plotted his return. In 1960. Castro nationalized all U.S.-owned businesses, including oil refineries, factories and casinos. This prompted the United States to end diplomatic relations and impose a trade embargo that still stands today.As a country with a new government, Cuba seemed newly established to the world around it. Change was occurring in Cuba, and the U.S. was not hesitant to impose ideas and...

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