Free Essay

Sedation Verses Euthanasia

In: Other Topics

Submitted By rasron
Words 1672
Pages 7
Sedation verses Euthanasia
The ethical principle of non-malefiecense is the duty to do no harm. This is promoted by doing three interventions. First intervention is avoiding deliberate harm, risk of harm that occurs during the performance of nursing actions. The second intervention is considering the degree of risk permissible. The third intervention is determining whether the use of technological advances provides benefits that outweigh the risks.
The ethical principle of beneficence is the doing or active promotion of good. This is done by providing health benefits to the patients, balancing the benefits and risks of harm, and considering how a patient can be best helped. The ethical principle of Justice is the promotion of equity or fairness in every situation a nurse encounters. The two nursing implications that promote justice are ensuring fair allocation of resources, and determining the order in which clients should be treated. ("Ethical Principles," January 2011, p. screen)

There are several nursing ethical arguments on Euthanasia. Those that are against mercy killing have the ethical arguments that euthanasia might not be promoting the patient’s best interest, accepting that it means acknowledging that some people are more important than others, weakening the society’s respect for the holiness of life, and arguing that if voluntary euthanasia were to become legal nationwide, then most probably involuntary euthanasia will be committed at a higher level. The ethical arguments for those in favor of euthanasia are people having a right to die, euthanasia causing no harm to others and the state, therefore people having no right to interfere with someone’s own decisions, once euthanasia can be legal and regulated by the state, then involuntary euthanasia can be monitored and prevented therefore allowing a terminally ill person to die, will free, alleviating the family of any financial burdens that the terminal illness may cause. ("Ethical Issues: Euthanasia," January 2011, p. screen)
Family members and caregivers should be educated about the implications of sedation and care associated with it. The patient typically loses their protective mechanisms with increased levels of sedation. Oral intake becomes a risk factor for aspiration. The patient should be provided with lubrication and moisture to oral mucous membranes in order to avoid dry moth and corneal irritation. Most family members or caregivers can be taught basic care and comfort measures. This offer is meaningful to the family members and aids in carrying out the wishes of the patient who wants to die at home. Family should also be informed of medication comfort measures to be taken and the patient’s likely hood of being in a deep sedated state towards the end of life. The family must be in acordance with the road to deep sedation as the illness overcomes the patient and death is near. Families of terminally ill patients play a valuable role as caregivers and must serve as formal and informal proxy decision makers.
Euthanasia is the intentional ending of life, by way of practice, in order to relieve pain and suffering quickly. It is considered to be a criminal homicide that is prosecutable by law in all but 3 states (Washington, Oregon, and Montana). (Wreen, 1988)
These ethical principles have provided a foundation for the nursing practice. They are defined as a basis for nurse’s decisions on consideration of consequences and of universal moral principles when making clinical judgments. The most fundamental of these principles is respect of person. According to the American Nurses Association, the most fundamental principle of professional behavior is the respect for persons. The principle not only applies to the clinical settings but to all life’s situations. The principle emphasizes that all people should treat one another as a worthy individual. In nursing practice, it is important that this principle should be simplified. Therefore, respect for persons generally means respecting a patient’s autonomy. The primary and basic ethical principles are respect for autonym, no maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Respecting a patient’s rights, values and choices are synonymous to respecting a person’s autonomy. A method that promotes and respects a person’s autonomy is an informed consent. A patient and family must be offered enough information and options to make up their mind free of coercion or external and internal influences in order for a patient and family to make an autonomous decision and action. ("Ethical Principles," January 2011, p. screen)
It is important for health care professionals to discover with families any reservations associated with the period of passing and any tradition or spiritual ceremonies that may be significant to them. Such ceremonies might include a specific way to place the body. The Islamic patient must have the head of the patient facing Mecca at the time of death. The orthodox religions practice mandates same-sex caregivers or family members wash the body. When loss occurs, manifestations of grief by those beside differ greatly, dictated in part by tradition and in part by their planning for the death. The family should be consulted with if they would like a Chaplain to be contacted for bereavement. One the family is ready the nurse is there to assist with making any important phone calls for the family which may include calling an estranged family member, or even the funeral home.( Higo,2012).
Several patients dread uncontrolled pain during the last days of life, while communicating apprehensions that opioid use may speed up death. The family and healthcare professional may likewise share this fear and should be openly discussed amongst all involved. Experience suggests that most patients can attain pain relief through the final hours of life and that very high does of opioids are rarely needed. Awareness may diminish throughout this time and swallowing becomes tough, practioners should anticipate substitutions to the oral route. Sublingual medications are the preferred route when the patient is no longer able to swallow.
Palliative care nursing focuses on comprehensive physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual care of the terminally ill person and their families. It includes the administration and monitoring of medication, recognizing refractory symptoms, advising the healthcare team of those symptoms, affording psychosocial support and education to the patient and family, as well as identifying specific cultural needs in relation to dying and death. (Lawson, 2012)
The nurse’s role is vital in assessing and monitoring the patient receiving palliative sedation. The aim is to provide comfort and symptom control. For example, the assessment changes from merely monitoring respiratiory depression, to looking for signs of respiratory distress and hunger for air. The nurse must be advanced in assessing for nonverbal cues that are indicative of ongoing pain, unrelieved symptoms, or severity of suffering. These symptoms can be observed by way of facial expressions, body movements, or agitation. Consciousness should be monitored by way of eyelash reflex. A stroke across the eyelash, while closed, should cause a diminished flicker or reflex. Lack of response to the test indicates deep sedation, indicating a change in dose administration It is important that the palliative care nurse be will trained in these assessment tools to avoid crossing the line of sedation into the realm of euthanasia. (Lawson, 2012)
In conclusion, palliative sedation relieves the patient from suffering when a cure for their illness is not possible. As caregivers, we must look to provide support and meet the needs of the dying patient as well as their family. It is also important that we are aware of changes in the patient’s condition so that their needs are met throughout the dying process to facilitate ease and comfort, as well as ensuring that the adequate staff and resources are available to meet the needs of the dying patient. Be aware of cultural considerations and adequate family support, as this will also enhance quality of life that is associated with death at home. (Fields,2007).
As with euthanasia, it is important to be aware of all laws that are set into place whether they are the laws of society or faith-based laws. The patient who seeks end of life care should understand that the dying process is a deliberate process and not hasty. The healthcare provider should look for cues that may indicate possible euthanasia. Provide the patient and family with adequate information to make a decision regarding the decision for end of care life and ensure that the patient is not being forced to take sedative medication to end their life whether it’s in relation to their current illness, to relieve the family of burden or at the doctor’s request. In these instances, it is important to advocate for the patient and ensure that they are being treated with respect and that their rights are not being violated. In the end, the patient should die with comfort and dignity at their own will and not at the will of others. (Rady,2012)

References
Ethical Arguments of Euthanasia. (January 2011). Retrieved from www.nursingcrib.com
Ethical Principles. (January 2011). Retrieved from www.nursingcrib.com
Lawson, M. (2012, May 28). Palliative Sedation: Role of the Nurse. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 15(6). Retrieved from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/758639_4
Wreen, M. (1988). The Definition of Euthanasia. Philosophy and phenomenological research, 48, 637-640. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2108012
Rady, M., & Verheijde, J. (2012). Distress from voluntary refusal of food and fluids to hasten death: what is the role of continuous deep sedation?. Journal Of Medical Ethics, 38(8), 510-512.
J Med Ethics 2012;38:510-512 doi:10.1136/medethics-2011-100278
Fields, L. (2007). DNR does not mean no care... do not resuscitate. Journal Of Neuroscience Nursing, 39(5), 294-296.
Higo, M. (2012). Surviving Death-Anxieties in Liquid Modern Times: Examining Zygmunt Bauman's Cultural Theory of Death and Dying. Omega: Journal Of Death & Dying, 65(3), 221-238.
Chater, K., & Tsai, C. (2008). Palliative care in a multicultural society: a challenge for western ethics. Australian Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 26(2), 95-100.
Oberle, K., & Allen, M. (2006). Ethical considerations for nurses in clinical trials. Nursing Ethics, 13(2), 180-186. doi:10.1191/0969733006ne836oa…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...longevity and medical advances, a discussion over euthanasia is kindled in the last years. The term euthanasia (Greek, “beautiful death” ) originally means that humans, who did not feel their life worth living due to outside influences as a right to a self-chosen death possessed. In Europe, there are different ways of handling euthanasia determined by laws. To discuss this complex topic in the range of this paper, it is necessary to circumscribe the content. In general, there are four different ways of euthanasia. Active euthanasia means killing someone on his explicit demand, normally practised by physiscians with pharmaceutical additives. Indirect euthanasia describes the medical therapy to avoid unendurable pain under accepting a shorter life expactancy. The third way is passive euthanasia, which implies the abdication of life prolonging measures. The fourth and last method of euthanasia is medically assisted suicide. In fact, this stands for giving someone the possibility to commit suicide, whereas the patient has to do the last step on his own. To discuss and describe the different ways of euthanasia in a good way, we want to take a closer look to Europe, especially to the Netherlands, Switzerland and Germany. This selection is based on the fact, that there are the three major types of handling euthanasia with the corresponding judical solution in each country. In the Netherlands it is legal to practise active euthanasia by a physician with the corresponding......

Words: 2182 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...Euthanasia Euthanasia - Deep sympathy for the suffering Introduction Euthanasia is the deliberate killing either by omission or commission of a dependent person for their benefit. Arguments against euthanasia claim that the concern for happiness and human life and not their obliteration is the objective of any good governance. They say that the terminally ill are people who require protection from social, economic and family pressures, and who are particularly prone to this pressure as a result of chronic depression, pain and effects of continued medication. Arguments for euthanasia say it is impossible to maintain quality of life if a patient is dead. While there have been massive arguments, debates and campaigns against euthanasia, this paper will seek to support euthanasia because of the moral issues that relate to the topic. This paper supports that when a personal is physically dead, the only reason anybody wishes to keep them alive is for their selfish clinging onto them with the hope of a miracle and the fear of closure without regard to the wishes of the person. It supports the practice of euthanasia and seeks to evaluate the reasons why euthanasia should be legalized. This paper will have a general audience because of the controversy that it sparks every time it comes up Death is a dreaded subject for all human beings because it signifies leaving the known to go to the unknown. This is the reason why by its nature euthanasia is a hugely hushed up......

Words: 1514 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...condition affecting motor neurons of brain and spinal cord. Her prognosis was a short life expectancy that had the prospect of a slow and painful death, and eventual complete paralysis, while remaining mentally competent throughout the process. Therefore, Sue requested the right to participate in voluntary euthanasia to have the option to end her own life with dignity. The law in Canada prohibits physician assisted suicide, so she challenged the law in court. However, the British Columbian court ruled in majority against Rodriguez. Rodriguez then appealed the court’s decision to the Supreme Court of British Columbia but the court had dismissed her appeal to participate in voluntary euthanasia with one dissenting judge and forwarded it to the parliament. The final decision made by the parliament was brought before the supreme court of Canada, which resulted in a 5-4 majority decision in favor of the current law that criminalized physician assisted suicide. Sue Rodriguez case embodies a serious ethical dilemma. It raised many philosophical and moral issues; this essay will analyze the various issues that justify the Supreme Court of Canada’s majority decision verses the dissenting judges. The key arguments that Rodriguez made in court were section 241(b) of the criminal code of Canada. Section 241(b) states that: anyone who aids or abets a person to commit suicide, whether suicide ensues or not, is guilty of an indictable offence liable to imprisonment for a term not......

Words: 1991 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...nurses around the world have been discussing different topics to try to find cures for all kinds of health issues people are faced with. One main topic that has been discussed is Euthanasia, which is the act of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy. Euthanasia is also called medically assisted suicide by a lot of people. It was also originated from the Greek language and occurs in every race of people. Euthanasia should not be forced on anyone but has good reasons in some cases. “There are two types of Euthanasia, active and passive. Active Euthanasia is death by commission. Passive Euthanasia is death by emission.” (Mcmanaman 2). Active Euthanasia is very simple from a moral point of view. It is never justified though because it always amounts to murder. Passive Euthanasia can be of good and of immeasurable value regardless of the condition of the patient. (McManaman 2). If you are not very ill or in a dying state these actions will not be performed on you, because then it will just be just like murdering a patient. Either type of Euthanasia should only be able to be legally processed. If it is not legally processed whoever is a family member of one who has been killed by it can sue whoever was given the euthanasia to kill their family member. This is a very serious and offensive case so therefore the consequences will be highly looked at. A recent debate that has been going on is that......

Words: 1948 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...Euthanasia: Live and Let Die April 11, 2013 Euthanasia: Live and Let Die In 2004, Pope John Paul II said “A man, even if seriously sick or prevented in the exercise of its higher functions, is and will be always a man… he will never become a ‘vegetable’ or an ‘animal’. The intrinsic value and personal dignity of every human being does not change depending on their circumstances” (Pope John Paul II, 2004). Euthanasia or assisted suicide is the deliberate action of ending a life in order to relieve unstoppable suffering. Euthanasia is legal in Albania, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as well as some US states. In some of these countries, euthanasia is generally executed by a medical professional taking into account his patient’s needs and desires; but sometimes a medical professional can dispense the last medication ending his patient’s life without the patient’s consent. However, euthanasia and assisted suicide is forbidden in the majority of countries and could be penalized by a fourteen years prison sentence. (“Euthanasia and assisted, intro”). Legalizing euthanasia is extremely controversial moral and legal issue throughout the world, but achieving that goal is extremely necessary. Although legalizing euthanasia could cause negative effects for society, the positive side of this controversy indicates that asking for death is important for those patients who have decided that after a certain point, the pain has exceeded the desire of living. On the one hand...

Words: 1548 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

... Euthanasia/Assisted Suicide Debate Marissa Burton HCA 322 Mark Metzger April 29, 2013 Dying has become a dilemma. The act of dying has transformed in recent technological advances by making it possible not only to lessen pain but also to extend life. However, when treatment fails and modern medicine has nothing more to present to patients, they may demand for a life ending act. When patients and their family become aware of the quality of life and a great deal of unbearable pain, conflict often introduces itself between health care professionals who are trained to save lives, and patients and their families, who desire to end all suffering. According to Pozgar (2013), the focal point of this conflict is on the concept of euthanasia and its position in the modern world. The issue has been at the middle of some very heated debates for many years (p.123). Euthanasia can be defined as the act or practice of terminating a person’s life in order to relieve them of their suffering from incurable conditions or diseases. Euthanasia is also known as “the mercy killing of the hopelessly ill, injured, or incapacitated”. The dividing of euthanasia into two categories, active and passive, is for many the most controversial aspect of this topic (Pozgar, 2013). Active euthanasia takes place when the medical professional, or another person, intentionally do something that causes the patient to die. Passive euthanasia takes place when the patient dies because the medical professional......

Words: 1984 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

Euthanasia

...Argumentative Essay: Euthanasia Euthanasia is another term for mercy killing. It is usually done by doctors to their patients who are terminally ill. Although euthanasia is done by doctors in certain situations to patients and is legal in some countries, euthanasia should not be practiced or be legalized because it devalues lives, it might become involuntary and doctors should cure and not kill. According to the article “Euthanasia: Arguments Against Euthanasia”, people might think that death is better than being sick. They might think that death is the only solution to problems. People who support euthanasia say that it is done as self-defense. For example, a soldier is brutally wounded and might die if not treated immediately. Is partner decides to ask his consent for euthanasia to end his suffering. Killing for self-defense means that you kill to save another one’s life but in euthanasia, you do not save anyone’s life. Euthanasia devalues lives because it tells us that we can take our or someone’s life easily. Euthanasia is done to a person with his consent. It is the decision of that person if he wants to do it. According to the article “Arguments Against Euthanasia”, people might decide to go for euthanasia because of emotional and psychological pressures. For example, a patient is suffering because of an illness and his doctor said to him that it is better for him to die. That person might go for it because he suffers too much and his doctor said that it is......

Words: 416 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...IssUEs Of EUThANAsIA: ARGUmENTATIvE EssAy Bilal S. H. Badr Naga Majd T. Mrayyan (1) Bilal S. H. Badr Naga., MSN, RN, Prince Sultan Cardiac Center in Qassim, Saudi Arabia (2) Majd T. Mrayyan., Prof, RN, The Hashemite University, Jordan Correspondence: Bilal S. H. Badr Naga., MSN, RN, Prince Sultan Cardiac Center in Qassim, Saudi Arabia Email: Bilal_badrnaga@yahoo.com Case scenario Abstract Euthanasia is one of the issues that has been the subject of intense debate over time. It has been a pertinent issue in human rights discourse as it also affects ethical and legal issues pertaining to patients and health care providers. This paper discusses the legal and ethical debates concerning both types of euthanasia. It focuses on both the supporter of euthanasia and the opponent of euthanasia. Several statements for the Euthanasia argument arediscussed: a merciful response that alleviates the suffering of patients which is sometimes wrongly perceived to be otherwise unrelievable; the autonomy in which the patient has the right to make his own choices; the regulation and legislation of existing practices of euthanasia to protect health care providers and patients. In this heated debate religious, political, ethical, legal and personal views are also included. Among all these, those who desperately want to end their lives because they simply cannot go on in any way, are the ones who suffer. Every individual or group has a different viewpoint regarding euthanasia. Euthanasia is......

Words: 7058 - Pages: 29

Free Essay

Euthanasia

...Persuasive Essay 10 - 12: Euthanasia: Should humans be given the right to play God? Should humans be allowed to play the role of God? Legalising euthanasia would do just that. Euthanasia is where individuals who are terminally ill elect to end their own life. This has and will continue to be a contentious issue with the right people’s religious beliefs conflicting with those of the rights individual. The power to play with people's lives should not be handed out under a legal and/or medical disguise. Thus euthanasia should not be legalised. The term 'Euthanasia' comes from the Greek word for 'easy death'. It is the one of the most public policy issues being debated about today. Also called 'mercy killing', euthanasia is the act of purposely making or helping someone die, instead of allowing nature to take its course. Basically for advocates of the practice of euthanasia it means killing in the name of compassion. However this view is contradictory to religious beliefs, who are these medical people to meddle in the God’s plans. Euthanasia promotes abuse and gives doctors the right to murder all in the name of ‘compassion’. All proponents in the euthanasia debate will agree that no matter the safe guards put in place around this practice; this process is susceptible to abuse. As Dr. J Forest Witten warned that euthanasia would give a small group of doctors "the power of life and death over individuals who have committed no crime except that of becoming ill or being born, and......

Words: 1645 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...Euthanasia and end of life medical care. There are many questions that can be asked about this controversial topic. When a person chooses a stance on Euthanasia or assisted suicide as its sometimes called, one is either for or against. There isn't much middle ground to be had. I personally am for euthanasia or even terminal sedation because if my quality of life reaches the point that I am a burden to family and on myself and in constant irreversible pain I should be able to make my own choice if I am of sound mind. I do also believe there should be laws and provisions that must be satisfied before hand. Society, politics and religion tell us that euthanasia takes the value away from human life, that it is immoral in religion and can lead to potential financial gains if left unchecked. Valid arguments exist for those for and against the subject but the right questions need to be asked. Since we are born with the ability to make our own choices when is it acceptable to end ones own life? First and foremost the patient's personal feelings should be taken into consideration. Secondly, the family of the patient’s feelings and needs cannot be taken lightly. Is there considerable pain and suffering involved that cannot be repaired. Medical professionals should take into consideration the patients wants and needs while looking at it as professional as well. Is the patient suffering from an incurable communicable illness? Are there any treatment options left to......

Words: 340 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

... INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN ETHICS TOPIC: EUTHANASIA COURSE NO.: RELT 255 INSTRUCTOR: KIGUNDU NDWIGA, PhD BY: CHRISTINE W. THAIRU STHACH 1511 OCTOBER 2014 EUTHANASIA 'Euthanasia' is a compound of two Greek words - eu and thanatos meaning, literally, 'a good death'. Today, euthanasia is generally understood to mean the bringing about of a good death - 'mercy killing,' where one person ends the life of another person for the sake of this person whose life is to be ended. Euthanasia, also refers to the practice of intentionally ending a life in order to relieve pain and suffering, and a deliberate intervention undertaken with the express intention of ending a life to relieve intractable suffering. It incorporates an agent; a subject; an intention; a casual proximity, actions of the agent lead to the outcome. A non-voluntary euthanasia is illegal in most countries. For voluntary euthanasia the process has to:- i) Include patient request ii) Take into consideration the amount of suffering the patient is experiencing iii) Discuss and pursue alternative course of action iv) Presented to the patient all available information A person who undergoes euthanasia usually has an incurable condition. In many cases it is carried out at the person’s request but there are times when they may be too ill and the decision is made by relatives, medics or courts. Very often people will call euthanasia “mercy killing”, perhaps thinking of it for......

Words: 1367 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...Running head: EUTHANASIA Euthanasia: A Silent Plea for Mercy Shannon Curry University of Southern New Hampshire Professor Henson Tuesday December 23, 2014 Euthanasia: A Silent Plea for Mercy All over the world there are amazing technological advances in medicine happening every day, despite that there are neonatal patients suffering from painful life limiting medical conditions that have no treatment or cure. “Advances in medical technology make it possible to extend life, at times, the focus on ‘cure at all costs’ overshadows the obligation to provide dignified, humane, and compassionate care” (Rushton, 2005). In an effort to provide legal, humane and compassionate end-of-life care to infants, the Dutch developed the Groningen Protocol in 2003. Developed in collaboration with the prosecutor’s office, the Groningen Protocol was designed to guide a transparent medical and legal decision making process for parents and their doctors considering neonatal euthanasia (Catlin, 2008; Petrou, 2005). Neonatal euthanasia is the practice of hastening the death of a terminal ill newborn in an effort to relive their suffering.  Most countries current laws make it illegal for the neonatal population to benefit from euthanasia. Research is suggestive that albeit in secret neonatal euthanasia maybe disguised and illegally practiced around the world. Legalizing neonatal euthanasia would not only allow......

Words: 2327 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Euthanasia

...The ethical dilemma of euthanasia Euthanasia is a sensitive and controversial topic that is enveloped in endless ethical debate and ambiguity. There are several forms of euthanasia, each having arguments for and against. Active euthanasia is when death is brought about by an act – carried out by a person to cause the patient to die, for example giving the patient an overdose of medication. Passive euthanasia is when death is brought about by an omission – withdrawing life extending treatment. Voluntary euthanasia is when the patient wants to die and requests help to do so. Non-voluntary euthanasia usually occurs when a patient does not have the capacity to make their wishes known, for example a patient who is severely brain damaged. Involuntary euthanasia is often viewed as murder, when a person does not want to die but is killed anyway. (bbc.co.uk, 2009). Euthanasia is currently illegal throughout the UK, reflecting the status quo of most countries, although there are a few countries where acts of euthanasia are legally permitted under certain highly regulated conditions. Under the Suicide Act 1961 any person that “aids, abets, counsels, or procures” in the suicide (or attempted suicide) of another will be liable for a prison sentence not exceeding fourteen years. (Suicide Act 1961 section (2) 1). However people are not prevented from using services where euthanasia is legal. This attracts no liability if the patient is capable of coming to this arrangement by......

Words: 1048 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Euthanasia or No Euthanasia

...Euthanasia or no Euthanasia? The question of whether Euthanasia should be legalized, in my opinion, lies upon a religious matter: Who are we to choose when somebody should die or continue to live? Same way a murderer is condemned to a punishment when ending somebody’s life, it is not because we feel that we are helping others that we should not be punished. As the years go by, medicine develops and will be able to cure these long-term illnesses, rather than the idea of them consuming us that the paragraph argues. I must admit that I am looking at this through my Jewish education, which has taught me that we cannot choose when to take a human’s life, and that we are a superior race to the rest of the animals. For that reason, we can choose when to end a suffering animal’s life, but not when it comes to a human life. It is a human duty to cure, not to kill. With sufferance and with any illness it is our duty to work to cure that person and to hope for the best, not to quit and end their lives. What is more, euthanasia is usually practiced on patients who have lost the ability to communicate with others, so therefore we would be ending somebody’s life without their own consent. And even if we do have his consent, same way we would not let somebody jump off a roof, we would not let somebody kill himself with euthanasia. We should want to help them, to give them a hand and help them through the hard moments. Sometimes helping means coming up with a cure, sometimes it is just......

Words: 339 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Verses

...Old Testament Bible Verses The Lord does not look at the things man looks at.  Man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.  1 Samuel 16:7 Surely, God is my salvation; I will trust and not be afraid. The Lord, the Lord, is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation. Isaiah 12:2 I will lead the blind by ways they have not known, along unfamiliar paths I will guide them; I will turn the darkness into light before them and make the rough places smooth. Isaiah 42:16 The Lord your God is with you, he is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, he will quiet you with his love, he will rejoice over you with singing. Zephaniah 3:17 So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand. Isaiah 41:10 Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight. Proverbs 3:5-6 Yet the Lord longs to be gracious to you; he rises to show you compassion. For the Lord is a God of justice. Blessed are all who wait for him! Isaiah 30:18 For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.  Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.  You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. Jeremiah......

Words: 788 - Pages: 4

Subwoofers | Riki Takeuchi | Thi Mai Rumo ao Vietnã