Free Essay

The Man Without a Memory

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By dunakey1
Words 1160
Pages 5
The Man without a Memory

Psych/575

January 27, 2013

The Man without a Memory
Remembering is what a person understands; understanding is only what the person pay’s attention to, and individuals only pay attention to what they want to (Keeley, 1997). Memory brings so much to our lives; whether it's’ contributions are positive or negative. Our memories write, underwrite, and re-tell our lives’ journeys. But what happens when this very luxury or curse is robbed from us? What happens when what is recalled and remembered is chosen for us? After viewing Clive’s story in ‘The Man Without A Memory,’ we are reminded not to take the things we remember, choose to remember, and choose to forget for granted. Within this paper, the relationship between learning something and remembering it is described. The specific area of Clive’s brain that was damaged is revealed; Clive’s loss of memory for most things except his memory for his wife and the piano are explained. Memories we would miss the most are described, and how emotions are linked to memories are examined.
Relationship between Learning and Remembering
To explain the relationship between learning and remembering, I would start with learning information such as preparing for a test. The student can remember the material for the test, but does not retain the information after the test to remember the knowledge. If the student learns the information for the test, but then retains the material, the student will remember what was studied to remember at a later time.
The Specific Region of Clive's Brain is damaged to Result in this Memory Loss
The hippocampus and medulla are damaged on the extensive left and a large amount on the right. The greatest damage is bilateral and to the left temporal lobe; the combination between inferior frontal and bilateral temporal lobe is usually extensive (Vattano, Bennett, & Butler, 2013). The space with the missing brain tissue was filled with cerebral spinal fluid on the left side of the temporal lobe and a large portion of the right, along with some of the lateral temporal lobe on the right. On the left side of the brain, a small remit of superior temporal lobe is left; everything else is gone on the right side except for some of the left lateral temporal lobe (Vattano et al, 2013). Extensive enlargement of the ventricular system: these are the ant to the horn of the lateral system. Clive’s corpus callosum is smaller, and there is just a little remnant fornix (Vattano et al, 2013).
Clive's loss of memory, despite his lasting memory for his Wife and the Piano
Clive’s loss of memory came from herpes viral encephalitis, which attacked his central nervous system (Vattano et al, 2013). The hippocampus was damaged which prevents short term memory to be transferred into long term memory leaving Clive unable to create lasting memories (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive’s procedural memory was not damaged by the virus which allows him to be able to conduct music and play the piano like he did before the damage, although when he is done he cannot remember what he played and shakes uncontrollably (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive can learn some minor facts by watching a video over and over, and that is because of procedural memory. He will not remember the video but can anticipate parts of video as he is watching it (Vattano et al, 2013). His learning capabilities are limited to what can be learned with the procedural memory; sadly most motor skills are damaged due to the hippocampus and he is unable to retain any new information (Vattano et al, 2013).
If you were Clive, what Memories Would you Miss the Most
Clive speaks about being completely confused, never eating anything or touching anything because he said it is like he is not alive (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive has very intense emotions when he sees his wife; he either believes he has not seen her for years or never seen her before, but he is totally in love with his her. Clive lives in the moment; he writes journal entries every day; nearly every entry he writes is as if he is awake for the first time (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive’s perception of his condition is just like death; no thought of any kind, no dreams, sight, sound, taste, no differences from day and night. I just don’t know anything at all; it’s just like death (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive is very angry and frustrated about his condition because he does not retain new memory. The memory I would miss the most, if I was Clive, would be if my spouse was there for me, but I could not remember this special moment because the memories would be gone within seconds.
Emotions linked to memories
Emotions are linked to memories per events in your life. When you have a special event, you like to remember those things and pull them out more often; these things create happy thoughts to come to mind. When you are traumatized with something bad happening to you, some things can associate emotions like anger, sadness, stress, along with other things in the environment to make you recall this event.
When it comes to Clive, memories are confusing to Clive. He started with a headache and didn’t respond to medication (Vattano et al, 2013). By the fourth and fifth days he was forgetting many things including his daughter’s name. Repeated himself many times and showed emotional behavior; gets upset when he is confronted by his notebook saying he wrote it down, but keeps forgetting (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive does not acknowledge that he is writing things down. He has very short term memory; Clive cannot remember things except moment-to-moment (Vattano et al, 2013). Clive’s life is a new experience each time, and every moment is like a new time. When he sees someone he has known for a long time, he does not remember those (Vattano et al, 2013).

Conclusion
While it has been described above; the story of Clive opens many doors to topics regarding memory. Whether those topics find their way into our own thoughts about the process, format, and importance of our own memory; this is defined within the content above. To its’ benefit, the relationship between learning something and remembering it is described, the specific area of Clive’s brain that was damaged is revealed. Clive’s loss of memory for most things except his memory for his wife and the piano are explained; memories we would miss the most are described, and how emotions are linked to memories are examined.

References
Keeley, M. (1997). Memory and importance of review. Retrieved from: http://faculty.bucks.edu/specpop/memory.htm
Vattano, F., Bennett, T., & Butler, M. (2013, February 17). The Mind Second Edition the Clive Wearing Story Pt. 2 Living without Memory [Video file]. Retrieved from YouTube website: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipD_G7U2FcM…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Memory

...MEMORY Memory is one of the most important concepts in learning; if things are not remembered, no learning can take place. Futhermore, memory has served as a battleground for opposing theories and paradigms of learning (e.g., Adams, 1967; Ashcraft, 1989; Bartlett, 1932; Klatzky, 1980; Loftus & Loftus, 1976; Tulving & Donaldson, 1972). Some of the major issues include recall versus recognition, the nature of forgetting (i.e., interference versus decay), the structure of memory, and intentional versus incidental learning. According to the early behaviorist theories (e.g., Thorndike, Guthrie, Hull), remembering was a function of S-R pairings which acquired strength due to contiguity or reinforcement. Stimulus sampling theory explained many memory phenomenon on the basis of statistical outcomes. On the other hand, cognitive theories (e.g., Tolman) insisted that meaning (i.e., semantic factors) played an important role in remembering. In particular, Miller suggested that information was organized into "chunks" according to some commonality. The idea that memory is always an active reconstruction of existing knowledge was championed by Bruner and is found in the theories of Ausubel and Schank. Some theories of memory have concerned themselves with the nature of the processing. Paivio suggests a dual coding scheme for verbal and visual information. Craik & Lockhart proposed that information can be processed to different levels of understanding. Rumelhart & Norman describe three...

Words: 9956 - Pages: 40

Free Essay

Memory

...Memory is essential to all our lives. Without a memory of the past, we cannot operate in the present or think about the future. We would not be able to remember what we did yesterday, what we have done today or what we plan to do tomorrow. Without memory we could not learn anything. Memory is involved in processing vast amounts of information. This information takes many different forms, such as images, sounds or meaning. For psychologists the term memory covers three important aspects of information processing. These aspects are encoding, storage, and retrieval. When information comes into our memory system, it needs to be changed into a form that the system can cope with, so that it can be stored. For example, a word which is seen may be stored if it is changed into a sound or a meaning. There are three main ways in which information can be encoded. These ways are visual, acoustic, and semantic. For example, how do you remember a telephone number you have looked up in the phone book? If you can see it then you are using visual coding, but if you are repeating it to yourself you are using acoustic coding. Evidence suggests that this is the principle coding system in short term memory is acoustic coding. When a person is presented with a list of numbers and letters, they will try to hold them in short term memory by rehearsing them. Rehearsal is a verbal process regardless of whether the list of items is presented acoustically or visually. The principle encoding system in......

Words: 734 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Memories

...Memories of Me 1. When I was twelve years old, my mother came home from the Doctor’s and told the family that she had breast cancer. A. Never let your worst day, remain your worst day. a. 12 years old, I didn’t know what breast cancer really meant, it wasn’t something really spoken of in 1983. b. Was my mother going to leave me, what if something went wrong? c. No one would tell me anything, I asked questions, but was told that I didn’t need to know. 2. November 11, 1992…. My oldest daughter Victoria Elizabeth is born. A. Never wanted to be a father, never had any inclination to become a father, I held that little girl in my arms, and never wanted to let her go. a. She was so small, I felt like I was going to break her. b. I looked into those wide brown eyes, looked at the wrinkled pink skin, the tiny hands and feet, and thought, she’s mine. c. I became weak all over, and cried. 3. December 25, 1998….. My Grandmother passes away. A. Why, when the woman who hated me more than anyone else on the entire planet dies, was I crying? a. I remembered the hate in her eyes, when she looked at me. b. I saw, in my minds eye, a strong woman, who grew up in an orphanage in the 1920’s. c. The last tie to a painful past was finally severed. 4. After ten years of trying, and several miscarriages, my wife Cheryl, finally becomes pregnant, and now, the baby is due November 23, 2012. A. I wanted to cry, I wanted to laugh,......

Words: 440 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Memory

...There are five requirements to memory management. What exactly is memory management? In simple terms it’s the computers process of controlling and coordinating computer memory by assigning blocks to various programs to optimize system performance. This usually gets divided into three areas application, operating systems (OS), and hardware. Each involves different methods of using memory in which case they would need requirements so that the memory is used accordingly. With that said, the following are memory management requirements in further detail. Taking into consideration how multiprogramming works and its general purpose we can determine that any specific program can not know in advance what will be running at that moment in the memory as it is being executed. Relocation provides the ability to execute a process independently. Especially since the main memory is being shared by multiple programs and applications at the same time. Relocation is basically the process of swapping back unused blocks of memory and returned to the main memory at a different location. Shared memory is accessible by multiple programs. They provide communications between each application, assuring there are no redundant copies produced. This methods helps the program exchange data quickly. Then we have the protection requirement. This is a strategy that manages access to memory found on your computer. Each specific process needs to be protected against unwanted interference, it should not......

Words: 382 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Memory

...30, 2013 Memory The human mind is a fascinating instrument that is very complex and even though we know quite a lot about it we still do not know everything. The human memory has three phases of memory interpretation; Sensory Memory, Short-Term Memory and Long-Term Memory. Knowing how each of these memories store information is comparison to a computer. The average adult knows anywhere between 50,000 to 100, 00 words.   The brain is incredible in protecting itself when injuries occur at times.   The Father of Psychology begins with Sigmund Freud and his analysis of Psychoanalysis and the theories he introduced. Freud had many theories that caused controversy throughout his career but in today’s society they are accepted and his findings were true then as they are now without the controversy. In the unconscious mind we absorb many things from learning to traumatic events and information is stored, processed and in some ways affect our lives if we don’t resolve the issues at hand then we carry them with us and they still may affect us as we grow older In 1968 two other Psychologist Richard Atkinson and Richard Shiffrin develop a model of the human mind with the understanding how memory storage is taken in and processed and recalled for later usage. The model is referred to Atkinson-Shiffrin model and is explained as three phases of sensory, short-term and long-term memories and how some of that information is taken in and processed to be recognized as long-term memory In......

Words: 338 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Memory

...Memory Carmela Briggs Psychology111 9/24/13   Memory Long-Term Memory is what stores events, skills, and things that we need for functioning in everyday life. It is how we remember our names and the names of our friends, family, and the people we are often in close contact with. It is vital to remember skills such as how to brush our teeth, get dressed, cook food, ride a bike, drive a car, and learn in our educational system. Without it, we would need assistance just to get through everyday life. On the other hand, short-term memory only briefly stores information. When dealing with short term memory, you may hear something one moment and within a few seconds not be able to recall what you just heard. To go back a day later and try to recall that information may be challenging because the information is no longer there. In knowing this when it comes to studying its best to do it in a repetitive manner. The more you read and look over something, the better chance you have of getting it stored in your long-term memory. So when it is necessary to retrieve the information it is there. Looking over some material only once may serve no purpose when test time comes. The information may be placed in your short- term memory and may be gone moments after reading. So, for best results when trying to retain information at a later date it is always best to do it with the long term memory in mind. Attention Giving focused attention to what is being read helps to make better sense......

Words: 770 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

The Man Without a Memory Paper

...A Man Without a Memory There is a relationship between learning something and remember it. Clive Wearing do not have this relationship because he suffered a serious infection called encephalitis causing him severe brain damage in several regions of his brain and totally destroyed the hippocampus, which important role is memory formation. In the video “A Man Without a Memory-Clive Wearing”, it talks about how his life and family was affected by him not remembering. This paper will let readers know what specific region of Clive’s brain was damaged which resulted in this memory loss and will also explain how his loss of memory for most things despite his lasting memory for the piano and his wife. This paper will also gives our personal opinion on if we were Clive, what memories would we miss the most and explain how emotions links to memories while given examples to support our answer. Relationship between Learning Something and Remembering It To define the relationship between learning something and remembering it, you must first determine what learning is. Learning is acquiring, constructing, or developing new knowledge or skills. In Bloom's taxonomy of learning, the cognitive domain consists of knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation (Terry, 2009). With this being said, knowledge (to know something) is to be able to recall the information. Comprehension is to understand the meaning of something. Application is being able to use a......

Words: 1379 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Memory

...MEMORY AND FORGETTING Memory – the ability to store information on our mind so that it can be used at a later time. Also, it refers to the way facts are impressed in our mind, retained and later recalled. And defined also as the process by which information is encoded, stored and retrieved. Process of Memory - Encoding refers to how you transform a physical, sensory input into a kind of representation that can be placed into memory. - Storage refers to how you retain encoded information in memory. - Retrieval refers to how you gain access to information stored in memory. Encoding, storage, and retrieval often are viewed as sequential stages. You first take in information. Then you hold it for a while. Later you pull it out. Before information can be stored in memory, it first needs to be encoded for storage. Even if the information is held in our short-term memory, it is not always transferred to our long-term memory. So in order to remember events and facts over a long period of time, we need to encode and subsequently transfer them from short-term to long-term storage. It was Herman Ebbinghaus, a German psychologist who pioneered the studies involving memory. He found out that materials and situations can easily be learned and remembered longer if they are meaningful and relevant. CONTENTS OF MEMORY Memories exist in the brain tissue. According to Karl Spencer Lashley, a neurophysiologist, he found out that the brain consist of an engram which contains......

Words: 1329 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Memories

...ead “Once More to the Lake” by E. B. White, pp. 97-100, and “Androgynous Man” by Noel Perrin, pp. 243-244. Select one of the pieces to write about. Both of these stories involve trips or vacations, time spent away from the author’s everyday environment. Both deal with memory and growing up. Take a look at how the author uses sentences to give details of the vacation or the trip. Are the sentences long, short, poetic, matter of fact? Then write about whether you think the author is successful in creating an interesting or moving piece about memory. What makes the writing successful for you? Select a favorite sentence from the piece and include it as a quotation with MLA citation, like this: “I read all the interesting articles in a couple of magazines I had, and then I went back and read all the dull stuff” (Perrin 243). Why is it a favorite for you? What was your reaction when you read it, and how did the author evoke that reaction? Do not post attachments to the forum. Type your answers in the text box provided or paste your material from Microsoft Word. Make your initial posts to the Forum by 11:55pm ET, Wednesday. Initial posts should be at least 200- 300 words. Students are expected to post on three separate days each week for full credit. During the week, read the messages posted by your instructor and classmates and join the discussion. Your instructor may ask questions, provide explanations, and include links to other resources.......

Words: 368 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Memory

...Memory Tamara Schantz PSY/300 November 19, 2015 Jennifer Simon Memory “There is no memory or retentive faculty based on lasting impression. What we designate as memory is but increased responsiveness to repeated stimuli” Nikola Tesla. The "Oxford University Press " (2015) defines memory as “the faculty by which the mind stores and remembers information”. Memories are the basis for entire life, who we are and who we will become. Without your memories who are you? How the brain forms memories and the process of retaining information is not completely understood, but in the last few decades’ much research has been dedicated to discovering the way the brain makes memories and where they are stored. Exploration of the brain has provided insight into identifying three critical phases of memory, the maintenance of memory, and the relationship between long-term memory and working memory. Memory can be divided into three critical phases; encoding, storage, and retrieval. All memories are made through sensory input such as, visual, acoustic, and sematic; information received by our brain must be encoded in order to store it or create a memory (McLeod, 2007). For example; memorizing a phone number can be done by encoding visually, writing the number down, or acoustically, repeating the number in your head. Encoding fires neurons in the sensory area of the cortex related directly to the sensation experienced then stored (Mastin, 2010). Memory storage is the location, duration,...

Words: 926 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Memory

...Stages of Memory During my research I found out that memory is the method of maintaining information over time (Matlin, 2005) Memory is also the means that we have a tendency to draw on from our past experiences so that we may use this data in the present (Stenberg, 1999) A man by the name of Herman Ebbinghaus conducted a pioneer research on the study of memory during the late 1800s and early 1900s, through the use of serial learning Ebbinghaus determined that much of what we learn is forgotten very shortly, even after just coming from a learning session. Memory is very important to all of our lives, without a memory of our past; we would not be able to operate in the present or think of the future. Without memory we would not even be able to remember what we did yesterday, what we done today or even what we plan on doing tomorrow. Without our memory we would not be able to learn anything. It is known that our memory is involved in processing large amounts of data. This data takes on many various forms like: images, sounds or meaning. The term memory covers three very important aspects of information processing. The three stages of memory are: Encoding, Storage, and Retrieval. The first stage which is the memory Encoding stage, this is when data comes into our memory system(from sensory input) it then needs to be changed into a form that the system can cope with, so that it can be stored. You can think of this similar to changing money into a different currency......

Words: 920 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Memory Man and Macbeth Essay

...is something they should not do merely because it could end with negative consequences; consequences that are almost always exaggerated a great deal. In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the protagonist Macbeth made many decisions to achieve his deepest and darkest desire which was to become king. In order to take a hold of what he wanted he took many huge risks, and in taking those risks he achieved his goal. David Baldacci’s Memory Man and “To Risk” by William Arthur Ward are both works of literature about taking risks, if no risks are taken then no ground can be gained and no rewards can be reaped. Through the rewards of taking a risk, the motivations behind risk taking, and the importance of taking a risk, these works of literature show that in order to achieve a goal, a risk must be taken. Very seldom do people think of the rewards of taking risks and just wallow in the aspects of what could go wrong however, risks need to be taken in order to achieve progress in life. The novel Memory Man was about taking a risk in order to achieve a goal. The protagonist of Memory Man took a risk by walking into his old police precinct disguised while the majority of the police officers were distracted by a serious emergency. “[Amos] knew this was stupid. Insane. He hadn’t been gone that long from the force. He could be recognized at any moment, like with Pete Rourke. But he didn’t care. He really didn’t. This was his shot. Maybe his only one. He was taking it.” (Baldacci 47). He took......

Words: 1676 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Memory

...Learning and Memory Humans are continually learning, storing and coding raw information that is sent to us from our sensory registers from the outside world. Because of such an overload of stimuli thrown at us, it is vital and necessary to learn as infants and throughout our lives how to store and process this information. We learn to pay attention to some material, while other data is filtered out immediately. Researchers have spent enormous amounts of time studying the different types of memory: short-term memory, long-term memory, procedural memory and declarative memory. Because the only way we survive, evolve and learn new skills and talents is by developing our minds and adapting to the ever changing demands of life. What scientists have discovered is that learning requires attention, coding and storing of past memories and experiences. In order to live healthy and happy lives, we can stimulate and encourage learning throughout our entire lifetime from infancy to late adulthood providing that our brain is biologically healthy and intact. Most important, scientists are now studying what simple changes can be made to stave off such diseases such as Dementia and Alzheimer’s. The only kind of memory that the world has ever been able to agree on is that one which saves occurrences from the past. Even more limiting is a methodical notion in which the procedure that creates memory (learning) is identified by the modification of the actions of an individual who...

Words: 1686 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

The Man Without a Memory

...The Man without a Memory PSYCH/575 October 31, 2011 Dr. B The Man without a Memory Relationship between Learning Something and Remembering it Learning is when we are able to attain a particular skill or piece of knowledge, and remembering takes place when you are able to utilize that knowledge or skill right away without having to go through the monotonous process of learning it (Carlson, 2010). Once the skill is learned it is stored in short-term memory and then once it is practiced often it is stored into long-term memory available for retrieval and instant application (Carlson, 2010). For example, in order to learn how to ride a bike you constantly practice being able to steady yourself while pushing the peddles in order to move forward. By the time you learn how to ride the bike you have practiced the skill so much that it is imprinted in your long term memory. Region of Brain Damaged The area of the brain that was damaged is the hippocampus; this was due to the total amnesia that was a result from his illness. The hippocampus is the region of the brain that relocates memories from the short-term memory to the long-term memory. “Wearing is not capable of forming new memories because his memory only last between 7 and 30 seconds” (MedLibrary, 2002, p. 1). Loss of Memory for Things Wearing only has moment –to-moment consciousness because he has not only retrograde amnesia but also anterograde amnesia, Wearing can still remember how to play the piano and conduct...

Words: 598 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Memory

...The reason I chose memory was because memory is something everyone use every day on the daily basis. Memory is one of the most fascinating topics you can ever hope to study in any field. It is a fundamental component of daily life. We rely on it so heavily, that it is not a stretch to say that life without memory would be close to impossible. Our very survival depends on our ability to remember who we are, who others are, our past experiences, what is dangerous, what is safe, etc. Its importance can't be understated. Memory is also composed of a complex set of modular processes, dynamically shaped by past experience, which organize ongoing experience. What we have experienced with people in the past has a profound influence on how we will experience our interactions with them, and with other people, in the future, yet the precise roles that different memory systems play in these processes have yet to be elucidated. Short-term memory involves a temporary synaptic modification, presumably consisting of transient alterations in the concentration, binding, or uptake of various neuro transmitter substances. Short-term synaptic enhancement refers to a model of such short-term memory processes, and it suggests a way that neurochemical activity might briefly maintain memories by modifying the synapse for brief periods of time. The mechanisms mediating STE appear to occur primarily in the presynaptic neuron, perhaps involving an increased number of synaptic vesicles releasing......

Words: 254 - Pages: 2

Chicago Med: Season ... | f rated57 | Pokemon_Ultra_Moon_MULTI8_EUR_3DS_PUSSYCAT