Premium Essay

Therapeutic Psychology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By anniefortune1
Words 2797
Pages 12
Assignment 01 due 15 April – 15 Multiple Choice questions

In the article by Gadd and Phipps (2012), they refer to the challenges faced by psychological and, specifically, neuropsychological assessment. Their study focused on a preliminary standardisation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (a non-verbal measure) for Setswana-speaking university students. The US normative sample is described as participants (N = 899) aged 18 to 29 years who were screened beforehand to exclude individuals with a history of neurological, learning, emotional and attention difficulties. The South African sample consisted of university students (N = 93) from both genders, between the ages of 18 and 29, who were screened in terms of hearing and visual impairments and any history of psychiatric or neurological difficulties. These students were from the University of Limpopo, Medunsa Campus. Critically evaluate the South African normative sample by answering questions 1 and 2.

Question 1
There are similarities and differences between the South African and the original norm sample. Given the purpose of the test, which characteristic(s) implies/imply that the local sample is appropriate?
(1) age
(2) absence of hearing and visual impairments
(3) absence of psychiatric and neurological difficulties
(4) all of the above

Question 2
Which unique characteristic would probably have the greatest effect on the performance of the local sample in comparison to the original norm sample?
(1) age
(2) hearing or visual impairments
(3) language Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (a non-verbal measure)
(4) culture

Gradidge and De Jager (2011) evaluated the psychometric properties of the Wellness Questionnaire for Higher Education. The Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients ranged between 0.80 and 0.96 for the seven subscales of the questionnaire and the test-retest coefficients ranged between -0.04 and 0.71…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Self Control Procedures Used in Therapeutic Psychology

...Self control procedures used in therapeutic psychology Self control procedures are cognitive and behavioural skills used by individuals to maintain self motivation and achieve personal goals. They are defined by Ruch (1984) as “procedures that involve the growing emphasis on asking people to set up personal systems of rewards and punishments to shape their own thoughts and actions.” The goal of self control procedures is to reduce behavioural deficiencies or behavioural excesses. They help individuals become aware of their own patterns of behaviour and to alter those patterns so that the behaviour will be more or less likely to occur. They are used by people who are dissatisfied with certain aspects of their lives for instance one may feel they smoke too much, exercise to little, or have difficulty controlling anger. Self control procedures include aspects like self monitoring and stimulus control and follow a particular process. Self control procedures are based primarily on the social cognitive theory of Albert Bandura. According to Bandura, ones behaviour is influenced by a variety of factors including one’s own thoughts and beliefs and elements in the environment. Self control procedures are useful for a wide range of concerns including medical, addictions, occupational and psychological. However self control procedures when used in situations where symptoms are severe, should be used in conjunction with other therapies. The self control procedures follow certain......

Words: 318 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Touch

...Therapeutic Touch Derived from several ancient healing practices, therapeutic touch is based on the theory of human energy fields. During therapeutic touch treatment, practitioners use their hands, without actually touching the person, to re-establish a healthy energy flow. Therapeutic touch seeks to restore balance within the body while also stimulating the patient's own healing response. The practice of therapeutic touch is used worldwide in thousands of hospitals, clinics, and private practices. It is an easily learned, successful complement to other healing programs. Clinical research has proven that this pleasant, painless treatment creates rapid relaxation, significant reduction in pain, acceleration of healing, and lessening of stress. Therapeutic touch works well with such common illnesses such as colds, headaches and muscle tension as well as with more complex conditions such as back injuries and arthritis. Therapeutic touch has also been used to treat patients with disabilities. The range of problems that can be treated with therapeutic touch is wide, from people with mental disabilities to those with physical disabilities. Therapeutic touch encourages changes in the human energy system affecting physical, mental and spiritual health and well-being. Patients can be treated for many different illnesses. For example, therapeutic touch can help people with depression while also helping to soothe body pain. It is an energy-based treatment that seeks to......

Words: 340 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Therapeutic Communication

...Therapeutic Communication Techniques | Examples | 1. Using silence | The client says: "We drink and smoke a lot here." The student thinks…how can that be…drinking alcohol in a state hospital? But says nothing…using silence…the client then says: "yes we drink a lot of cokes and smoke a lot." | 2. Accepting | "Yes" or "I follow what you said"  | 3. Giving Recognition | "I notice you combed your hair." | 4. Offering self | "I'll sit with you awhile." | 5. Using Broad Openings | "What would you like to talk about?"  "Tell me what's bothering you." | 6. Using General Leads (using neutral expressions to encourage continued talking by the client) | "Go on.    " Ummm..I am listening" "Tell me about it" | 7. Placing he event in time or sequence | "Was this before or after…?" "What seemed to lead up to…?" | 8. Making Observations | "You appear tense" "I notice you are biting your lips." | 9. Encouraging Description of Perceptions | "What do you think is happening to you right now…?" | 10. Restating | Client: "I can't sleep. I stay awake all night." Nurse: "You have difficulty sleeping"  | 11. Reflecting | Patient: "Do you think I should tell the doctor?" Nurse: "Do you think you should tell the doctor?" | 12. Focusing | "This point seems worth looking at more closely." "You said something earlier that I want you to go back to." | 13. Exploring | "Would you describe that more fully." | 14. Giving Information | "My name is…I am a student nurse.." | 15.......

Words: 427 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Therapeutic Jurisprudence

...basis for the above approach was founded on the concept of Therapeutic Jurisprudence (TJ), the notion that the law can play a role as a potential means of therapeutic influence and this could be achieved by making court proceedings more therapeutic to mentally ill prosecutors through involvement in treatment, MHCs hope to produce better outcomes for their defendants. The underlying belief of this approach is that the charges these individuals face are more a result of their mental illness than a criminality.  It must be noted that MHCs have expanded rapidly in the past several decades to provide more efficient coordination of treatment and supervision of prosecutors with behavioral health problems. A significant number of prosecutors in these court-based programs have co-occurring mental disorders, which predict early termination, re-arrest, and other negative outcomes (Arrigo, 2010). More recent years have seen a proliferation of problem solving courts designed to rehabilitate certain classes of prosecutors and thereby resolve the underlying problems that led to their court involvement in the first place.   Therapeutic Jurisprudence The term Therapeutic Jurisprudence first appeared in the law literature in the late 1980s, in the context of mental health law. TJ is defined as "the study of the extent to which substantive rules, legal procedures, and the roles of lawyers and judges produce therapeutic or anti-therapeutic consequences for individuals involved in the legal......

Words: 2318 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Touch

...Therapeutic Touch By Chelsie Boyce Let me begin by saying that after watching several videos (including those provided by you) and reading even more articles, I am more mixed about my acceptance of therapeutic touch. Before this assignment I would have said I was strongly against this practice, but now I am more open to the idea. However, I still believe that therapeutic touch is not a true form of medical healing. To begin with, the Merriam-Webster's Medical Desk Dictionary states that this alternative medicine is a practice where the nurse or practitioner treats a patient by passing his or her hands over a person’s body to promote relaxation, pain reduction and or healing. I must say that the thought of someone’s hands hovering over my body kind of makes me giggle. I keep replaying a scene from Karate Kid over and over again in my head and thinking “yea right” if only it were that easy. After reviewing my resources, I am still very skeptical. Yes, some stated that patients believed they were doing better. But to me that was just it… a belief. Those who had a strong faith in this technique did show signs of relaxation and possible improvement, but I am not sure if the technique caused the reaction or the patient themselves invited the result. Just like Emily Rosa’s experiment supported, as nurses or practitioners we want to believe we can feel the energy being given off and that we are interacting with our patient. Yet, more times than not we are wrong. ......

Words: 468 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Psychology

...social and biological factors to problems such as mental illness. - ‘Child health problems linked to fathers age’ BBC NEWS - Modern foundations of psychology came from G Stanley Hall, 1878, who was interested in recapitulation. - There are many different fields, which can lead from a degree in psychology such as social, cognitive and neuroscience. Although my main interest is clinical psychology, which involves reducing psychological distress and improve psychological well-being. - NHS QUOTE on what they deal with. - COLLEGE OF ST JOHNS how psychologists should behave. - Issues facing psychology today: Prescription power, negative stigma, client-to-patient relationship and confidentiality - How you must behave and what is expected of you. Am I insightful, its not something which can be taught but its difficult to see reasons for another persons problems, if you cant understand you own quirks. - SHRINK TALK QUOTE 1b) – Psychology is competitive and you should have a full understanding of whether this is the right career for you and what will be expected of you once you’ve become a psychologist. * UNIVERSITY QUOTE what they are looking for in a student in order to gain a place on a BSc psychology course. * What you need to do an MSc such as determination, passion and insight, the course should be a British Psychology Society accredited degree. With a classification of 2.1. - If you succeed, you can register for the Health & Care Professional Council......

Words: 666 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Encounter

...aim of this essay is to show how I have formed, maintained and disengaged from a therapeutic relationship within a practice setting. This will include a profile of the client from their perspective. For the purpose of this essay, the therapeutic relationship was formed within the community mental health team. Their role is the primary intervention service promoting awareness, growth and helping people to work through difficulties (Mind.org, 2013). The interventions provided aim to facilitate comfort, support and a provision of care. The client I have chosen to write this essay on is called Angelo. Angelo is a fictitious name created to protect the individual’s right to confidentiality (NHS, 2012, N.M.C, 2008). The interaction was conducted because of a 6 month cognitive enhancer medication (galantamine) review. I will show an understanding of the importance of a therapeutic relationship building and the values that influence the formulation of mental health nursing assessment and care planning (Schultz and Videbeck, 2009). Appendix 1 will show the plan of management including risk and relapse. Appendix 2 will show the individualised Risk Assessment (profile). In my conclusion I will reflect upon my therapeutic encounter and will address the importance of knowledge and qualities needed to form, maintain and disengage from the therapeutic relationship in mental health nursing. The therapeutic relationship is a term used in therapy which highlights a client’s preferences......

Words: 7701 - Pages: 31

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Relationship

...This assignment will focus on a short communication between myself and a mother (Caroline) whom I had met three times before, at the antenatal, birth, and six-to-eight week contacts. I had cancelled a three-to-four month visit with her that day on the advice of my mentor. Caroline was an experienced mum and the visit had been mainly to aid my development (Appendix One). She had sounded fine on the phone and had told me she was coming into clinic. Borton’s (1970) reflective model will be used to guide this essay, and I will analyse how the experience has improved my skills in building therapeutic relationships, while recognising areas that require work in order to fulfil my role. All names have been changed to protect confidentiality, as is the responsibility of any registered nurse (NMC 2008). Mental and emotional wellbeing in all family members is intrinsic to the wellbeing of children. The “Healthy Child Programme” (DH 2009) identifies the assessment and promotion of this area as a core part of the health visitor’s role. A common mental health problem that impacts on children is post-natal depression, affecting 10-15% of women (Royal College of Psychiatrists n.d.). Infants whose mothers have post-natal depression often have less positive life outcomes, as discussed in Every Child Matters (HM Treasury 2003). It can impact negatively on emotional, social and mental development, often demonstrated through behavioural problems (Wrate et al., 1985), and neurological problems......

Words: 3248 - Pages: 13

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Relationship

...Therapeutics Essay: Understanding Behaviour In psychology there are many theories of cognitive behaviour each with their own origins and aims. Within this text two psychological theories that will be discussed and how they can be effective within a health care setting with an introduction as to what psychology is. The two psychological theories that will be discussed are the Social Learning Theory as developed by Albert Bandura and the Humanistic Theory or also known as the Humanistic Approach developed by Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow and George Kelly. Psychology is known as the scientific study of the mind One of the theories that will be discussed within this text is the Social Learning Theory which was developed by Albert Bandura in 1977 after evaluating previous theories which had already been attempted by other psychologists. He also used Julian Rotter’s learning theory and incorporated these theories together. His theory states “that observational learning can occur in relation to three models” these models are; live model which is when a person is demonstrating a desired behaviour for example a child behaving well because they know that they will be rewarded by their parent for this type of behaviour. Verbal instruction which is when an individual describes in detail the desired behaviour and also instructs the person verbally on how to engage in the instructed behaviour, an example of this would be when a lecturer is discussing the appropriate behaviour......

Words: 1265 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Communication

...Assessment Task 1 – Written Reflection I believe that therapeutic communication is a form of psychotherapy in which the person doing face to face interviewing consciously uses strategies that encourage the patient to express feelings andideas and that convey acceptance and respect they are achieved through advancing the physical and emotional well-being of a patient in a non-judgmental way, while showing empathy and concern. The aim of therapeutic communication is to increase self-worth or decrease emotions such as anxiety and anger by putting together information to determine the illness. Ufema, J. (2008). More than just hand-holding. Nursing, 38(12). doi:10.1097/01.nurse.0000342039.82567.3a All health care professional study techniques of therapeutic communication, these techniques help the patient and health-care professional develop rapport and trust with one another during each other’s company for example when going to an appointment. For therapeutic communication to be successful, a mutual understanding between both the patient and the health care worker needs to be met. It is very important for the health care workers to use proper communication to prevent a misunderstanding between the health care worker and patient. This open communication shows a genuine and continual concern for what the patient is expressing. Throughout this essay I will be using the Driscoll model of reflection in nursing to express my understanding of the vignettes and making reference......

Words: 1197 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Courts

...Therapeutic Courts Through out the court system there is a up and coming alternate approach to sentencing, this approach is called therapeutic court. Therapeutic court is an alternate sentencing that can either shorten the jail time the offender was sentenced to or erase any chance of the offender serving any jail time at all. This sentencing combines both individual counseling as well as group counseling, also allowing these counselors to give random check ups with home visits and strict supervision. This type of court gives nonviolent offenders the chance to not only to stay out of prison but also the chance to better themselves by completing this “rehab like” sentencing and beating their addiction of drugs/alcohol. The history of therapeutic courts started in the mid 1980s when drug cases increased due to the war on drugs crackdown. More and more people were being arrested, prosecuted, and imprisoned for possession of illegal drugs. As time went on, drug abuse violations grew to “the largest single category of police activity - more than 1.5 million per year”(America’s Courts pg106) the majority of these crimes taking place in the countries largest urban areas. With the rapid increase of caseloads that were not seen as extremely dangerous crimes, courts soon began to seek alternative methods to help manage this drug abuse crisis. The idea that was created is known as drug courts and they viewed offenders not as criminals but as offenders with a drug abuse addiction.......

Words: 2368 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Alliance

...KANTHAROUP Term. Establishing an efficient relationship between client and counsellor is one of the key aspect in counselling. Every therapeutic session starts with the process of building up a therapeutic alliance. Bob Shebib defines the therapeutic alliance as a time limited period of consultation between a counsellor and one or more clients for assisting the client in achieving a defined goal (Shebib, 2014). However, to achieve successful results, a partnership that primarily focuses on the clients’ needs and goals is required. The therapist must be eager to help the clients with care and compassion while the patient also need to perceive and understand their own mental state. Interactions between both sides should be done with trust and respect to ensure the safest environment possible for the client. As therapeutic alliance is the heart in counselling processes, it is significant to acknowledge some of the key components that leads to a successful therapeutic session. This paper will demonstrate how a successful relationship is constructed. It will first explore the emotional and affective component highlighting the bonding of both therapists and client. Agreement on goals between both sides be examined in a detailed method. To finalize the paper, numerous principles will be shown to illustrate the ways therapists should cope if a therapeutic rupture interferes. In order for the client and therapist to form a partnership based on the client’s goal and needs, it is......

Words: 2334 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Creative and Therapeutic

...Unit 12: Creative and Therapeutic activities in health and social care. Introduction I am going to be writing a report about the availability of creative and therapeutic activities for individuals and groups in a health sector or a social care sector. I will be discussing the suitability of the activities I have chosen. Report 1 -Health Care Setting Hospital In a health care setting there are different creative and therapeutic activities that can take place for individuals or a group. The hospital will give individuals or group’s opportunity to take part in an activity or to create something that can help to maintain physical and intellectual ability, improve self esteem and at times aid recovery. Drama is a very creative activity where an individual or a group can take part. Drama involves acting out situations and characters. Drama involves movements, gestures and expressions as well as words. It could be either done by using a script or improvised. Drama can be a way of expressing yourself and also it could be used to build and strengthen relationships. Drama will help the patients to tell their stories and understand the meaning of a situation they may be going through. Drama Exercise is to help maintain a healthy heart and control weight. People from all ages and abilities can participate with exercise that will contribute to health and fitness and even those with very limited mobility. Exercising releases hormones in the brain called endorphin which will......

Words: 1969 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Self Control Procedures Used in Therapeutic Psychology

...Self control procedures used in therapeutic psychology Self control procedures are cognitive and behavioural skills used by individuals to maintain self motivation and achieve personal goals. They are defined by Ruch (1984) as “procedures that involve the growing emphasis on asking people to set up personal systems of rewards and punishments to shape their own thoughts and actions.” The goal of self control procedures is to reduce behavioural deficiencies or behavioural excesses. They help individuals become aware of their own patterns of behaviour and to alter those patterns so that the behaviour will be more or less likely to occur. They are used by people who are dissatisfied with certain aspects of their lives for instance one may feel they smoke too much, exercise to little, or have difficulty controlling anger. Self control procedures include aspects like self monitoring and stimulus control and follow a particular process. Self control procedures are based primarily on the social cognitive theory of Albert Bandura. According to Bandura, ones behaviour is influenced by a variety of factors including one’s own thoughts and beliefs and elements in the environment. Self control procedures are useful for a wide range of concerns including medical, addictions, occupational and psychological. However self control procedures when used in situations where symptoms are severe, should be used in conjunction with other therapies. The self control procedures follow certain......

Words: 939 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Therapeutic Conversation

...appearance was well groomed and attitude was positive in the morning, pt seemed scattered in the afternoon. IV. Therapeutic Techniques and Conversation Analysis – 30 pts. See attached form V. Self as Nurse It was a great day. At this point I like Psych nursing and feel I have found a niche for me, except, I would like to travel and I don’t think psych nursing is in that realm. Once I am done traveling, this is definitely an option for me. Well see! VI. Nursing Process: (Do 3-10 pts. Each) First Nursing Diagnosis: Ineffective individual coping R/T: inadequate level of perception of control Identification of Symptoms: pt stated that she was severely depressed and that she stayed in bed for over a week. CPS removed her child from the home and she had no reason to live and she decided to try suicide. Identifications of Coping Mechanisms: I did not get to visit enough with my pt to identify this, but I can try and assess. Pt was positive at all times. Denial Sublimation Rationalization Are Coping Mechanisms Adaptive of Maladaptive: pt exhibited adaptive behaviors in coping. Pt was always positive and verbalized the counseling was helping. What therapeutic Approaches are being used?: Milieu therapy, group therapy, recreational therapy. Pt seems to do well with structure. Are the Therapeutic Approaches actually therapeutic or not?: It seems that the patient has done well with the structured environment. Second Nursing......

Words: 723 - Pages: 3

Awei (886) | Brazzers - Dayna Vendetta Johnny Sins - FleXXXibility | Jane the Virgin