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TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

Graduate Tracer Study 2011

A Preliminary Report

February 2012

Table of Contents
List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................... ii List of Figures........................................................................................................................................ ii List of Acronyms..................................................................................................................................iiii 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Preface…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….1 Background……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..1 Objectives of the Tracer Study.............................................................................................................. 2 Methodology......................................................................................................................................... 3 Population and Sample Design.............................................................................................................4 Survey Implementation.........................................................................................................................5 Coverage of this Preliminary Report.....................................................................................................5 Graduates' Characteristics....................................................................................................................6 Graduates' Economic Status.................................................................................................................7

10. Graduates' Employment and Work.......................................................................................................8 11. Graduates' Underemployment/Mismatch..........................................................................................11 12. Graduates' Unemployment.................................................................................................................12 13. Conclusion...........................................................................................................................................13 Annex..................................................................................................................................................14 Tables..................................................................................................................................................18

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List of Tables
Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 Comparing Population, Sample and Respondents’ Characteristics Graduates Current Activity with regard to paid work Time Taken to find a job Graduates in Full Time Employment, distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort (%) Distribution of Graduate's Employment by Occupation Distribution of Employed Graduate's by Field of Study and Occupation Graduates' Employment distributed by Sector Employed Graduates requiring at least a degree distributed by Programme of study and Cohort Employed Graduates requiring a degree in the relevant field of Study distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort Distribution of Unemployed graduates by Programme of Study and Cohort Unemployment and Underemployment Rates by Programme of Study

List of Figures
Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Distribution of Respondents by Age and Institution Distribution of Respondents by Year of Graduation Distribution of Respondents by Field of Study (%) Distribution of Respondents Finding Employment in Less Than One Year by Year of Graduation (%) Distribution of Respondents by Reasons for Time gap between Graduation and First Employment (%) ii

Figure 6 Figure 7

Distribution of Respondents by Gender and Sector of Employment (%) Distribution of Respondents by level of Underemployment (%)

List of Acronyms
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. Accounting/Inf Systems Adm/Mgt/HRM Agri Agriculture (spp. Agricultural Ext&Agri. Biotech.&crop prod.) Agriculture (spp. Land & Water Mgt) Agriculture Mgt Agriculture/EVS Avg Biology/EVS Chemical & Env Eng Chemical &Sugar Eng Chemistry/EVS Computer Science/Eng Computer Science/Multi CPE Eng F Horticulture (spp. Plt Biotechnolgy/Soilless Protected culture) Horticulture /Business Mgt HRM HSC IT ICT ISCED Law&Mgt M MGIAccounting with Information Systems Administration/Management/Human Resource Management Agriculture Agriculture with specialisation in Agricultural Extension/Agricultural Biotechnology/Crop Production Agriculture with specialisation in land & water management Agriculture with specialisation in Agricultural Management Agriculture with Environmental Science Average Biology with Environmental Science Chemical and Environment Engineering Chemical and Sugar Engineering Chemistry with Environmental Science Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science with Multimedia Certificate of Primary Education Engineering Female Horticulture with specialization in Plant Biotechnology/ Soilless Protected culture Horticulture with Business Management Human Resource Management Higher School Certificate Information Technology Information and Communication Technology International Standard Classification of Education Law and Management Male Mahatma Gandhi Institute iii

28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45.

Mgt/Mkg Mgt/spp Acc & Fin MPhil NS PGCE PhD PR/Communication Prof Public Adm&Mgt SBMF SC SITE Software Eng SS&Hum SSDT T UoM UTM

-

Management with spec. in Marketing Management specialisation in Accounting & Finance Master in Philosophy Not Specified Post Graduate Certificate in Education Doctor in Philosophy Personal Relations and Communication Professional Public Administration & Management School of Business Management and Finance School Certificate School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering Software Engineering Social Studies and Humanities School of Sustainable Development and Tourism Total University of Mauritius University of Technology, Mauritius

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Preface

Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

The global economy is going through difficult times, as the debt problems of the Euro zone and the aftermath of the financial crisis in the Unites States impact adversely on growth prospects worldwide. Mauritius, having a small and open economy and being highly vulnerable to such external shocks, has started to re-engineer its economy and diversify into new growth poles so as to increase its resilience. This new economic trajectory hinges on the availability of a critical mass of trained professionals, endowed with the right skills, knowledge and expertise to enable enterprises to take advantage of emerging opportunities when the world economy recovers. In this regard, the need to ensure the effectiveness of the higher education and training system in relation to the labour market assumes critical importance. Tracer Studies constitute one form of empirical study for appropriately evaluating the output of the education and training system in relation to the labour market. They bring together certain basic types of information concerning the level of employment, unemployment and underemployment amongst graduates, the contemporary undergraduate experience and the correspondence between educational qualifications and required work skills, amongst others which put into perspective the contribution of the sector. They also provide indications of possible deficits in a given educational programme, such that the latter can be more closely aligned with the needs of the economy. This Preliminary Report is restrictive in scope. It provides only partial information relating to the graduate labour market, pertaining to the level of employment, underemployment and unemployment as well as the extent of mismatch. A more in-depth analysis will be undertaken early in 2012 and will be the subject of another report.

The success of the Mauritian economy is inextricably linked to the quality of its human resources. At a time when the country is undergoing a major restructuration towards services and knowledge-based growth, the need for having a critical mass of professionals to support existing and emerging economic sectors assumes high importance. The country produces between 3,000 to 4,000 degree graduates annually. The key challenge is not just that these graduates are employed, but that their employment best utilises their education. A graduate with a degree in Law, for example, who finds employment as a clerk, is

Background

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

not fully utilising his education. The major concern is not, therefore, about the employability of the graduates but the type of employment they gain and whether they have productive and well-paying jobs. Tracer studies constitute one form of empirical study to appropriately evaluating the outcome of the tertiary education sector. By bringing together certain basic types of information concerning, amongst others, the level of employment, unemployment and underemployment amongst graduates, the correspondence between educational qualifications and employment and the contemporary undergraduate experience they can indicate possible deficits in a given educational programme and assist in better planning at both the institutional and national levels, so that academic provisions are more closely aligned with the needs of the economy. This preliminary report has been specifically prepared within the context of finalizing the List of Indicative Priority Fields of Study (LIPFS) 2012/2013. Owing to time constraint, it is intended to provide only partial information gathered from the tracer study and is, accordingly, restrictive in scope. It gives a snapshot of the current state of the graduate labour market with respect to the level of employment, underemployment and unemployment by field of study as well as the relevance between qualifications and employment, without going into in-depth analysis. This will be the subject of another report. The Graduate Tracer Study 2011 covers the two biggest tertiary education providers in the country namely the University of Mauritius (UoM) and the University of Technology, Mauritius (UTM), which together account for over three quarter of degree graduates produced locally. The output of private institutions and universities overseas has been deliberately omitted from the exercise owing to the absence of a population frame for these groups. Nonetheless, in an endeavour to get a full picture of the state of the graduate labour market, the preliminary findings of this report will be complemented by the Employers’ Survey carried out by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) in 2010 to gauge employers’ demand for graduates as well as projected graduate output for the next 3 years.

Objectives of the Tracer Study

The Graduate Tracer Study 2011 examines the relationship between tertiary education and the world of work. It is based on considerations of the experiences of the UoM and the UTM graduates. The main objectives of the Tracer Study are to a) investigate the transition process from higher education to work; b) shed light on the state of employment, unemployment and underemployment;

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

c) analyse the relationships between higher education and work in a broad perspective which includes the fulfillment of personal goals such as job satisfaction and objective measurement like job position, income, job security and the type of work; d) find out what factors are important for professional success of graduates taking into account personal factors like gender, work motivation, acquired qualification during course of study and labour market conditions. The Study is designed to provide relevant information, both quantitative and qualitative, to educational planners and policy makers to assist them to make informed decisions and fine-tune their strategies, in view of meeting the country’s high-level and skilled human resource needs.

The Study consisted of a mail questionnaire (Annex 1) used in a similar Study undertaken by the TEC in 2007, with some slight amendments brought to treat in a more elaborate manner the contribution of the programme of study to graduates’ current employment. The Survey questionnaire comprised 36 questions, grouped into 3 broad themes as follows: (i) Issues related to the characteristics, socio-economic background and further studies of graduates a. the characteristics and socio-economic background of graduates b. the factors which induce the pursuit of further studies after graduating

Methodology

c. the sources of financing for these further studies and the contribution of employers in graduate academic achievement d. the role played by educational and socio-economic background of graduates in their movement up the educational ladder (ii) Issues related to the labour market experiences of graduates a. the nature and extent of mismatch between graduates’ career expectations and achievements b. The transition from university to the labour market c. the level of employment, unemployment and underemployment among graduates

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

d. the characteristics and nature of the unemployed and underemployed graduates e. nature and conditions of graduate employment f. the occupational and sectoral distribution of graduate employment

g. employment and occupational mobility of graduates h. factors impinging on graduates decisions to change jobs including the influence of educational and socio-economic characteristics on the earnings and career success of graduates i. the extent of job satisfaction among graduates

(iii)

Issues related to the quality of tertiary education provision and their contribution to graduates’ personal development a. the delivery system including the quality of instruction dispensed and the teaching and learning environment b. the extent of inter-disciplinary learning c. the contribution of tertiary education to the knowledge, skills and attitudes of graduates d. the importance of work placement

Population and Sample Design

e. the relevance of programmes to professional requirements

The Survey targeted a random sample of 3,453 full-time degree graduates (1,515 male and 1,938 female) from the UoM (3,103) and the UTM (350), out of a graduate population of 7,188 over the period 2006 to 2010 (Table 1). The sample comprised about 50% of the graduates stratified by cohort and programme, gender and place of residence, from a list obtained from these institutions which provided details of names and addresses of graduates by field and year of graduation, encompassing some 95 programmes.

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The Survey was launched in the third week of July 2011 for the UTM and end of July 2011 for the UoM, with the closing date set for end July 2011 and second week of August 2011 respectively. A questionnaire was sent by post to all the graduates concerned, together with a covering letter and a stamped addressed envelope for return, explaining the objectives of the Study. Follow-up letters were issued to non-respondents eight weeks after the initial mailing, on 12 September 2011. As a result of the first reminder, the response rate, which stood at only 18.5% initially, was increased to 43.6%, representing 20.9% of the population size. At the completion of the fieldwork in September 2011, the final number of returned and useable questionnaires amounted to 1,473, while 32 responses were received through phone calls from parents of graduates who were overseas, giving a total of 1,505 responses in all. The responses were collated, coded, inputted, and analysed in Microsoft Excel. Some data cleaning was necessary where responses received were not clear or were not properly recorded.

Survey Implementation

Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

For the purpose of this preliminary report, 7 questions out of the 36 contained in the questionnaire were processed, namely Questions 1, 2, 8, 9, 18, 19(a), 19 (b) and 20. These questions covered the following aspects: a) b) c) d) e) the name and sex of graduates; the qualifications awarded; the graduate’s current activity with regard to paid work; the time taken to find employment after obtaining the first degree; graduate’s employment history including occupation or post held and minimum qualification required.

Coverage of this Preliminary Report

The answers derived from the above questions would provide an indication of the level of graduates’ employment, unemployment and underemployment by field, as well as the extent of mismatch in terms of the qualifications obtained by graduates and the areas in which they were working.

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Graduates’ Characteristics

Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Table 1 compares the characteristics of the population with that of the sample and the respondents by gender, year of graduation or cohort and faculty/school. A high degree of convergence exists between the respondents and the population characteristics indicating that the responses received were representative of the population. Gender: A total of 1,505 graduates took part in the Survey, including 603 males (40.1%) and 902 females (59.9%). In the population, 57.3% of graduates were female and 42.7% male. Age: The mean age of respondents stood at 25.1 years. A majority (59.6%) was in the age group 21 to 25 years, 39.1% between 26 to 30 years, as shown in Figure 1 below.
Figure 1: Distribution of Respondents by Age and Institution

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 21-25 years Total (%) UoM (%) UTM (%) 59.6 58.9 64.6 26-30 years 39.1 39.9 33.1 31-35 years 1.01 0.9 1.66 36-40 years 0.1 0.1 0 41 years & above 0.2 0.2 0.55

Distribution by Year of Graduation and Field: the composition of the respondents by year of graduation is shown in the pie chart below. As can be observed, the share of respondents tended to increase with time, as follows: 2006- 11.9%; 2007- 17.7%; 2008- 20.0%; 2009- 20.9%; 2010- 29.4%. This corresponded to their population shares of 15.1%, 17.3%, 19%, 21.6% and 26.9% respectively registered over the same period, reflecting the rising trend of enrolment in both institutions in the recent years.

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Figure 2: Distribution of Respondents by Year of Graduation

11.9% 29.4% 17.7%

2006 2007 2008 2009

20.9%

20.3%

2010

Out of the 1,309 (87.0%) and 196 (13.0%) respondents from the UoM and the UTM respectively, the majority from the UoM was from the Faculty of Engineering (22.0%) while the majority of respondents from the UTM was from the School of Business Management and Finance (SBMF) (5.3%). The distribution of the respondents by faculty/school is shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3: Distribution of Respondents by Field of Study (%)

SSDT SITE SBMF UoM/MGI (Joint) Social Studies & Humanities Science Engineering Law & Management Agriculture 0.0
3.1

4.7

5.3 4.9 21.3 14.7 22.0 17.7 6.4

5.0

10.0

15.0

20.0

25.0

According to the survey, 81.8% of respondents were working (Table 2), 79.2% were working fulltime, 2.1% were working part-time but seeking full-time work, 0.3% were working part-time but not seeking full-time work and 0.2% was doing voluntary work. The employment distribution of

Graduates’ Economic Status

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

the graduates by cohort was as follows: 2006- 94.3%; 2007- 89.6%; 2008- 87.6%; 2009- 81.4%; 2010- 68.1%. The findings also revealed that 16.8% of respondents were not working: 5.7% were undertaking further full-time studies either locally (3.8%) or overseas (1.9%), 0.3% were not working and were unavailable for paid work. Some 10.8% of respondents, on the other hand, were not working and were looking for a job. Some 20.6% of respondents from the 2010 cohort were in this category; this higher than average share can be explained by the shorter time lapse between graduation and the conduct of the Study for the 2010 graduates compared to the other cohorts of graduates.

Graduates’ Employment and Work

Time Taken by Graduate to Find a Job
Most companies do not offer employment to new graduates until the final examination results are known. Although it takes quite a while for a graduate to find employment, many start searching for employment way only after graduation. The Study revealed that in general, it took about 2 years for the near-totality of graduates (98.0%) to secure a job, irrespective of the field of study and gender (Table 3). Using the tracer studies of 2007 and 2011, the time gap experienced by respondents between graduation and their first employment over the period 2001 to 2010 is depicted in Figure 4. It is noted that the time taken by graduates to find employment between the two studies had improved. Thus, on average 88.6% of the 2006-2010 graduates found employment within one year of graduation compared to 84.5% of the 2001-2005 graduates.

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Figure 4: Distribution of Respondents Finding Employment in Less Than One Year by Year of Graduation (%)
100.0 90.0 80.0 70.0 60.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 81.8 82.6 81.6 88.9 87.8 90.6 92.0 87.1 82.2 91.0

Some fields of study command a higher demand on the labour market than others. Engineering field is one of these. According to the Study, 97.1% of engineering graduates at the UoM were able to find a job within one year of their graduation as opposed to 91.1% of their counterparts from the Law and Management Faculty, 86.7% from the Faculty of Social Studies and Humanities, 84% from the Faculty of Agriculture and 80.6% from the Faculty of Science. Similarly, at the UTM, 95.2% of School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering (SITE) graduates got a job in less than a year compared to 84.3% of SBMF graduates and 81.7% of School of Sustainable Development and Tourism (SSDT) graduates. A number of reasons were given by respondents for explaining the time gap between their graduation and the first employment, as shown in the figure below:
Figure 5: Distribution of Respondents by Reasons for Time gap between Graduation and First Employment (%)
Financial/economical crisis (recession) Field saturated Job not up to expectation No response from employers Lack of permanent post Unsuitable working hours Unsure of career path Far from residence/transport problems Waiting for final results/graduation Maternity leave/Family commitment Internship/training/pupillage/Bar Vocational Course Time lag between applications and interviews Pursuing further studies Wanted a break after studies Lack of work experience Posts irrelevant/Lack of vacancy 0 0.3 1.2 3.1 6.0 0.9 0.3 1.2 0.7 2.6 0.9 5.6 11.1 7.3 7.5 23.0 34.9 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Graduates’ Current Employment
It was observed that a total of 85.5% of the graduates were engaged in full time employment for the period 2006-2010 (Table 4). The composition of the graduate employment was as follows: 5.6% were from the faculty Agriculture, 25.8% were from Engineering, 19.1% were from Law and Management, 3.8% were from joint UoM/MGI, 12.7% were from Science, 19.9% were from Social Studies and Humanities, 5.3% were from SBMF, 3.1% were from SITE and 4.6% were from SSDT. Some 90.6% of Engineering graduates were in full-time employment as opposed to 75.3% of Agriculture graduates, 84.3% from Law and Management, 56.2% from joint UoM/MGI, 65.2% from Science, 73.8% from Social Studies and Humanities, 83.8% from SBMF, 87.0% from SITE and 72.9% from SSDT. Over three quarter of jobs occupied by the graduates were concentrated in 7 broad groups of occupation, as follows: Teaching (22.7%), Administration/ Management (15.5%), IT profession (11%), Engineering (8.7%), Accounting (5.3%, Banking and Finance (4.8%) and Clerical (7.5%). Other occupations held by respondents related to Technician (3.6%), Marketing (3.6%) and Public Relations/ Communication (2.8%), amongst others (Tables 5 and 6). Teaching constituted the single biggest source of employment for graduates from the faculties of Science (51%) and joint UoM/MGI (67.4%) and to a lesser extent Agriculture (17.5%). However, the trend with regard to graduate employment in teaching is taking a declining trend (2006- 26.9%, 2007- 29.8%, 2008- 23.3%, 2009- 19.1% and 2010- 17.6%).

Sector of Employment
The findings revealed that over the period 2006-2010, 74.0% of graduates were employed in private institutions (Table 7) and 24.7% in public institutions, compared with 59.2% and 39.6% respectively for the period 2001-2005. The private sector thus consolidated its position as the biggest provider of employment for graduates, while the public sector is slowly losing its hegemony. There has not been any significant improvement to graduates’ self-employment which stood at 1.4% over 2006-2010 compared with 1.1% over 2001-2005. Lack of initial capital to start own business, lack of confidence and risk taking to venture into self employment and general parents’ expectation to be supported after they have done their part in educating their children may be compelling reasons for the new graduates to seek a secured job as opposed to create their own business.

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Figure 6: Distribution of Respondents by Gender and Sector of Employment (%)

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Male Female Total Public 9.2 16.6 13.4 Parastatal 10.3 11.5 11 Local Authority 0 0.5 0.3 Private 79 70.2 74 Self-employed 1.5 1.3 1.4

Graduates’ Underemployment/Mismatch

Table 8 assesses the level of graduate underemployment by programme of study by examining the minimum qualifications required by graduates in their current employment. Overall, 23.1% of respondents were found to be underemployed as their jobs required less than a degree. The level of underemployment varied by faculty/school; the highest rate being witnessed by SSDT graduates (60.9%) followed by SBMF (41.8%), Joint UoM/MGI graduates (40%), Agriculture graduates (39%), Social Studies and Humanities graduates (28.6%), Law & Management graduates (20.4%). Engineering (8.8%) and Science (16.8%) graduates, on the other hand, were the least affected. The level of underemployment, as expected, was lower amongst the earlier than latter cohorts as follows: 2006- 14.3%; 2007- 17.8%; 2008- 20.2%; 2009- 26.6%; and 201031.7%, indicating that with time many of the graduates who are underemployed ended up being fully employed in the sense of finding a job which requires at least a degree. Table 9 gives the graduates’ underemployment rate by programme of study and cohort. As can be observed, the underemployment level affected certain groups of graduates more, in particular those who had studied Agriculture, Hindi and Indian Philosophy, Management, Joint Economics Degrees (with Management or Accounting), Banking and International Finance, Human Resource Management, History, Political Science as well as Tourism and Hospitality Management, amongst others.

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Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

Figure 7: Distribution of Respondents by level of Underemployment (%)

SSDT SITE SBMF SS&Hum Science MGI Law&Mgt Engineering Agriculture 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 8.8 39.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 20.4 16.8 40.0 28.6 18.2 41.8

60.9

70.0

Graduates’ Unemployment

The graduate unemployment rate has been calculated as the number of graduates not working and looking for a job over the total number of economically active graduates (defined as the total graduate population excluding those on full-time studies and those not working and not looking for a job). As per this definition, the graduate unemployment rate stood at 11.7%. As expected, the unemployment rate was higher amongst female (13.5%) than male (6.6%) and decreased with time, as the following distribution of unemployed graduates by cohort shows 2006-1.8%; 2007- 5.5%; 2008 - 7.4%, 2009 - 11.5% and 2010 - 23.2%. Table 10 gives the distribution of unemployed graduates by faculty/school, programme of study and cohort. The highest unemployment rate was experienced by joint UoM/MGI graduates (30.9%) followed by those from Agriculture (17%), Social Studies & Humanities (16.8%), Science (15.5%), SSDT (12.9%), SBMF (9.3%), SITE (8.7%), Law & Management (7.2%) and Engineering (3.5%). High unemployment rate were experienced by graduates in Agriculture, Psychology, History, Hindi, Indian Philosophy and Political Science, amongst others. Table 11 summarises the unemployment and underemployment rates amongst the graduates.

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Conclusion

Graduate Tracer Study 2011- A Preliminary Report in view of Updating the LIPFS

The report has put into perspective the level of underemployment and unemployment amongst graduates as well as the extent of mismatch between their qualifications and employment. The findings provide ample data to assist in finalizing the LIPFS, though the latter includes only 35 out of 95 programmes surveyed by the tracer study. On the whole, the 2010 graduate cohort seems the most affected in every respect and justifiably so given the shorter time lapse between their graduation and the conduct of this study compared to the other cohorts. Similarly, some graduates, like those in Agriculture, tend to be most affected than others owing to their fields of study not being in much demand. The higher unemployment and underemployment rates prevailing for those graduates cannot be attributed to any single reason, however, though some transitional factors would tend to affect them all, notwithstanding the current present global recession which is likely to impact adversely on the employment situation at home.

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TERTIARY EDUCATION COMMISSION GRADUATE TRACER STUDY 2011

Annex 1

Dear Graduate, The Tertiary Education Commission(TEC), in collaboration with the University of Mauritius (UoM) and the University of Technology,Mauritius (UTM), is undertaking a study regarding the type of work, further study or other activity you are/were involved in since you completed your first degree programme. The information requested will assist us in planning future educational needs. Results of this study will only be presented in summary form and individual responses will be kept "strictly confidential". We would, highly appreciate it if you could kindly complete the questionnaire and return it to the TEC (address below). Thank you for your collaboration .

A. General
1. Surname: ………………………………………Forename(s):………………………Maiden Name(If applicable):…………… 2. Sex : Male Female Not Married None Father Mother 6. Father's occupation: ………………………. 7. No. of Mother's occupation: …...….....………………...………………… Sister(s) :…..…...…………………………………….. Primary Secondary Tertiary 3. Age :

4.Marital Status:Married 5. Level up to which your parents have studied :

Brother(s):…………………………………………

B. Educational
8. Full Title of degree and Year awarded:..…….…..….…..……….………………………………………………………… 9. Please state class of degree conferred: 1st 2:1 2:2 3rd

10. Please state (if any) area of specialisation:…...….……...………………………………………………………………. 11. Do you possess other tertiary-level qualification? Yes If yes, please give details below: Title of Award (in full) Institution(s) Period enrolled From To Attendance FT/PT/DE* Source of funding No

*FT = Full-time, PT =Part-time, DE= Distance Education

C. Further Study
12. Are you currently undertaking further studies? Yes No

13. If No, skip to question 14. If yes, please give details as follows: Title of Programme(in full) Institution(s) Period enrolled From To

Attendance FT/PT/C/DE*

Source of funding

*FT = Full-time, PT =Part-time, C= Correspondence and DE= Distance Education
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14 (a).Do you intend to upgrade your qualification in the future?

Yes

No

If Yes (a) Kindly mention any constraint (if any) that is preventing you from pursuing further studies presently? ....……..……….………………………………………………………………………………………………… ....……..……….………………………………………………………………………………………………… ....……..……….………………………………………………………………………………………………… ....……..……….………………………………………………………………………………………………… (b) What Mode of study would you prefer? Full Time Part Time Distance Education 15. If you are currently studying or are planning to pursue further studies, up to what level do you plan to study? Masters PhD PostDoctoral Others (please specify):...….….....……………………

16. Could you please state the main reason why you want to pursue further studies? .………………………..………………………………………………..………………………….…………… .………………………..………………………………………………..………………………….…………… .………………………..………………………………………………..………………………….…………… .………………………..………………………………………………..………………………….…………… .………………………..………………………………………………..………………………….……………

D. Activity
17. What type of jobs were you contemplating when you decided to do your degree at the UoM/UTM? …………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18. Which one of the following best describes your current activity with regard to paid work? Working full-time Working part-time but seeking full-time work Working part-time but not seeking full-time work Working on Contractual basis Self - employed Not working and looking for a job Not working and unavailable for paid work Studying Full-Time Others, please specify: ....……….………………………………………………………………………..

E. Employment History
19(a) How long did it take to find employment after obtaining your first degree? …………………… mths

(b) Is there any specific reason(s) for the time gap between obtaining your degree and your first employment. …………………..……………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………..……………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………..……………………………………………………………………………………………… 20. Employment history (since obtaining first degree to-date): Name of Employer* Period employed From 1 2 3 4 * If self-employed, please state area of activity
15

Post held/Job Title

Minimum Qualification required

Reasons for leaving job (where applicable)

To

F. Current Employment
21. How did you come to know about your current job? Internal Promotion Newspaper advertisement Vacancy notice Internet Private Networking Employment Service Job Fair Other(please specify) …..…………...…………………………………………………………………….

22. Any specific attributes required for the job:…………….… .…….....……………………………………………………………. 23. Gross monthly salary (to the nearest '000') (Rs/month):………………………………… 24. Please list any other benefits attached to the job: …………………………….…..…………...……………………………………………………………………. …………………………….…..…………...……………………………………………………………………. …………………………….…..…………...……………………………………………………………………. 25. Location of place of work: ………………………………… 26. Number of employees (approximately) Less than 10 11 to 50 27. Nature of work performed (in brief): District: …………………………………

51 to 200 over 200

28. Do you face any major problem related to your job? If yes, please elaborate:

Yes

No

29. If you are self-employed, is there any reason for your choice?

30. How would you rate the contribution of your programme of study at the UoM/UTM, relating to: (Tick as appropriate) Organisational Skills Problem solving Leadership skills Ability to work independently Creativity/Creative thinking Negociating skills Team work/Team orientation Time management Initiative/Risk taking Writing skills Communication Skills/Interpersonal skills Computer Skills Job Specific skills Technical Knowledge Decision-making Entrepreneurship skills Ability to work under pressure
Very high High Medium Low Very Low

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31. How relevant was your programme of study at the UoM/UTM to your present job? Very much Much A little Not at all

32. Which of the following represent strengths and weaknesses of the UoM/UTM programme that you attended? (Tick as appropriate) Strength Weakness Does not apply ♦ Range of modules offered ♦ Number of optional modules in relation to the number of compulsory (core) modules ♦ Student workload ♦ Teaching Quality ♦ Inter-disciplinary learning ♦ Facilities ♦ Research Capacity ♦ Labor Market relevance/labor market adaptability ♦ Industry Linkages ♦ Cost ♦ Other strengths/weaknesses(pl. specify): ……………….……………………………………….. 33. Any other strengths/weaknesses concerning your programme of study at the UoM/UTM not covered above, you want to mention? ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. 34. How satisfied are you with your current job? Very much Much A little Not at all

35. Do you intend to stay in the same job/profession? Yes No

If no, why? ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. 36. Any other comments concerning your experience at the UoM/UTM: ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. ………….………………………...……………………………………………………………………. Please return completed questionnaire to:

The Head, Research & Planning Division, Tertiary Education Commission Reduit

17

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011- Graduates' Characteristics

Table 1: COMPARING POPULATION, SAMPLE AND RESPONDENTS' CHARACTERISTICS
SHARE OF RESPONDENTS IN POPULATION (% Share) (C/A) SHARE OF RESPONDENTS IN SAMPLE (% Share) (C/B)

POPULATION No. (A) GENDER Male Female Total 3067 4121 7188 42.7 57.3 100 1515 1938 3453 (% Share) No. (B)

SAMPLE

RESPONDENTS No. (C)

(% Share)

(% Share)

43.9 56.1 100

603 902 1505

40.1 59.9 100

19.66 21.89 20.94

39.8 46.5 43.6

YEAR OF GRADUATION 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 1088 1245 1369 1550 1936 15.1 17.3 19.0 21.6 26.9 543 700 779 686 745 15.7 20.3 22.6 19.9 21.6 179 267 301 315 443 11.9 17.7 20.0 20.9 29.4 16.5 21.4 22.0 20.3 22.9 33.0 38.1 38.6 45.9 59.5

INSTITUTION/FACULTY/SCHOOL University of Mauritius (UoM) Agriculture
Law & Management Engineering

6488 319 2005 1850 751 1333 230 700 251 213 236

90.3 4.4 27.9 25.7 10.4 18.5 3.2 9.7 3.5 3.0 3.3

3103 192 773 877 431 699 131 350 126 107 118

89.9 5.6 22.4 25.4 12.5 20.2 3.8 10.1 3.6 3.1 3.4

1309 97 267 331 221 320 73 196 80 46 70

87.0 6.4 17.7 22.0 14.7 21.3 4.9 13.0 5.3 3.1 4.7

20.2 30.4 13.3 17.9 29.4 24.0 31.7 28.0 31.9 21.6 29.7

42.2 50.5 34.5 37.7 51.3 45.8 55.7 56.0 63.5 43.0 59.3

Science Social Studies & Humanities UoM/MGI (Joint) University of Technology,Mauritius (UTM) SBMF SITE SSDT

18

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011- Graduates' Labour Market Experiences

Table 2: Graduates Current Activity with regard to paid work
UoM UoM & UTM No. Current position WORKING Working full-time (inc. working on contractual basis and self-employed) Working part-time but seeking full-time work 1231 81.8 % Gender M % 86.7 F % 77.6 M % 85.5 UoM F % 78.4 M % 93 UTM F % 79.2 Agri % 75.3 Eng % 92.1 Law & Mgt % 87.6 Faculty MGI % 64.4 Science % 70.1 SS & Hum % 77.5 Total No. 1062 % 81.1 SBMF % 87.5 SITE % 91.3 UTM School SSDT % 81.4 Total No. 169 % 86.2 2006 % 94.3 2007 % 89.6 Cohort 2008 % 87.6 2009 % 81.4 2010 % 68.1

1192

79.2

84.6

74.7

83.9

75.6

88.0

76.0

75.3

91.2

85.8

57.5

66.1

74.7

1031

78.8

86.3

87

74.3

161

82.1

93.1

88.8

84.9

76.9

65.2

31

2.1

1.5

2.4

1.2

2.4

3.0

3.1

-

0.9

1.5

6.8

3.2

1.9

25

1.9

1.3

4.35

4.3

6

3.1

1.1

0.7

2.3

3.5

2.0

Working part-time but not seeking full-time work

5

0.3

0.7

0.1

0.4

0.1

2.0

-

-

-

0.4

-

-

0.6

3

0.2

-

-

2.9

2

1.0

-

-

-

0.6

0.7

Voluntary Work

3

0.2

-

0.3

-

0.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.9

0.3

3

0.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.3

0.3

0.2

NOT WORKING Not working and looking for a job Not working and unavailable for paid work Studying Full Time Studying Abroad OTHERS NS Total
NS-Not Specified

253

16.8

11.9

20.1

13.1

20.3

6

17.7

21.6

6.9

12.0

30.1

29.0

21.3

230

17.6

10

8.7

15.7

23

11.7

5.1

9.3

12.4

16

29.9

162

10.8

6.6

13.5

6.8

13.5

6.0

13.5

15.5

3.3

6.7

28.8

12.7

15.6

143

10.9

8.8

8.7

11.4

19

9.7

1.7

5.2

7.0

10.6

20.6

5 57 29 21 21

0.3 3.8 1.9 1.4 1.4 100

0.3 3.2 1.8 1.3 1.3 100

0.3 4.2 2.0 1.4 1.4 100

0.4 3.8 2.2 1.4 1.4 100

0.2 4.6 2.0 1.2 1.2 100

1 1.0 100

1.0 1.0 2.1 3.1 3.1 100

1.0 4.1 1.0 3.1 3.1 100

1.5 2.1 0.9 0.9 100

3.4 1.9 0.4 0.4 100

1.4 5.5 5.5 100

1.4 12.2 2.7 0.9 0.9 100

3.4 2.2 1.25 1.3 100

4 56 27 17 17

0.3 4.3 2.1 1.3 1.3 100

1.3 2.5 2.5 100

100

1.4 2.9 2.9 2.9 100

1 1 2 4 4

0.5 0.5 1.0 2.0 2.0 100

1.1 2.3 0.6 0.6 100

2.2 1.9 1.1 1.1 100

0.7 2.3 2.3 100

0.3 3.8 1.3 2.6 2.6 100

0.5 6.8 2.0 2.0 2.0 100

1505

1309

196

19

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011 - Graduates' Labour Market Experiences

Table 3: Time Taken to find a job
UoM & UTM Total No. Time Taken Less than 1 mth Less than 3 mths Less than 6 mths Less than 12 mths Less than 2 yrs 237 18.2 % M % 20.3 Gender F % 16.7 M % 20.7 UoM F % 17.5 M % 18.5 UTM F % 10.0 Agri % 6.2 UoM Faculty Eng Law & Mgt MGI % 27.5 % 25.5 % Science SS & Hum % 11.8 % 14.8 Total No. 212 % 18.8 SBMF % 7.1 SITE % 28.6 UTM School SSDT % 13.3 No. 25 Total % 14.5 2006 % 21.3 2007 % 19.9 Cohort 2008 % 21.5 2009 % 14.6 2010 % 16.3

596

45.8

52.5

41.1

51.7

41.9

56.5

33.8

25.9

64.1

54.7

9.1

32.9

38.5

517

45.8

44.3

71.4

30.0

79

45.9

51.9

52.6

45.6

43.8

40.4

880

67.6

75.8

61.8

75.5

62.4

77.2

57.5

49.4

85.0

74.5

43.6

53.5

60.7

763

67.6

68.6

88.1

53.3

117

68.0

70.0

75.7

64.8

64.4

66.0

1148

88.2

92.2

85.4

92.2

86.2

92.4

78.8

84.0

97.1

91.1

70.9

80.6

86.7

1000

88.6

84.3

95.2

81.7

148

86.0

90.6

92.0

87.0

82.2

91.0

1276

98.1

99.1

97.2

98.9

97.2

100

97.5

96.3

99.7

97.2

94.5

98.2

97.4

1106

97.9

100

100

96.7

170

98.8

96.9

97.6

96.7

98.6

100.0

More than 2 yrs

1301

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

1129

100

100

100

100

172

100

100

100

100

100

-

20

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011 - Graduates' Labour Market Experiences

Table 4: Graduates* in Full Time Employment, distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort (%)
2006
Field of Study Accounting (minor Finance) Accounting minor Information Systems Accounting with Business Accounting with Finance Accounting with Information Systems Agricultural Biotechnology Agriculture sp Agribusiness Agriculture sp Aquaculture Agriculture sp Organic Farming Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Agriscience & Technology Banking & International Finance Biology Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Biology minor Environmental Protection Biology minor Environmental Studies Business Economics with Information Systems Business Informatics Business Information Systems Chemical & Environmental Chemical & Renewable Energy Chemistry Chemistry with Business Mgt Civil Engineering Computer Science & Eng Computer Science with Multimedia Computer Science with Network security Economics Economics with Accounting Economics with Management Economics& Finance Electrical & Communication Electrical & Electronic Electronics&Communication Electronics&Computer Science English Finance Finance (Minor:Law) Finance with Law Fine Arts Food Science & Technology Food Science with Home Economics Food Science with Nutrition French Hindi History with Heritage Studies History with International Relations History with Social Studies HRM ICT Indian Philosophy Information Systems Information Technology Information Technology Enabled Services Joint Humanities Law % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 75.0

2007
% 100 100 80.0 100 100 85.7 90.0 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 87.5 80.0 100 100 100 33.3 100 80.0 100 77.8 100 83.3 100 100

2008
% 100 100 100 100 100 100 90 89 100 100 100 67 63 88 100 100 50 100 100 100 100 100 88 83 100 100 86 100 67 86 25 100 100 67 83 83 100

2009
% 100 66.7 100 87.5 100 80.0 100 100 75.0 80.0 100 100 71.4 100 100 100 100 100 66.7 100 100 100 33.3 80.0 100 100 66.7 100.0 25.0 75.0 66.7 60.0 95.5 100 90.0 100 33.3 50.0 60.0

2010
% 87.5 50.0 55.6 25.0 42.9 80.0 80.0 80.0 80.0 87.5 71.4 80.0 100 50.0 42.9 37.5 42.9 84.6 100 42.9 60.0 100 77.8 100.0

Total
% 94.1 100 80.0 100 95.0 73.7 81.8 69.2 100 100 66.7 93.1 81.1 100 0.0 100 90.0 100 100 93.1 100 81.8 100 96.4 100 100 100 88.2 100 100 92.3 100 96.4 100 100 80.0 84.6 100 100 87.5 100 90.0 100 82.4 66.7 0.0 66.7 52.4 89.6 100 62.5 89.7 92.0 66.7 79.2 83.3

(cont. 21)

Table 4: Graduates* in Full Time Employment, distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort (%) (cont.)
2006
Field of Study
Law&Mgt Management Manufacturing Marathi Marine Science & Tech Mathematics Mathematics with Computer Science Mechanical Mechatronics Medical science Medicine Mgt with Finance Mgt with Information Systems Mkg Mgt Molecular Biology Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Physics Physics with Computing Physics with Electronics Physiotherapy Political Science Production & Operations Mgt Psychology Public Adm&Mgt Social Science with sp. Political Science Social Science with sp. Psychology Social Science with sp. Sociology Social Work Sociology Software Eng Statistics with Computer Science Statistics with Economics Tamil Telegu Textile &Fashion Design Tourism&Hospitality Mgt Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt Urdu

2007
%
100 90.9 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 80.0 100 100 100 100 100 71.4 -

2008
%
100 78 100 100 100 100 100 83 100 100 100 43 75 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 80 100 -

2009
%
100 100 100 100 100 80.0 100 100 66.7 100 50.0 66.7 66.7 100 100 40.0 100 80.0 100 100 100 100 57.1 91.7 75.0 60.0

2010
%
85.7 81.0 50.0 37.5 80.0 75.0 83.3 100 100 100 100 100 71.4 100 0.0 57.1 50.0 100 33.3 71.4 100 100 100 100 73.9 36.4

Total
%
95.5 84.6 100 50.0 37.5 92.6 88.9 95.8 95.2 100 100 100 86.7 100 100 63.6 76.5 88.9 72.7 56.3 53.3 100 44.4 100 100 81.8 88.9 80.0 86.7 94.4 100 100 0.0 100 88.9 82.4 75.0 43.8

%
100 85.7 100 75.0 100 100 100 100 100 100 80.0 100 83.3 100 100 -

Total

97.0

93.7

89.8

83.6

73.5

85.5

22

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011- Graduates' Labour Market Experiences
Table 5 : Distribution of Graduate's Employment by Occupation
UoM & UTM Total No. Current Occupation Accounting Adm/Mgt/HRM Banking/Finance Clerk IT Professional Textile/Fashion Designer Engineer Law/Legal Marketing Medical & Health Related Research Officer/ Assistant Scientific Officer/Lab Assistant Teacher/Lecturer Technician Agricultural Officer Social Worker PR/Communication Environmental Officer Other Professional Consultant Quality Officer Programme/Project Officer Trainee Total 60 174 54 84 124 11 98 10 40 29 11 8 255 0.7 0.8 0.6 1.0 0.7 0.7 4.2 8 0.8 0.7 0.4 0.9 1.5 5.3 15.5 4.8 7.5 11.0 1.0 8.7 0.9 3.6 2.6 1.0 % Gender M % 5.4 15.8 4.4 4.0 14.8 0.4 15.6 0.4 5.4 2.1 1.0 F % 5.3 15.3 5.1 10.1 8.3 1.4 3.6 1.2 2.2 3.0 0.9 M % 5.5 14.0 3.7 4.2 13.2 0.5 18.7 0.5 5.0 1.0 1.2 UoM F % 5.2 13.7 5.0 9.2 8.3 1.6 4.0 1.4 2.3 2.3 1.0 M % 5.0 25.0 7.5 2.5 22.5 7.5 7.5 UTM F % 6.0 28.4 6.0 17.9 7.5 1.5 9.0 Agri % 1.6 7.9 6.3 11.1 4.8 Eng % 0.7 7.6 1.7 32.4 3.8 33.4 1.0 0.7 Law & Mgt % 18.2 30.4 9.8 9.8 1.4 0.5 4.7 5.1 UoM Faculty MGI % 2.3 2.3 18.6 2.3 4.7 Science % 0.7 7.7 1.4 3.5 2.1 5.6 9.8 0.7 SS & Hum % 3.6 13.9 9.4 12.1 1.8 0.4 2.2 Total No. 52 135 44 70 101 11 98 10 33 17 11 % 5.3 13.8 4.5 7.2 10.3 1.1 10.0 1.0 3.4 1.7 1.1 UTM School Cohort Total No. 8 39 10 14 23 % 5.4 26.5 6.8 9.5 15.6 7 12 4.8 8.2 2006 % 4.1 11.7 2.1 4.8 14.5 1.4 14.5 2.1 2.8 1.4 0.7 2007 % 6.7 13.8 5.8 7.6 8.4 1.3 8.4 1.3 2.7 1.3 0.4 2008 % 5.4 14.6 7.5 7.5 12.9 0.4 7.9 0.8 2.9 2.5 0.8 2009 % 5.1 18.3 5.1 10.2 11.5 0.9 8.1 0.4 3.4 1.7 1.3 2010 % 5.1 17.3 2.9 5.9 9.2 1.1 7.4 0.4 5.5 4.8 1.5

SBMF
% 6.7 36.7 10.0 16.7 6.7 -

SITE
% 2.9 8.6 2.9 2.9 62.9 -

SSDT
% 5.8 26.9 5.8 5.8 1.9 5.8 23.1 -

22.7 3.6 0.2 0.9 2.8 0.5 2.0 1.4 0.9 0.4 2.0 100

16.8 3.5 0.2 0.4 2.3 0.4 2.1 1.2 0.8 0.6 1.5 100

27.1 3.6 0.2 1.2 3.1 0.6 2.0 1.6 0.9 0.2 2.5 100

18.2 4.2 0.2 0.5 1.5 0.5 2.5 1.5 0.7 0.5 1.0 100

28.7 4.0 0.2 1.4 2.8 0.7 2.3 1.7 1.0 0.2 2.3 100

10.0 6.3 1.3 1.3 3.8 100

13.4 6.0 4.5 100

17.5 22.2 3.2 1.6 1.6 3.2 6.3 7.9 4.8 100

7.9 3.4 0.7 1.0 2.8 1.0 0.7 0.3

8.9 0.5 0.9 2.8 3.3 0.5 3.3

67.4 2.3 -

51.0 9.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7

37.2 0.9 4.0 6.7 0.0 1.8 2.2 0.9 2.7 100

238 40 2 10 22 6 23 16 9 3 17

24.4 4.1 0.2 1.0 2.3 0.6 2.4 1.6 0.9 0.3 1.7 100

1.7 11.7 1.7 8.3 100

14.3 2.9 2.9

21.2 1.9 1.9

17

11.6 -

26.9 3.4 1.4 2.1 2.1 1.4 1.4 0.7 100

29.8 3.6 0.9 0.9 2.2 0.4 1.8 0.4 0.9 0.9 100

23.3 4.2 0.8 1.7 0.4 2.1 2.5 0.8 0.4 0.4 100

19.1 4.7 1.3 2.1 0.4 1.3 0.4 0.9 0.4 2.6 100

17.6 2.2 0.4 5.1 1.1 2.9 2.2 0.7 0.7 4.4 100

40 2 10 31 6 23 16 10 4 23

9

6.1 -

1 1 6

0.7 0.7 4.1 100

1123

100

100

100

100

976

100

100

147

23

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011- Graduates' Labour Market Experiences

Table 6: Distribution of Employed Graduate's by Field of Study and Occupation
Fields of Study UNIVERSITY OF MAURITIUS Agriculture Agricultural Biotechnology Agriculture sp Agribusiness Agriculture sp Aquaculture Agriculture sp Organic Farming Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Agriscience & Technology Food Science & Technology Food Science with Home Economics Food Science with Nutrition Total No. 1 % 5.3 1.6 12.5 0.7 2.4 3.7 18.2 31.3 60.0 25.0 38.9 18.2 57.1 23.5 13.3 5.6 7.9 18.2 15.4 11.1 2.3 6.7 0.7 4.8 3.6 5.6 7.1 11.1 9.1 8.3 11.1 11.1 2 % 13.8 7.9 9.1 12.5 12.5 14.3 14.3 7.6 12.5 13.6 8.0 2.4 3.8 5.3 3.7 8.0 19.0 5.6 44.4 4.2 30.4 25.0 20.0 50.0 22.2 22.7 14.3 41.2 91.7 13.3 33.3 23.7 36.4 30.8 22.2 33.3 2.3 12.5 7.7 3.2 3.8 100.0 33.3 18.8 50.0 100.0 11.1 14.3 13.9 38.9 21.4 9.1 25.0 4.8 3.8 22.2 8.3 5.6 33.3 22.2 42.9 11.1 3 % 4.5 9.8 12.5 16.7 13.6 28.6 17.6 6.7 5.3 27.3 15.4 1.4 9.5 9.4 11.1 14.3 22.2 27.3 25.0 11.1 44.4 33.3 4 % 7.2 6.3 9.1 12.5 12.5 16.7 1.7 4.5 7.4 4.0 5.6 9.8 5.6 22.7 11.1 18.4 9.1 23.1 22.2 18.6 33.3 33.3 3.5 6.5 4.8 6.3 9.1 12.1 22.2 14.3 44.4 12.5 4.8 7.7 22.2 25.0 5.6 25.0 33.3 11.1 33.3 5 % 10.3 32.4 25.0 88.1 33.3 28.6 50.0 63.2 63.0 68.0 5.6 1.4 5.6 2.6 7.7 2.3 12.5 2.1 18.8 6 % 1.1 3.8 45.8 7 % 10.0 33.4 31.8 50.0 92.0 100.0 92.3 57.1 20.0 3.7 4.0 76.2 72.2 22.2 8.3 0.5 2.6 8 % 1.0 4.7 46.7 16.7 9 % 3.4 11 18 13 14 17 14 17 1 4.5 8.3 5.1 5.9 13 7.7 22 22 5.6 6.5 12 33 4.8 9.1 1.8 9.1 17 11 7.7 10 % 1.7 0.7 9.1 9.8 9.7 50 14 82 0.4 17 11 % 1.1 4.8 14.3 14.3 16.7 4.7 6.7 12.5 0.7 6.3 2.2 9.1 11.1 50.0 16.7 12 % 0.8 0.7 4.5 5.3 4.2 6.5 11.5 33.3 13 % 24.4 17.5 9.1 12.5 12.5 16.7 42.9 57.1 7.9 12.5 4.8 3.8 20.0 10.5 7.4 12.0 4.8 5.6 33.3 8.9 31.3 25.0 11.1 4.5 13.3 11.1 7.9 33.3 67.4 87.5 46.7 66.7 100.0 100.0 100.0 75.0 51.0 45.2 33.3 42.3 76.2 43.8 91.7 88.9 71.4 37.2 11.1 28.6 11.1 18.2 4.2 81.0 73.1 11.1 41.7 77.8 16.7 16.7 33.3 57.1 46.2 22.2 14 % 4.1 22.2 36.4 25.0 25.0 33.3 57.1 14.3 3.4 12.5 18.2 100.0 5.6 22.2 0.5 4.5 9.1 12.9 33.3 26.9 8.3 0.9 5.6 16.7 15 % 0.2 3.2 33.3 16.7 16 % 1.0 1.6 12.5 4.0 8.3 25.0 33.3 25.0 23.1 17 % 2.3 1.6 17 0.7 13 10 0.9 4.5 11 2.3 6.7 0.7 3.2 6.7 11 4.2 9.5 15 8.3 5.6 17 17 50 7.7 18 % 0.6 3.2 13 17 1 9.1 50 0.7 3.2 19 % 2.4 6.3 9.1 12.5 14.3 16.7 2.8 25.0 33.3 14.3 5.3 3.7 4.0 11.1 2.8 4.5 5.9 6.7 5.6 2.6 11.1 0.7 33.3 1.8 5.6 4.2 7.7 33.3 20 % 1.6 1.0 2.4 7.4 3.3 20.0 16.7 5.3 9.1 0.7 6.3 2.2 5.6 7.1 18.2 4.2 21 % 0.9 7.9 13 14 14 33 0.7 4.5 33 0.5 2.6 0.7 3.2 22.0 % 0.3 0.3 5.3 0.9 25.0 7.7 23 % 1.7 4.8 9.1 33 17 3.3 4.5 5.9 8.3 7.9 11 0.7 3.8 2.7 7.1 13 11 8.3 Total % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 (cont. 24)

976 63
11 8 8 3 7 6 7 7 6

Engineering
Business Informatics Chemical & Environmental Chemical & Renewable Energy Civil Engineering Computer Science & Eng Computer Science with Multimedia Electrical & Communication Electrical & Electronic Electronics&Communication Electronics&Computer Science ICT Information Systems Information Technology Manufacturing Mechanical Mechatronics Production & Operations Mgt Textile &Fashion Design

290
8 22 2 25 42 3 1 26 7 10 19 27 25 1 21 18 9 24

Law&Management
Accounting (minor Finance) ccou t g o o at o Systems Accounting with Finance Accounting with Information Systems Finance Finance (Minor:Law) Finance with Law HRM Law Law&Mgt Management Mgt with Finance Mgt with Information Systems Mkg Mgt Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt

214
16 5 4 18 22 7 17 12 15 18 38 11 13 9 9

Mahatma Gandhi Institute
Fine Arts Hindi Indian Philosophy Marathi Tamil Telegu Urdu

43
8 15 9 1 1 1 8

Science
Biology Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Chemistry Chemistry with Business Mgt Marine Science & Tech Mathematics Mathematics with Computer Science Medical science Molecular Biology Physics Physics with Computing Physics with Electronics Physiotherapy

143
31 3 26 1 3 21 16 2 1 12 9 7 11

Social Studies &Humanities
Business Economics with Information Systems Economics Economics with Accounting Economics with Management Economics& Finance English French History with International Relations History with Social Studies Joint Humanities Political Science Psychology Social Science with sp. Political Science Social Science with sp. Psychology Social Science with sp. Sociology Social Work Sociology Statistics with Computer Science Statistics with Economics

223
18 14 9 11 24 21 26 9 12 18 6 4 6 9 7 4 13 9 3

Table 6: Distribution of Employed Graduate's by Field of Study and Occupation
Fields of Study Total No. 1 % 5.4 2 % 26.5 3 % 6.8 4 % 9.5 5 % 15.6 6 % 7 % 8 % 9 % 4.8 10 % 8.2 11 % 12 % 13 % 11.6 14 % 15 % 16 % 17 % 6.1 18 % 19 % 20 % 21 % 0.7 22.0 % 0.7 23 % 4.1 Total % 100

UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY,MAURITIUS School of Business Management and Finance
Accounting with Business Banking & International Finance HRM Public Adm&Mgt

147

60
4 25 27 4

6.7 50.0 8.0 -

36.7 25.0 12.0 59.3 50.0

10.0 20.0 3.7 -

16.7 32.0 3.7 25.0

-

-

-

-

6.7 4 7.4 25

-

-

-

1.7 25.0 -

-

-

-

12 12 15 -

-

-

-

1.7 4 -

-

8.3 8 11 -

100 100 100 100 100

School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering
Business Information Systems Computer Science with Network security Information Technology Enabled Services Mathematics Software Eng

35
6 5 7 3 14

2.9 16.7 -

8.6 42.9 -

2.9 14.3 -

2.9 14.3 -

62.9 66.7 80.0 14.3 92.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14.3 20.0 14.3 66.7 7.1

-

-

-

2.9 33 -

-

-

-

-

2.9 16.7 -

-

100 100 100 100 100 100

School of Sustainable Development and Technologies
Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Tourism&Hospitality Mgt

52
13 39

5.8 7.7 5.3

26.9 35.9 15.5

5.8 7.7 4.8

5.8 7.7 5.1 7.5

1.9 2.6 11.0

1.0

8.7

0.9

5.8 7.7 3.6

23 92 2.6

1.0

0.7

21.2 28.2 22.7

3.6

0.2

0.9

1.9 2.6 2.8

0.5

2.0

1.4

0.9

0.4

1.9 2.6 2

100 100 100 100

Total

1123

(1) Accounting (2)Adm/Mgt/HRM (3)Banking/Finance (4)Clerk (5)IT Professional (6)Textile/Fashion Designer (7)Engineer (8)Law/Legal (9)Marketing (10)Medical&Health Related (11)Research Officer/Assistant (12)Scientific Officer/Lab Assistant (13)Teacher/Lecturer (14)Technician (15)Agricultural Officer (16)Social Worker (17)PR/Communication (18)Environmental Officer (19)Other Professional (20) Consultant (21) Quality Officer (22) Programme/Project Officer (23) Trainee

25

Graduate Tracer Study of UoM/UTM 2011 - Graduates' Labour Market Experiences

Table 7: Graduates' Employment distributed by Sector
UoM & UTM Total No. Sector Public 149 13.4 % Gender M % 9.2 F % 16.6 M % 8.4 UoM F % 17.0 M % 13.6 UTM F % 13.0 Agri % 23.3 Eng % 4.5 Law & Mgt % 6.1 UoM Faculty MGI % 41.5 Science % 19.6 SS & Hum % 20.5 Total No. 129 % 13.4 SBMF % 9.5 SITE % 6.1 UTM School SSDT % 22.2 Total No. 20 % 13.3 2006 % 12.1 2007 % 10.7 Cohort 2008 % 14.5 2009 % 14.8 2010 % 14.2

Parastatal

122

11.0

10.3

11.5

11.4

12.4

4.9

4.3

10.0

10.8

4.7

17.1

19.6

15.5

115

12.0

6.3

6.1

1.9

7

4.7

14.9

11.6

11.2

9.2

9.7

Local Authority

3

0.3

0.0

0.5

0.0

0.4

0.0

1.4

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.9

2

0.2

0.0

0.0

1.9

1

0.7

0.0

0.0

0.4

0.4

0.4

Private

821

74.0

79.0

70.2

79.0

69.0

79.0

79.7

66.7

84.0

87.4

39.0

59.4

61.6

702

73.1

81.0

87.9

72.2

119

79.3

70.9

76.4

72.6

74.7

74.5

Self-employed

15

1.4

1.5

1.3

1.3

1.2

2.5

1.4

0.0

0.7

1.9

2.4

1.4

1.4

12

1.3

3.2

0.0

1.9

3

2.0

2.1

1.3

1.2

0.9

1.1

Total

1110

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

960

100

100

100

100

150

100

100

100

100

100

100

26

Table 8: Employed Graduates* requiring at least a degree distributed by Programme of study and Cohort
Year Fields of Study
Agriculture Agricultural Biotechnology Agriculture sp Agribusiness Agriculture sp Aquaculture Agriculture sp Organic Farming Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Agriscience & Technology Food Science & Technology Food Science with Home Economics Food Science with Nutrition Engineering Business Informatics Chemical & Environmental Chemical & Renewable Energy Civil Engineering Computer Science & Eng Computer Science with Multimedia Electrical & Electronic Electronics&Communication Electronics&Computer Science ICT Information Systems Information Technology Manufacturing Mechanical Mechatronics Production & Operations Mgt Textile &Fashion Design Law&Management Accounting (minor Finance) Accounting minor Information Systems Accounting with Finance Accounting with Information Systems Finance Finance (Minor:Law) Finance with Law HRM Law Law&Mgt Management Mgt with Finance Mgt with Information Systems Mkg Mgt Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt Mahatma Gandhi Institute Fine Arts Hindi Indian Philosophy Marathi Telegu Urdu School of Business Management and Finance Accounting with Business Banking & International Finance HRM Public Adm&Mgt

2006 %
100 100 88.7 50.0 60.0 100 100 33.3 100 50.0 100 100 100 100 100 94.7 100 100 100 100 100 80.0 50.0 50.0 75.0 75.0

2007 %
72.7 50.0 100 75.0 95.8 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 66.7 80.0 79.1 100 100 75.0 100 100 75.0 62.5 50.0 66.7 60.0 84.6 100 100 71.4 60.0 60.0 -

2008 %
66.7 50.0 42.9 100 100 75.0 90.0 33.3 50.0 100 91.7 100 100 100 80.0 100 100 100 100 100 82.1 80.0 0.0 75.0 80.0 100 100 66.7 60.0 100 100 100.0 100 75.0 75.0 -

2009 %
46.2 25.0 75.0 100 93.3 66.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 88.9 100 100 75.0 75.0 100 76.0 100 100 85.7 100 75.0 100 100 100 75.0 60.0 50.0 66.7 66.7 66.7 100 33.3 100 57.9 100 25.0 61.5 -

2010 %
50.0 33.3 33.3 100 75.0 88.1 100 50.0 100 100 85.7 100 100 100 100 50.0 100 83.3 100 50.0 76.8 100 100 75.0 100 100 100 66.7 50.0 100 50.0 66.7 10.0 100 50.0 100 50.0 41.7 -

Total %
61.0 36.4 25.0 57.1 100 42.9 83.3 100 83.3 75.0 91.1 62.5 81.0 50.0 100 97.6 33.3 96.2 100 90.0 100 88.5 95.5 100 100 84.2 88.9 81.0 79.7 93.3 80.0 100 88.2 68.2 100 94.1 100 100 77.8 61.1 72.7 75.0 66.7 62.5 57.1 100 50.0 55.6 100 0.0 20.0 59.3 100 57.1 52.0 75.0

(cont.) 27

Table 8: Employed Graduates* requiring at least a degree distributed by Programme of study and Cohort (cont.)
Year Fields of Study
Science Biology Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Chemistry Chemistry with Business Mgt Marine Science & Tech Mathematics Mathematics with Computer Science Medical science Molecular Biology Physics Physics with Computing Physics with Electronics Physiotherapy School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering Business Information Systems Computer Science with Network security Information Technology Enabled Services Mathematics Software Eng Social Science &Humanities Business Economics with Information Systems Economics Economics with Accounting Economics with Management Economics& Finance English French History with International Relations History with Social Studies Joint Humanities Political Science Psychology Social Science with sp. Political Science Social Science with sp. Psychology Social Science with sp. Sociology Social Work Sociology Statistics with Computer Science Statistics with Economics School of Sustainable Development and Tourism Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Tourism&Hospitality Mgt Total
* Full Time Employment

2006 %
86.2 85.7 80.0 100 100 80.0 100 -

2007 %
85.3 100 33.3 87.5 75.0 75.0 100 100 100 100 100 -

2008 %
75.0 37.5 100 100 100 75.0 100.0 66.7 100

2009 %
90.0 100 60.0 100 100 100 100 100 100

2010 %
75.0 100 33.3 100 100 100 100 50.0

Total %
82.4 79.3 33.3 76.9 95.0 92.9 100 100 83.3 100 85.7 71.4

100 100 100 78.3 66.7 100 100 83.3 100 100 25.0 -

100.0 100 100 100 76.4 80.0 80.0 75.0 100 80.0 66.7 50.0 50.0 50.0 66.7 85.7 100.0 -

77.8 100 100 60.0 100 76.3 60.0 100 60.0 60.0 100 100 75.0 75.0 0.0 80.0 50.0 100 100 100 100

75.0 75.0 57.6 25.0 100 50.0 50.0 100 33.3 100 50.0 50.0 100 100 50.0

62.5 50.0 100 100 63.3 75.0 100 33.3 75.0 83.3 75.0 66.7 66.7 80.0 100 60.0 -

81.3 83.3 100 60.0 92.9 70.8 61.1 85.7 44.4 63.6 83.3 95.0 79.2 50.0 45.5 82.4 28.6 50.0 50.0 50.0 85.7 50.0 84.6 77.8 66.7

85.7

50.0 50.0 82.9

57.1 57.1 79.4

36.4 44.4 73.6

36.8 50.0 67.3

40.0 0.0 48.5 76.9

28

Table 9: Employed Graduates* requiring a degree in the relevant field of Study distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort

Programme of Study

Agriculture
Agricultural Biotechnology Agriculture sp Agribusiness Agriculture sp Aquaculture Agriculture sp Organic Farming Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Agriscience & Technology Food Science & Technology Food Science with Home Economics Food Science with Nutrition

Engineering
Business Informatics Chemical & Environmental Chemical & Renewable Energy Civil Engineering Computer Science & Eng Computer Science with Multimedia Electrical & Electronic Electronics&Communication Electronics&Computer Science ICT Information Systems Information Technology Manufacturing Mechanical Mechatronics Production & Operations Mgt Textile &Fashion Design

Law&Management
Accounting (minor Finance) Accounting minor Information Systems Accounting with Finance Accounting with Information Systems Finance Finance (Minor:Law) Finance with Law HRM Law Law&Mgt Management Mgt with Finance Mgt with Information Systems Mkg Mgt Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt

Mahatma Gandhi Institute
Fine Arts Hindi Indian Philosophy Marathi Telegu Urdu

School of Business Management and Finance
Accounting with Business Banking & International Finance HRM Public Adm&Mgt

Science
Biology Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Chemistry Chemistry with Business Mgt Marine Science & Tech Mathematics

2006 50.0 50.0 84.9 50.0 60.0 100 100 33.3 100 50.0 100 77.8 100 100 100 89.5 100 100 100 100 100 60.0 50.0 50.0 75.0 75.0 65.5 57.1 80.0 66.7

2007 63.6 50.0 100.0 50.0 89.6 66.7 87.5 100 100 100 100 66.7 100 100 100 100 66.7 80.0 69.0 100 100 25.0 100 100 75.0 50.0 50.0 60.0 84.6 100 100 71.4 60.0 60.0 67.6 87.5 33.3 50.0 75.0

2008 47.6 25.0 28.6 100.0 60.0 75.0 86.7 33.3 50.0 100 83.3 100 100 100 80.0 100 100 50.0 100 100 74.4 80.0 0.0 75.0 60.0 100 75.0 66.7 40.0 100 100 100.0 100 75.0 75.0 75.0 37.5 100 100

2009 46.2 25.0 75.0 100.0 91.7 66.7 100 100 100 100 100 100 88.9 100 100 75.0 75.0 75.0 66.0 100 100 85.7 0.0 100 50.0 100 33.3 100 50.0 60.0 50.0 33.3 66.7 66.7 100 33.3 100 55.6 100 25.0 58.3 85.0 100 60.0 100

2010 Total 41.7 49.2 33.3 27.3 25.0 33.3 57.1 100.0 28.6 50.0 71.4 66.7 75.0 75.0 84.7 87.5 50.0 100 76.2 50.0 50.0 100 100 90.0 92.9 33.3 85.7 96.2 100 100 100 90.0 100 94.7 100 88.5 50.0 86.4 100 100 100 83.3 78.9 100.0 88.9 33.3 71.4 69.1 71.2 100 93.3 100 80.0 100 88.2 75.0 54.5 100 100 88.2 80.0 91.7 100 78.6 50.0 72.2 30.8 42.9 100 72.7 50.0 63.6 66.7 55.6 62.5 10.0 57.1 100 50.0 55.6 100 100 20.0 47.1 57.7 100 100 50.0 57.1 36.4 47.8 75.0 65.0 71.0 66.7 65.5 33.3 33.3 65.4 75.0 80.0

(cont.) 29

Table 9: Employed Graduates* requiring a degree in the relevant field of Study distributed by Programme of Study and Cohort (Cont.)

Programme of Study Mathematics with Computer Science Medical science Molecular Biology Physics Physics with Computing Physics with Electronics Physiotherapy

School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering
Business Information Systems Computer Science with Network security Information Technology Enabled Services Mathematics Software Eng

Social Studies &Humanities
Business Economics with Information Systems Economics Economics with Accounting Economics with Management Economics& Finance English French History with International Relations History with Social Studies Joint Humanities Political Science Psychology Social Science with sp. Political Science Social Science with sp. Psychology Social Science with sp. Sociology Social Work Sociology Statistics with Computer Science Statistics with Economics

School of Sustainable Development and Tourism
Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Tourism&Hospitality Mgt

Grand Total
* Full Time Employment

2006 80.0 100 100 100 100 78.3 66.7 100 100 83.3 100 100 25.0 78.6

2007 50.0 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 67.3 80.0 80.0 75.0 83.3 80.0 25.0 50.0 50.0 33.3 85.7 100 50.0 50.0 74.1

2008 100 75.0 100 66.7 100 77.8 100 100 60.0 100 66.1 40.0 100 60.0 60.0 100 100 50.0 25.0 60.0 100 100 100 100 57.1 57.1 73.0

2009 100 100 100 100 75.0 75.0 48.5 0.0 100 0.0 50.0 25.0 100 33.3 100 50.0 100 100 50.0 36.4 44.4 68.8

2010 Total 100 71.4 100 100 0.0 83.3 100 100 85.7 50.0 57.1 62.5 81.3 50.0 83.3 100 100 60.0 0.0 100 92.9 53.1 62.1 75.0 50.0 100 85.7 33.3 44.4 75.0 63.6 66.7 75.0 50.0 85.0 66.7 75.0 10.0 33.3 27.3 80.0 76.5 0.0 50.0 25.0 50.0 37.5 85.7 50.0 40.0 76.9 77.8 66.7 26.3 35.0 0.0 35.7 42.4 60.6 70.2

30

Table 10: Distribution of Unemployed graduates by Programme of Study and Cohort
Year Programme of Study Agriculture
Agricultural Biotechnology Agriculture sp Agribusiness Agriculture sp Aquaculture Agriculture sp Organic Farming Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Agriscience & Technology Food Science & Technology Food Science with Home Economics Food Science with Nutrition

Total %
17.0 26.3 18.2 30.8 33.3 10.0 3.5 6.9 3.6 3.6 6.9 8.0 4.2 4.8 3.7 7.2 11.5 11.1 4.5 13.5 13.3 25.0 30.9 29.2 37.5 50.0 43.8

2006 % 7.4 25.0 14.3 -

2007 % 8.3
-

2008 % 3.7 14.3
-

2009 % 6.3 20.0 2.9 20.0 14.3 6.9 20.0 20.0 33.3 25.0 8.3 25.0 -

2010 % 40.0 50.0 44.4 75.0 7.5 20.0 -

20.0
-

Engineering
Business Informatics Chemical & Environmental Chemical & Renewable Energy Civil Engineering Computer Science & Eng Computer Science with Multimedia Electrical & Communication Electrical & Electronic Electronics&Communication Electronics&Computer Science ICT Information Systems Information Technology Manufacturing Mechanical Mechatronics Production & Operations Mgt Textile &Fashion Design

1.9 16.7 8.0 20.0
-

4.5 33.3 12.5 33.3 4.3 11.1 16.7 33.3 33.3
-

12.5 40.0 -

16.7 8.7 20.0 14.3 19.0 55.2 57.1 57.1 50.0 63.6

Law&Manangement
Accounting (minor Finance) Accounting minor Information Systems Accounting with Finance Accounting with Information Systems Finance Finance (Minor:Law) Finance with Law HRM Law Law&Mgt Management Mgt with Finance Mgt with Information Systems Marketing Mgt Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt

9.1 28.6 17.6 33.3 22.2 -

Mahatma Gandhi Institute
Fine Arts Hindi Indian Philosophy Marathi Tamil Telegu Urdu

-

(cont.) 31

Table 10: Distribution of Unemployed graduates by Programme of Study and Cohort (cont.)
Year Programme of Study School of Business Management and Finance
Accounting with Business Banking & International Finance HRM Public Adm&Mgt

Total %
9.3 20.0 3.4 13.9 15.5 13.5 100 15.2 50.0 11.1 23.5 27.3 18.8

2006 % 3.2 25.0 -

2007 % 2.6 10.0 -

2008 % 10.0
-

2009 % 8.3 33.3 6.7 10.3 25.0
-

2010 % 13.8 19.0 40.0 42.9 100 20.0 50.0 25.0 100 100 14.3

10.0
-

Science
Biology Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Biology minor Environmental Protection Biology minor Environmental Studies Chemistry Chemistry with Business Mgt Marine Science & Tech Mathematics Mathematics with Computer Science Medical Science Medecine Molecular Biology Physics Physics with Computing Physics with Electronics Physiotherapy

13.5 -

37.5
-

28.6

14.3 33.3 -

School of Innovative Technologies and Engineering
Business Information Systems Computer Science with Network security Information Technology Enabled Services Mathematics Software Eng

8.7 22.2 33.3 16.8 10.0 11.8 7.7 20.0 8.8 100 33.3 38.1 16.7 46.7 44.4 9.1 20.0 13.3 -

-

-

9.7 50.0 12.5 14.3 50.0 16.7 25.0 -

25.0 66.7
-

16.7 33.3 27.2 20.0 20.0 28.6 62.5 42.9 22.2 50.0 50.0 28.6 -

Social Studies &Humanities
Business Economics with Information Systems Economics Economics with Accounting Economics with Management Economics& Finance English French History with Heritage Studies History with International Relations History with Social Studies Joint Humanities Political Science Psychology Social Science with sp. Political Science Social Science with sp. Psychology Social Science with sp. Sociology Social Work Sociology Statistics with Computer Science Statistics with Economics

6.2 12.5 100 20.0 20.0 -

30.9 20.0 33.3 66.7 75.0 33.3 40.0 25.0 60.0
100

20.0 -

School of Sustainable Development and Tourism
Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Tourism&Hospitality Mgt

Total Unemployed

12.9 15.7 11.7

1.8

5.5

10.0 10.0 7.4

6.3 8.3 11.5

20.0 26.1 23.2

32

Table 11:Unemployment and Underemployment Rates by Programme of Study
Programme of Study Biology minor Environmental Protection History with Heritage Studies Marathi Marine Science & Tech Political Science Psychology Urdu History with Social Studies Indian Philosophy Agriscience & Technology History with International Relations Mathematics Agriculture sp Aquaculture Hindi Physics with Electronics Agricultural Biotechnology Tourism,Leisure & Recreational Mgt Physics Information Technology Enabled Services Accounting with Business English Social Work Physiotherapy Agriculture sp Agribusiness Joint Humanities Tourism&Hospitality Mgt Chemistry HRM Biology Management Mgt with Information Systems Sociology Economics Finance Law Mathematics with Computer Science Business Economics with Information Systems Food Science with Home Economics Social Science with sp. Psychology French Information Technology Economics& Finance Unemployment Rate (%) 2 1 1 4 7 4 7 8 6 3 2 7 4 7 3 5 3 4 2 1 6 1 3 2 4 8 5 5 5 7 2 2 2 3 2 2 1 2 1 3 2 2 100 100 50.0 50.0 46.7 44.4 43.8 38.1 37.5 33.3 33.3 33.3 30.8 29.2 27.3 26.3 25.0 23.5 22.2 20.0 20.0 20.0 18.8 18.2 16.7 15.7 15.2 13.9 13.5 13.5 13.3 13.3 11.8 11.5 11.1 11.1 10.0 10.0 9.1 8.8 8.0 7.7 Underemployment Rate (%) 1 5 2 4 6 4 1 5 3 3 7 1 7 3 2 2 1 2 2 6 3 17 6 12 6 14 3 2 2 7 1 7 1 4 5 1 4 50 71.4 50 57.1 50 44.4 16.7 50 13.7 42.9 53.8 14.3 63.6 37.5 16.7 33.3 5 50 20 75.0 16.7 50 23.1 32.4 20 38.9 33.3 15.4 14.3 30.4 7.1 38.9 16.7 50 18.5 4.3 16.7

(cont.) 33

Table 11:Unemployment and Underemployment Rates by Programme of Study
Programme of Study Chemical & Environmental Information Systems Mechatronics Law&Mgt Mechanical Textile &Fashion Design Civil Engineering Electrical & Electronic Banking & International Finance Telegu Chemistry with Business Mgt Occupational Health & Safety Mgt Computer Science with Multimedia Biology minor Aquatic and Environmental Sciences Agriculture with Natural Resource Mgt Economics with Accounting Social Science with sp. Political Science Chemical & Renewable Energy Business Informatics Economics with Management Statistics with Economics Marketing Mgt Public Adm&Mgt Mgt with Finance Food Science with Nutrition Statistics with Computer Science Accounting minor Information Systems Business Information Systems Accounting with Information Systems Social Science with sp. Sociology Production & Operations Mgt Electronics&Computer Science Software Eng Accounting (minor Finance) Finance with Law Computer Science & Eng Unemployment Rate (%) 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6.9 6.9 4.8 4.5 4.2 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.4 1 10 1 1 11 2 2 4 5 3 3 3 4 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 18.2 3.8 45.5 100 100 91.7 66.7 66.7 57.1 55.6 50.0 50.0 37.5 36.4 33.3 27.3 25.0 25.0 25.0 22.2 20.0 16.7 16.7 14.3 11.1 10.0 7.1 6.3 5.9 2.4 Underemployment Rate (%) 4 3 3 4 19 11.1 15.8 22.2

34…...

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...RESEARCH PROPOSAL PART I: BASIC INFORMATION PROJECT TITLE: “TRACER STUDY OF GRADUATES OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY OF IFUGAO STATE UNIVERSITY POTIA CAMPUS, ALFONSO LISTA, IFUGAO: S.Y 2006 – 2011” STUDY TITLE: TRACER STUDY AS A PARADIGM FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF QUALITY COURSE PROGRAMME DEVELOPMENT FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT AT IFUGAO STATE UNIVERSITY, POTIA CAMPUS. RESEARCH PROPONENTS: 1. Sheila Mae F. Alojado 2. Jericoh B. Ticgue 3. R-jay S. Villarta Adviser: Dr. Patricia A. Alguyon IMPLEMENTING / FUNDING AGENCY: Ifugao State University PROJECT DURATION: June 2012 – October 2012 PROJECT LOCATION: COLLEGE OF HOME SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY, IFSU Potia Campus FINANCIAL REQUIREMENT: Introduction It must be acknowledged that Ifugao State University, Alfonso Lista Campus has some of the best higher education institutions in the Region with well equipped workshops and laboratories and professionally staffed with a variety of scholarly professionals. These institutions turn out a large number of associates, graduates and post graduate students in various disciplines and professions. In addition with these, institutions reform their curricula and course programmes at regular intervals to be able to keep abreast with the needs of the rapid technological, societal and institutional changes to be able to meet the requirement of clients. However, once these graduates are pushed out of the walls of the......

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...ABSTRACT The study identified the status and employment settings among B.S. Psychology graduates of Rizal Technological University for Academic Year 2009-2013. There were eight hundred fifty three (853) target respondents that are considered on this study. Eventually, there were two hundred thirty eight (238) Psychology graduates who participated. Descriptive research was utilized in this study for reason that the paper is intended to analyze and interpret the responses in the present status and employment settings of the respondents. Snowball and purposive sampling are applied in obtaining data from Psychology graduates. A researcher made questionnaire was validated and distributed to gather information and data needed for this study. Findings of the study revealed that most of the respondents are female, single, and from Batch 2012. It also showed that majority of the respondents are employed and gained the status as Regular/Permanent employees. The data showed that majority of the respondents are presently in the status of Rank and File position. The data also showed in the study revealed that majority of the respondents has ventured in the field of Industrial/Organizational Psychology/Human Resources/Organizational Development setting. More so, most of the respondents have strongly agreed that their course helped them build their character. That their course has gave the respondents more confidence in getting hired. The researchers recommend through this study......

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...SY 2004-2010: A TRACER STUDY By: ADELIA R. ROADILLA, PhD., RGC INTRODUCTION This study aims to trace the whereabouts of PUP Mulanay graduates from 2004-2007. It describes the progress of the alumni as to what they have gone through after obtaining their respective degrees. The main objective of this paper is to determine the relevance and responsiveness of PUP curricular offerings to the labor market. This study further investigated the appropriateness of the know-how and training PUP students have gained in their years of stay in the university. This study answered the following questions: 1. What is the demographic profile of PUP graduates in terms of: 1.1 Age 1.2 Sex 1.3 Course 1.4 Civil Status 1.5 Degree earned from PUP 1.6 Employment Status 2. What is the usual length of time the respondents spend for looking a job? 3. What are the reasons behind taking a job of PUP Mulanay graduates not related to their field of specialization? 4. Being employed, what is the status of their employment in terms of the nature of company/firm where the graduates work, present position and approximate gross monthly salary? 4. What changes are needed to make the graduates competitive enough in the labor market? 5. What can be the measures to solve the problem of mismatch/unemployment confronting the graduates of PUP Mulanay? Research Design This study used the......

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...Q: What is the definition of "study habits"? A: The definition of study habits is the habitual practices one uses to help them study and learn. Good study habits can help students achieve and/or maintain good grades. Q: How do you study better? A: Effective studying requires thinking positively, studying in a quiet area, rewriting notes, playing memory games and remaining healthy. Students also need to take breaks and reward themselves periodically. To think in a positive manner, students must think about their talents and skills. Negative and defeatist attitudes must be dispelled from the mind. Students also need to avoid comparing their achievements and successes with other people. Getting away from distractions is imperative. For instance, using a computer when taking notes can lead to playing games or surfing the Internet. Using a notebook instead of a computer helps a person focus better. However, listening to a favorite song on an iPod can motivate students to study better. Libraries and quiet off-campus spots are suitable places to learn. Eating a healthy diet is important because the vitamins and nutrients ensure maximum energy when studying. Certain herbs, such as ginko and ginseng, may enhance memorization skills. Exercise and healthy eating are effective aids when studying. Studying for an hour and taking a five-minute break fosters a more productive study session. Breaking chapters into sections avoids studying for long periods. Rewards can come in......

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...succeeding." quoted from the statement of HisExcellency President Benigno S. Aquino III. The K to 12 Education Program aims to produce Filipino graduates who are holistically-developed with 21st century skills prepared for higher education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship. At present, STVEP provides education and training opportunities to prepare students and other clients for employment. It also addresses the skills training requirements of those who are already in the labor market and would need to upgrade or develop new competencies to enhance employability and improve productivity. To prepare the students for future employment, a tracer study is conducted. Tracer study is one of the most useful tool in assessing the impact of an institution to its alumni is through tracers study. It is an approach which widely being used in most organization especially in the educational institutions to track and to keep records of their students once they have graduated from the institution. It is the follow up of graduates to evaluate ones progress up to the time he or she gets a job. It is develop to answer the change in industry and corporate world by integrating the higher education institutions with labor market. There seen as a management tool for planning and monitoring of training programs. A simple tool designed to measure the relevance of vocational training. They provide information for grammatical changes and review of training curricula.......

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...Education + Training A multilevel study of students’ motivations of studying accounting: implications for employers r Fo Journal: Manuscript ID: Manuscript Type: Education Training ET-Feb-2011-0011.R3 Research Paper Pe Keywords: education, industry er ew vi Re Page 1 of 26 A multilevel study of students’ motivations of studying accounting: implications for employers Abstract Purpose This study examines the influence of factors affecting students’ choice of accounting as a study major in Hong Kong. r Fo Design/methodology/approach Multinomial logistic regression and Hierarchical Generalized Linear Modeling (HGLM) are used to analyze the survey data for the level one and level two data, which is the first time such an approach has been used in the literature. Twenty semi- Pe structured interviews are conducted. Findings er Results reveal that parental influence has the highest explanatory power among all three groups of students (i.e. accounting major, accounting minor, and other majors). Re This finding reflects the inculcation in students of the Confucian cultural norms ingrained in Chinese societies. Intrinsic interest is the second most important vi influencing factor reported by students. Two factors, “intrinsic interest” (attitude towards the behavior) and “parental influence” (subjective norm) in the......

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