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Urbanisation

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Urbanisation builds an equitable society The process of people moving into cities, which is called urbanisation, was happening around the world in past decades. It causes cities to have more labourers and resources than before. This makes a big contribution to the social development of cities. Thanks to these social developments, public services are becoming better in these areas. Citizens can enjoy a better life by access these public services such as better medical care, more education resources and well-built transport. It means an equitable society can be created. An equitable society means citizens can have more opportunities to access social resources and to live a better life. This essay will argue that urbanisation builds an equitable society. The reasons for this will include more career opportunities for citizens and higher life quality. Urbanisation can bring same opportunities to citizens to get financial security, which provided by career achievement. Job achievement not only leads financial support of daily life but also leads a better life standard. Firstly, people can access education resources more easily and this enables them to acquire more job skills. Thongyou et al. (2014, p. 36) state that one of the most positive impacts of urbanisation is it brings more education opportunities to young people in rural areas because of more convenient transportation to the city where vocational colleges and universities are located. From this evidence, it can be seen that due to the high population growth, more convenient transport were built. These young people in rural areas can access colleges or universities more easily due to the convenient transportation and they can acquire job skills with fewer difficulties. This means the young people in urban areas and rural areas can have an equitable chance to be educated to get a job. Also, learning more skills makes young people in rural areas more easily to get promotion and higher salary, so the income gap between urban and rural areas will narrowed. Secondly, people in cities can get employment equality. According to Buhaug and Urdal (2013, p. 2), population concentration is important for industry development. Over the last fifty years, many of most rapidly urbanizing developing countries have also experienced high economic growth rates. Also, Rutkowski & Scarpetta (2005, p. 62) point out that labour markets are strongly link to the levels of economic development. This evidence shows that urbanisation enables the economy to develop quickly in these urban areas. Because of the economic growth, more job opportunities can be created. People can have more chances to get or change to a good job. This means poor people can have more chance to earn more money. So the poor and the rich are more likely to live an equitable life. To summarise, urbanisation brings more education and job opportunities to people and this enable them have the same opportunities to develop their ability and get financial security. Urbanisation can improve citizens’ life quality and enable them to have an equal chance to live better. This is because more resources, which can makes citizens’ life better, are provided to them. Firstly, urbanisation brings efficiency and convenient to citizens. For example, according to Zhang et al. (2013, p. 92), Guangdong Province is one of the most urbanized provinces in China. The urbanisation rate of Guangdong was 60.68% in 2005, which is 17.69% higher than the average. Guangdong contains five major airports and efficient railway nets that can connect to many main cities in China. This evidence shows that urbanisation contributes a lot to the public transport system in Guangdong. There have built several different kinds of public transports that can connect to many other cities. People can use these public transports equally. By using these convenient transports, people can live a high-efficiency life because less time is spent on the way. That is to say, even those people far away from Guangdong can go to Guangdong quickly and access the resources in Guangdong more easily. So people can enjoy different kinds of resources equally because of convenient transport. Secondly, urbanisation brings more goods to citizens and people can improve their life quality by using these goods. According to Li & Yao (2009, p. 1995), electrical appliances are becoming popular because of urbanisation. For example, air conditional owner-ship is rapidly growing up in China. Some families even have more than two units. From this evidence, it can be showed that urbanisation brings more modernised goods such as air conditioners to citizens. Citizens can access these useful goods more easily and they are able to live a higher standard life by using these goods. They have the same opportunities to buy these goods to improve their life quality. This means the opportunities to improve the quality of life can become equal in the society. All in all, urbanisation builds an equitable society as it improves people’s life quality and gives them same opportunities to enjoy their life. In conclusion, it is clear that urbanisation allow people to have same chance to get financial security by providing them more education opportunities and more job vacancies. Furthermore, the convenient transport and the abundant goods, which is urbanisation leads to, enable people to have same opportunities to live a high quality life. Therefore, the argument is clear that urbanisation built an equitable society. Urbanisation brings many benefits to society. To make the society more harmonious, urbanisation should be encouraged to happen in more countries. Also, governments should take measures to maximize the benefits of urbanisation.

References:
Buhaug, H & Urdal, H 2013, ‘An urbanization bomb? Population growth and social disorder in cities’, Global Environmental Chang, vol. 23, no. 1, p. 9.
Li, B & Yao, R 2009, ‘Urbanisation and its impact on building energy consumption and efficiency in China’, Renewable Energy, vol. 34, no. 1, p. 1995.
Rutkowski, JJ & Scarpetta, S 2005, Enhancing job opportunities: Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, The World Bank, Washington DC.
Thongyou, M, Chamaratana, T, Phongsiri, M & Sosamphanh, B 2014, ‘Perceptions on urbanization impact on the hinterlands: a study of Khon Kaen City, Thailand’, Asian Social Science, vol. 10, no. 11, p. 36.
Zhang, HQ, Luo, JM, Xiao, Q & Guillet, BD 2013, ‘The impact of urbanization on hotel development: evidence from Guangdong Province in China’, International Journal of Hospital Management, vol. 34, no. 1, p. 92.…...

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