Premium Essay

The Administrator's Role in School Culture

In: Other Topics

Submitted By metcalf
Words 539
Pages 3
The Administrator’s Role in School Culture
NAME
Grand Canyon University: UNV 501
04/24/2013

The Administrator’s Role in School Culture
“School culture has been described as being similar to the air we breathe. No one notices it unless it becomes foul” (Freiberg, 1998). Culture within schools can create an environment where learning is positive, or it can put serious constraints on the school’s ability to function. Whether you work in a school, in a doctor’s office, or in a major company, employees prefer to work in an environment that is engaging and fulfilling.
How does a principal create an environment conducive to learning in today’s society? After reading my articles and reflecting on my own experience, a principal’s role and responsibility in a school is multifaceted. A principal must guarantee classroom instruction is aligned to state standards, design instruction that promotes student success in the 21st century, maintain improvements on the campus, develop meaningful partnerships with all stakeholders; all while developing a culture where everyone feels appreciated. An effective principal has many roles and responsibilities while creating an environment that encourages learning and is engaging for students, teachers and staff.
Without a doubt, a principal must embrace all of these roles and responsibilities as they are important factors in leading a school to produce positive results. However, creating a positive culture in school is imperative in welcoming a successful learning environment. A school principal that is aware of the importance of school culture knows it is the soul of school improvement, progress and connectedness.
Principals in schools that are highly performing create a culture that empowers teachers so they can confidently prepare for state testing, promote professional learning organizations, value students, teachers and…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

School Culture Analysis

...Running head: SCHOOL CULTURE ANALYSIS School Culture Analysis Lisa Mack Grand Canyon University EDA 529 Dr. Tony Elmer July 21, 2009 School Culture Analysis The term school culture describes the environment that affects the behavior of the entire school community. School culture can be defined as the quality and character of school life. It is based on patterns of school life experiences and reflects norms, goals, values, relationships, teaching, leadership practices and the structure of the organization. Several studies have concurred that student performance is directly related to school climate. Students in schools with a positive school culture have higher achievements. Therefore, creating and maintaining a positive school culture should be essential to the role of school administrator. Good schools depend on a strong sense of purpose and leadership (MacNeil & Maclin, n.d.). Principals must steer their staff, students, and community in a common direction in an effort to establish a set of norms, goals, and objectives that describes their vision of learning and the overall objective of the school. A school administrator has a strong influence on shaping a schools culture (MacNeil & Maclin). Once a strong school culture is established, it tends to act as a powerful socializer of thought and programmer of behavior (MacNeil & Maclin). Yet, shaping and creating such a culture does not just inexplicably happen. It requires a......

Words: 1652 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Role of the School Counsellor

...Divya Srivastava THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL COUNSELLOR School counselling is a branch of applied psychology that deals with problems or behaviours that interfere with the academic progress or social acceptance of children in the school system. School counsellors assess cognitive functioning and identify mental retardation, giftedness, developmental delays, instructional difficulties, and learning disabilities. They recommend educational programs; assess behavioural and emotional problems, and support parents and teachers. They also deal with the full spectrum of social problems including family violence, peer interactions, substance abuse, sexual abuse, neglect and the influences of these problems on school functioning. School counsellors act as a screening and referral resource for a wide range of medical, social, and emotional disorders that interfere with academic functioning. In general, school counsellors study behaviour, protect and promote mental health, and apply the principles of psychology to improve school adjustment and learning. Specific services, however, depend on the competencies of the school counsellor and the needs of the particular school system being served (Koe, 1991). For instance, the school where I was placed for my field-work had a school counsellor who also had to fulfil the role of a special educator and a remedial teacher as and when the need arose. School counsellors are employed for the purpose of providing specialized support for students with......

Words: 5565 - Pages: 23

Premium Essay

Role of Religion in Human Culture

...Role of religion in human culture Anthropologists define religion as a cultural universal that encompasses beliefs and behavior concerned with supernatural beings, powers and forces (Kottak, 2013). Even though it is a human universal, the rules of religion vary from culture to culture. Even within the major religious traditions, there may be a great many variations. Methodist traditions are different from Baptists who are widely different from Catholic tradition. Signs of religion date back as far as sixty to one hundred thousand years. Prior to the Neanderthals there were no signs of religion. Neanderthals were the first to bury their dead, suggesting a belief in an afterlife. Religion serves many different functions in society. First and foremost, it provides an answer to universal questions humans have. These questions are: What am I? Where do I come from and where do I go? What is death? What happens when I die? Why do bad things happen? What is the meaning of life? Religion can provide a sense of comfort and security to people as it provides explanations for events that are outside of people’s control. It also can establish and “maintain social control through a series of moral and ethical beliefs along with real or imagined rewards and punishments. (Kottak, 2013)” For most religious people, their beliefs are the very core of their world views. These believes also are important in defining humans’ ideas of what is right and wrong. If one does the......

Words: 522 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Understanding the Role of Culture

...7/23/2013 Case Study # 1 Week 2 Understanding the role of culture Culture can be a combination, of rules, beliefs, techniques, artifacts, language, and religion, when these things come together it influence the human mind. With influence of culture in the human mind, it impacts the way business is conducted. We then look into corporate culture, which is what defines how managers and employees conduct themselves in the workplace of particular companies. The term corporate culture is also used when HR and Management want show a sense of community within an organization. It is well know that America is know as the melting pot, which means that we have people here from varying countries and different cultures. This means that workplaces in America are multicultural and everyone pretty much has to adapt to the culture set fourth in the office. Does this method work 100%, not always, but people adapt to it. Now with companies opening up in different countries it makes things a bit harder. Over the last 20 years many businesses have gone international, so it would be fair to say that multinational companies dominate international markets. They are many strengths regarding understanding the roles of culture, like cultural awareness, which helps a manager plan, organize, lead, and control in a specific international setting. The awareness helps managers understand, and have empathy to a person situation, and culture if need be. The other great thing is that it makes......

Words: 543 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Role of Parents and Schools

...ROLE OF PARENTS AND SCHOOLS Chris Steininger Institution Affiliation Course Title Date Parents and schools play basic and vital roles in the growth and development of children in all aspects of their lives in the society. They are essential in the formation and shaping of character, the determination of virtue and in the end they are the basis for the existence of emotionally, spiritually, physically stable society. Right from the day a child is born, the kind of bond that is formed between it and its parents forms the basis to character development. The interaction between mother and child helps the child learn each and every basic element of both survival and acceptance into the systems that guide the existence of society ( Hunt; et al, 2010). Parents in the basic sense are their children’s first teachers. Through all the activities they are engaged in together as the child develops up to the pre-school level, parents help the child participate in cooking, cleaning and gardening, the child is slowly eased into the world of learning. The parents also provide the link to formal education by actively participating in their children’s schooling activities and thus making an easy transition for the children into the formal learning structures. Schools are charged with the huge role of moulding their charges from the moment they are enrolled with no or little formal education into a productive person in the society. This is a mammoth task which...

Words: 1022 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

The Role of Cultures in Global Management

...The Role of Cultures in Global Management   Abstract What is culture and how other people deal with culture on a daily basis. Countries around the world work daily with different cultures in a business setting. There are many different ways that culture practices get done throughout the world. Middle East does things different than what the United States does. Global management and cultures bring many issues with it. Managers and staff need to find new ways to handle values, beliefs and social norms when working a business around the world. Most businesses have an assortment of different cultures and backgrounds because there are different people working within the group. This “Group of people" has the same religion, language, beliefs, and values share a culture no matter what. This, in turn, joined with all different types of people in the same cultural system. An examination made of the art of administering groups who are from different cultures, taking into account their different set of values, carry out, and ways of achieving different goals. A review presented of some of the problems that inherent in from one country to another because manager reject or is helpless of internalizing the local culture in which the displacement operates. Culture provides two functions that affect global management today. With the growth in global activities of both domestic and multinational companies, managers need a good perceptive of culture. People’s......

Words: 2263 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

The Role of National Culture on Leadership

...Summary The aim for this thesis is to answer the problem statement: How do national cultures influence leadership styles? To give an answer to this question, this thesis is divided into three parts: leadership, national culture and the connection between them. The conclusion of this thesis is based on analytical and exploratory research. The first part, on leadership, focuses on mainly two types of leadership: transactional and transformational leadership. Transactional leadership is mainly based on the transaction between leaders and their followers. Bass described four components of transactional leadership: Contingent reward, Active management by exception, Passive management by exception and Laissez-Faire leadership (1997). Transformational leadership focuses mainly on inspiring and stimulating the followers. Transformational leadership contains also four components: Idealized influence (Charisma), Inspirational motivation, Intellectual stimulation and Individualized consideration. The second part focuses on different studies on national culture: Hofstede (1983), Schwartz (1990) and Inglehart (1997). Each study has different values and dimensions, both all three studies show some similarities. The first similar dimension contains: Hofstede’s Power distance, Schwartz’ Hierarchy versus Egalitarianism and Inglehart’s Survival and measures the degree to which the people in a national culture accept and expect the unequal distribution of power. The second similar dimension......

Words: 8555 - Pages: 35

Premium Essay

School Culture

...School Culture Analysis The term school culture describes the environment that affects the behavior of the entire school community. School culture can be defined as the quality and character of school life. It is based on patterns of school life experiences and reflects norms, goals, values, relationships, teaching, leadership practices and the structure of the organization. Several studies have concurred that student performance is directly related to school climate. Students in schools with a positive school culture have higher achievements. Therefore, creating and maintaining a positive school culture should be essential to the role of school administrator. Good schools depend on a strong sense of purpose and leadership (MacNeil & Maclin, n.d.). Principals must steer their staff, students, and community in a common direction in an effort to establish a set of norms, goals, and objectives that describes their vision of learning and the overall objective of the school. A school administrator has a strong influence on shaping a schools culture (MacNeil & Maclin). Once a strong school culture is established, it tends to act as a powerful socializer of thought and programmer of behavior (MacNeil & Maclin). Yet, shaping and creating such a culture does not just inexplicably happen. It requires a negotiation of sentiments of school stakeholders (MacNeil & Maclin). When points of view and beliefs compete in schools, deciding which ones are......

Words: 274 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Hrm and Its Role on Culture

...Culture plays a significant role in influencing the ways in which people are managed. This is the reason why cultural differences mandate different management practices. It is believed that Human Resource Management (HRM) practices are the most vulnerable to the cultural differences having significant implications for the appropriateness and design. International HRM has proposed that cultural differences result in varying individual preferences and perceptions that give shape to organizational behavior along with work motivation; conflicts; communications; defining goals; work-orientation; rewarding and performance appraisal, management styles and decision making. Some of the economic theories have also realized the significance of culture in giving shape to behaviors of institutions and individuals. It has been proposed that other than formal, the context of informal institution influences governance structures which coordinate the individual actions taking place within the firms. The significance of studying cultural differences with respect to HRM policies and practices in relevant practices and literature is twofold. Rising cultural diversity due to internationalization of global economy indicates that the global organizations are the most challenging context for implementation and designing of the integrated and unusual HRM practices and policies which address the cross-cultural concerns. Cultural differences on the other hand are significant for studying HRM......

Words: 810 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

School Culture Triage Survey

...What is culture School Culture There are various aspects to consider when developing a positive school culture. Deal and Peterson (1999, 2002) extensively researched this field and identified four key elements that promote and foster a positive culture: 1) vision and values 2) rituals and ceremonies 3) history and stories 4) architecture, artefacts, and symbols A school’s vision and values are identified through its mission and purpose; the heart and soul of a school’s culture (Deal & Peterson, 1999, 2002; MacNeil, 2005). In the 2010 inspection HMIE noted that "St Andrew's and St Bride's High School has a clear and confident sense of direction, based on its strong Catholic ethos, inclusive values, well established climate of achievement and culture of continuous improvement." Although the "Charter for Catholic Schools in Scotland" mission statement hangs prominently outside the Head Teachers office the true mission and purpose of our school is revealed through the actions, motivations, attitudes, and daily behaviour of the staff, pupils and parents. Rituals and ceremonies make up the second element of Deal and Peterson’s (1999; 2002) creation of a positive school culture. Whereas vision and values lay the groundwork in the establishment of a school’s shared mission and purpose, rituals and ceremonies are designed to afford school member’s time to “keep us connected, foster renewal, and provide opportunities to bond with others” while......

Words: 1902 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

The Role of Culture in the Workplace

...The Role of Culture in the Workplace Anne Marre S. Bautista The Chicago School of Professional Psychology The Role of Culture in the Workplace Culture is a crucial factor of human behavior. Over the last decade, culture has become a hot topic in organizations because of the explosive rise in the ethnic diversity in work places. This increase in cultural diversity comes with consequences which have resulted in the emergence of a need to build cross-cultural competencies among personnel in order to create work places that allow all employees to perform at the optimal capacity without being marginalized and made to fell incompetent or in adequate based on their cultural background and behavior norms, values and beliefs. Cultural differences within organizations can lead to challenges such as conflict and poor performance. Understanding the role of culture diversity in the workplace is important for organizations searching to build a competitive edge in the global market. This paper addresses the role of culture diversity on motivation and conflict within organizations. These issues were first revealed to me when I was 18 years old, and I got a job as a sales associate. I only worked there for two months. But I only needed two months to witness the role of culture in a workplace. I was one of the very few Asian associates. The other Asian was a Chinese young woman called Stephanie (pseudonym). The workers were predominantly Caucasians as well as were the clients who......

Words: 2403 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Divine Roles Across Culture

...University of Phoenix Material Divine Roles Across Cultures Part I Select one common divine role that recurs in world mythology. Possible options of divine roles include the following: father or mother divinities, divinities of war, home or hearth divinities, divinities of love, divinities of wisdom, divinities of medicine or health, divinities of the wind, divinities of agriculture, divinities of the sky, ruler of all the gods, and so on. Identify the role in the title of your table. Select two myths, each from a different culture, in which the divine role appears. Identify the divinity names and cultures in columns A and B. Complete the table by answering each of the five questions for both selected divinities. |Title: |Column A |Column B | | |Divinity Name: Zeus |Divinity Name: Odin | | |Culture of Origin: Greece |Culture of Origin: Norse | |How is this divinity portrayed? Describe the |Zeus is the ruler of the Olympian gods and ruler|Odin is the ruler of all gods. He lives in| |divinity’s role within the myth. |of all men. Zeus is the god of justice and is |the underworld called Valhalla where half | | ...

Words: 1129 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

The Role of Culture in Language Teaching

...Content Introduction 1. Comparative Teaching Methodologies 1.1 Grammar Translation Method 1.2 Direct Method 1.3 Audio-Lingual Method 1.4 Silent Way 1.5 Total Physical Response (TPR) Community Language Learning (CLL) 1.6 Suggestopedia (Suggestology) 1.7 Communicative Approach 1.8 Natural Approach 1.9 Emotional-semantic method 2. Theoretical aspect of effective methods of teaching 2.1 The bases of teaching a foreign language 2.2 Effective ways and techniques of teaching a foreign language 2.2.1 Constructivist teaching strategies 2.2.2 Communicative Teaching Method 2.2.3 Using project method in teaching a foreign language 2.2.4 The method of debates 2.2.5 Games 2.2.6 Role plays as a method of teaching 2.3 Methodological principles of modern methods of teaching 2.4 Practical aspect of ways of teaching 3. Comparative characteristics of modern techniques of teaching English 3.1 Features of techniques 3.1.1 Communicative method 3.1.2 Project methodology 3.1.3 Intensive method 3.1.4 Activity Based method 3.2 Similarities of methods 3.3 Positive and negative aspects of techniques Conclusion Bibliography Appendix Introduction Language teaching came into its own as a profession in the last century. Central to this process was the emergence of the concept of methods of language teaching. The method concept in language teaching—the notion of a systematic set of teaching practices based on a particular theory of language and language learning—is a...

Words: 23635 - Pages: 95

Premium Essay

School Culture and Student Prformance

...Quezon City SCHOOL CULTURE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN MATHEMATICS Presented by: Macaraeg, Emmerson C. Pelo, Emelani G. Reyes, Lovely Mar L. Salamat, Sarah M. to: Mr. Ruben E. Faltado III November 18, 2011 Introduction For over thirty years, the effect of schooling on student performance has been one of the major themes in educational research. Coleman’s study on equality of educational opportunity in the United States (Coleman, Campbell, Hobson, McPartland, Mood, Weinfeld & York, 1966) is often conceived as the starting point of what became later known as the school effectiveness research tradition (see, e.g. Creemers, 1994a; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Teddlie & Reynolds, 2000a). Considerations of the ways in which issues of culture show up in the Math classroom are central to each of the analytic planes. The Math classroom is the local site through which the culture system of Math education is enacted where particular types of Math knowing are privilege over others and where cultural enterprise of Math learning plays out in interactional space. School culture plays a vital role in student’s achievement in Mathematics. This study aims to offer a thoughtful treatment of the role of culture in teaching and learning of Mathematics and synthesize literature that is relevant to this concern from multiple sub discipline in education. The concept of culture refers to a group’s shared beliefs, customs, and behavior. A school’s culture includes......

Words: 707 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Role of Culture

...1.0 ROLE OF CULTURE It is very crucial for firms and people who are planning to invest or operate a business in a foreign country to understand the host countries’ business customs, value, and ethical behaviors in order to be successful. For instance consider the story of Benjamin Franklin, the great American diplomat, inventor, physic and politician. He was the only person who convinced the French to assist the revolutionaries in their battle for freedom from England. The biographers stated that the success was due to the fact that Franklin was aware of the French’s politics, history, arts, literature, values and norms. (Muller, 1991) From the above scenario, it is crystal clear that rely firms and people that rely on their home culture to compete in a foreign country tend to jeopardize their success due to the cultural variation. This is because culture affects the consumer behaviors, local demand, buying decisions and brand loyalty. So the question is what is culture? Culture is a framework of behavioral patterns, values, assumptions and experience shared by a social group which when taken together constitute a design of living (Davey, 2011) Culture has several characteristics. To begin with, culture is a learned behavior which is non-instinctive in nature; meaning we are not genetically programmed to learn a specific culture. For example any normal baby can be born and placed in any family around the world thus learning the culture and accepting it as its own.......

Words: 3345 - Pages: 14

Die Muppets erobern Manhattan | All AmericanS01E09 | Barbados